Customer experience key to eCommerce sales, says AusPost

Retailers who move quickly to invest in next-generation customer service technology are more likely to lead the battle for sales in a tightening economic environment, according to two of Australia’s most innovative online retailers.
The insights come as the search for Australia’s favourite online retailer kicks off, with the Australia Post ORIAS People’s Choice Award providing online retailers with a platform to elevate their brand, gain industry recognition, build trust, and grow customer loyalty.
One of last year’s winners Koh, credited the updating of its customer service software – ahead of many of its competitors – with helping it double revenue over the past 12 months.
Founder Adam Lindsay, who recently launched the eco-friendly cleaning products company into the UK, said the focus was on giving both existing and new customers what they want.
“If you don’t service existing customers properly, you’ll have to deal with a leaky bucket – and therefore spend more time and money on acquiring new customers,” Mr Lindsay said.
Kogan, which took out the 2018 Award for best large online retailer, reiterated its commitment to embracing data-driven insights to improve its customer service capability.
Daniel Beahan, Director of Customer Care, said Kogan considered itself a statistics business masquerading as an eCommerce company.
“Data is key to unlocking our customer expectations and it is our mission to understand the wants and needs of our customers better than any other online retailer,” Mr Beahan said.
“Company growth relies on us delighting our active customer base time and time again, and our mission remains to make the most in-demand products and services more affordable for all Australians.”
Last year’s winners highlighted a customer-first focus, an ability to change and be nimble, the importance of personalisation to create a tailored customer service experience, the continued embrace of social media platforms like Facebook and Instagram to drive awareness and advocacy, and the harnessing of data and analytics as all being key to online retailers.
The launch coincides with an Australia Post report which found the number of purchases online has grown by more than 20 per cent for the year, with online shopping now making up 9 per cent share of traditional retail spend in 2018.
Andrew Chamberlain, Australia Post General Manager of Enterprise, said Koh and Kogan.com exemplified eCommerce-savvy businesses that embraced innovation to enhance online experience, ultimately driving customer loyalty and sales.
“In considering potential winners of the Australia Post ORIAS People’s Choice Award, one of the key things consumers look at is a personalised experience that supports ease of purchase – an area in which both Koh and Kogan.com are excelling,” Mr Chamberlain said.

Road freight on the rise in Australia

Australian freight vehicles moved an estimated 214,789 million tonne-kilometres (tkm) of freight across Australia’s road network in 2017-18, according to figures released this week by the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS).
“The 2017-18 figure represents a 5.0 per cent increase in tonne–kilometres (one tonne moved on road over one kilometre) since 2016,” said ABS Transport Statistics Director, Lauren Binns.
“Articulated trucks carried the bulk of Australian road freight, transporting 165,336 million tonne-kilometres, 77.0 per cent of the total road freight task,” said Binns. “This is despite articulated trucks comprising less than 1.0 per cent of all vehicles on Australian roads.”
The majority of road freight transported crude materials (30 per cent) such as stone, sand and gravel, followed by manufactured goods (12 per cent) and food and live animals (11 per cent).
Freight vehicles registered in Victoria moved more freight than any other State or Territory with 55,450 million tkm. This was followed by Queensland (49,038 million tkm), New South Wales (48,709 million tkm) and Western Australia (35,953 million tkm).
Passenger vehicles continue to constitute the majority of registered vehicles comprising 75 per cent of vehicles across Australia. In 2017-18 passenger vehicles travelled a total of 179,761 million kilometres at an average of 12,600 kilometres per vehicle.
New information from the Survey of Motor Vehicle Use will help inform national freight and supply chain priorities aimed at improving the safety and efficiency of the Australian freight task.

Supply chain digitisation to be tested on Joint Strike Fighter

BAE Systems Australia and the Advanced Manufacturing Growth Centre (AMGC) will bring Industry 4.0 to reality through participation in the Joint Strike Fighter defence program.
The $750,000 project will develop a new approach to supply chain digitisation that avoids having to use expensive, proprietary software which is currently one of the major barriers to Australian SME manufacturers participating in global supply chains.
Digitisation allows for project partners to see plans in real time, identify and resolve issues faster, improve risk management and optimise production.
Australia received its first two F-35 aircraft in December last year in what is the largest air force acquisition in Australia’s history.
BAE Systems supplies 300 titanium components per month from its advanced manufacturing facility at Edinburgh Parks in South Australia for each F-35 vertical tail.
The company will work with its existing Joint Strike Fighter supply chain partners Axiom Precision Manufacturing and RUAG on this project, together with Advanced Focus and Flinders University.
The Defence aerospace industry was selected because of the stringent security and traceability requirements both in Australia and allied nations.
BAE Systems Australia’s Aerospace and Integrated Systems Director Steve Drury said this is so much more than replacing paper processes with digital technology.
“If we get this right and develop a freely available, open standard to digitise supply chains, the long-term benefits of this project to the broader Australian industry could be significant.”
This project is part of a series of BAE Systems Industry 4.0 activities that the company is running on its own or in collaboration with industry and universities.
Success could also see the adoption of digitisation on other major defence projects including the Jindalee Operational Radar Network (JORN) and the Hunter Class Frigate Program.
AMGC, which is part of a Commonwealth backed initiative, expects its co-funding of this project to allow other SMEs interested in participating in future defence projects to have access to the trial results and business tools developed as a result of the work.
AMGC Managing Director Dr Jens Goennemann, said the development of best practice between a leading defence industry prime and Australian SMEs is another example of how everyone can win from collaboration.
“This will be essential if Australia’s manufacturing sector and economy is to successfully transform as the global market accelerates toward the adoption of Industry 4.0.”

UPS announces new collaboration to improve e-commerce for merchants

UPS has announced a new alliance with technology company Inxeption. The two companies announced a platform integration called Inxeption Zippy that helps businesses market and distribute their products on multiple online channels, from one secure place.
Inxeption’s e-commerce platform and online product catalog enable manufacturers, distributors and wholesalers to easily set up a company-branded online site to conduct e-commerce transactions.
Inxeption then helps them list, market and sell their products to their business customers. Its blockchain-backed technology helps ensure that sensitive information such as contract-specific pricing and negotiated rates are only shared between the buyer and seller.
“The growth of e-commerce is driving B2B buyers to expect the same fast and convenient shopping experiences that consumers enjoy. Working with Inxeption is another way we’re creating innovative solutions that helps small businesses deliver quality service for their customers and succeed in e-commerce,” Kevin Warren, Chief Marketing Officer for UPS said.
B2B e-commerce is evolving fast, with Forrester projecting the market to reach $1.8 trillion by 2023; yet B2B merchants have been slow to adopt online commerce. Most B2B products are still sold through direct sales, third-party distribution, or both.
By integrating advanced technology with global logistics, UPS and Inxeption are turning more B2B merchants into digital sellers and equipping them to drive online sales and grow their top line revenue. In turn, their customers can easily order and receive their products with trusted shipping from UPS.
“We’re revolutionising B2B e-commerce and bringing companies and their customers together online in a trusted manner. This relationship creates simplified pricing solutions for B2B merchants with limited digital marketing and IT resources to easily manage all aspects of selling and shipping from one secure place,” Farzad Dibachi, CEO of Inxeption said.

Maersk trials biofuel blend in Triple-E container ship

Maersk is partnering with a group of Dutch multinationals – FrieslandCampina, Heineken, Philips, DSM, Shell and Unilever – to take a tangible step towards the decarbonisation of ocean shipping.
A pilot, using up to 20% sustainable second-generation biofuels on a large triple-E ocean vessel will sail 25.000 nautical miles from Rotterdam to Shanghai and back on biofuel blends alone, a world’s first at this scale, saving 1,5 million kilograms CO2 and 20.000 kilograms of sulphur.
DSGC members and Maersk all agree that tackling harmful emissions related to shipping is urgently needed, and that cross-industry collaboration is required to develop, test and implement new solutions. The DSGC members, many of which are customers to Maersk, played a critical role. They initiated and sponsor the pilot. Shell, acted as the fuel supplier for the pilot, and Maersk played the role as operating partner.
Sustainably sourced second-generation biofuels are just one possible solution for the decarbonisation of ocean shipping.
Longer term, breakthroughs in fuel and technical development (i.e. e-fuels) and the investment into commercial supply chains are needed to achieve significant emissions reductions.
“DSGC companies join in action to contribute to the UN SDGs. With this initiative we focus on Climate Action (SDG 13). We have taken the initiative to partner with A.P. Moller-Maersk on this important effort,” says Jan Peter Balkenende, Chair of the DSGC. “This pilot testing biofuel on a cross ocean shipping lane, marks an important step. However, many more innovations are urgently needed. These can only be successfully developed, tested and implemented in industry collaborations like this.”
“To reach our net zero CO2 target by 2050, in the next 10 years we need big breakthroughs. Maersk cannot do this alone. That is why this collaboration with DSGC and its members is such an important step in identifying and bringing low carbon solutions to life. It laid the foundation for how cross-industry partners can work together to take steps towards a more sustainable future. We welcome others to join in our efforts, as this journey is just beginning,” Søren Toft, Chief Operating Officer A.P. Moller – Maersk said.
Shipping accounts for 90% of transported goods and 3% of total global CO2-emissions, and is set to rise to 15% by 2050 if left unchecked. The CO2 savings of this journey alone equates to the annual CO2 emitted by over 200 households in a year or 12 mill km travelled in an average car which is 300 times around the world. The voyage will take place between March and June 2019.

Labor to review ‘exorbitant’ port surcharges

Peak body Road Freight NSW (RFNSW) has welcomed the State Opposition’s support to stop ‘exorbitant’ port surcharges unfairly imposed on truck operators at Port Botany and its pledge to work with RFNSW in a review of exemptions for the luxury-vehicle tax.
Opposition Leader Michael Daley and Shadow Minister for Roads, Maritime and Freight Jodi McKay said landside prices and charges had ‘escalated rapidly without explanation or justification’ and promised to put an end to ‘unfettered and unfair pricing practices’ at the port, if elected on Saturday.
“On behalf of our members, RFNSW is pleased the Opposition has listened and acted on the concerns of our members. It’s time industry had a fair and robust price monitoring system at the port,” RFNSW’s chief executive Simon O’Hara said.
“For over two years now, RFNSW has been fighting hard to raise awareness of these mounting surcharges imposed by the stevedores and their crippling financial impact on truck operators. It’s out of control.
“We’ve said all along there must be an independent body called in to regulate infrastructure and other landside charges, which is why we welcome the Opposition’s pledge to formalise the involvement of IPART in the setting of port charges.”
Mr O’Hara said RFNSW was pleased that Ms McKay had responded to industry concerns over the luxury vehicle tax, stating that the ALP would maintain ‘all current exemptions and concessions, including those for heavy trailers.’
“Following our ongoing advocacy and dialogue on behalf of our members, Ms McKay has assured us that the Opposition is committed to a review of those exemptions, in order to protect the trucking industry and will work with RFNSW as part of that review,” he added.

Health support – from MHD magazine

The pharmaceutical industry
The pharmaceutical industry is a knowledge-based, technology-intensive industry that comprises bio-medical research, biotechnology firms, originator and generic medicines companies and service-related segments, including wholesaling and distribution.
The volume of the global pharmaceutical market has more than doubled in the past ten years. By the end of 2016, the global sales volume was estimated to have risen to nearly $A1.5 trillion.
In a snapshot from the CSIRO in 2017, the Australian medical technologies and pharmaceutical sector provided 48,000 jobs in total, across 50 pharmaceutical companies, 400 biotechnology companies and 500 medical technology companies.
And the importance of this industry is growing. Australia’s pharmaceutical market is set to rise to over $A25 billion by 2020.
This industry seeks to deliver medication and related health services that meet the best possible health and economic objectives, including timely access to medicines that meet appropriate standards of quality, safety and efficacy.
The simplified logistics and shortened supply chain of the 1930s, where most pharmacists were still mixing powders and vials and making tablets in their own pharmacies for delivery to customers, made it much easier to meet these objectives.
Today, medicines are distributed through a complex supply chain, which can be disrupted anywhere along its path, from manufacturing to dispensing. The pharmaceutical supply chain is a core part of Australia’s healthcare system, making medicines readily available to all Australians, regardless of location.
SSI SCHAEFER develops and implements supply chain solutions that cater for the future growth of pharmaceutical manufacturers, wholesalers and retailers. SSI SCHAEFER order fulfilment systems support everything from traditional wholesale distribution to omni-channel logistics, including fast-paced e-commerce requirements.

Pharmaceutical wholesale
Pharmaceutical wholesalers procure, distribute and sell a wide range of pharmaceutical and medicinal products. These products include prescription medicines, pharmacy-only medicines, over-the-counter (OTC) medicines, other healthcare products and veterinary pharmaceuticals.
Pharmaceutical wholesalers in the Australian market generate $A14.6bn in annual revenue and employ around 13,000 staff.
Although the principles of a pharmaceutical supply chain are similar to other products and industries, there are very specific issues and characteristics that make it different. Within the supply chain there are a number of rigorous regulatory requirements, such as international customs and importation hurdles, complex transport and storage needs, massive SKU proliferation, and significant pressure to maintain continuity of supply.
Pharmaceutical supply chains are not only important for hospitals, practitioners and consumers, but are also important from social and political perspectives. The impacts of disrupted supply can be felt widely and quickly, and have serious ramifications. It is crucial that medicines be delivered at the right time to the right person in standard conditions. Improper distribution of medicinal products not only affects brand reputation, customer satisfaction and company profits, but can also disrupt the healing processes of patients and negatively impact public health.

“Consistent, reliable service levels are clearly paramount, as is the compliance with regulatory requirements.”

Factors that contribute to unanticipated shortages of medicines include manufacturing faults, logistical failures and unexpected or unpredictable disease outbreaks. Additionally, unexpected safety signals may require recalling of batches with a consequential scarcity of remaining supplies at short notice.
With notable unexpected shortages, the vulnerability of the supply of medicines is exposed. Supply may be restricted or delayed anywhere in the supply chain from manufacturing to the dispensary. The high margins on pharma products, coupled with the limited patent lifespans, mean pharmaceutical companies must significantly focus on maintaining supply.

The challenges
Consistency. End-user customers demand the highest standards of quality and with zero-fault tolerance. Consistent, reliable service levels are clearly paramount, as is the compliance with regulatory requirements.
Regulation. The foundations of Australia’s pharmaceutical supply chain have shifted over recent years due to global and local factors. The NMP (National Medicines Policy) commits to providing timely, Australia-wide access to affordable medicines that meet appropriate standards of quality, safety and efficacy, while maintaining a responsible and viable medicines industry.
Internationally, the industry is moving towards the new Goods Distribution Practice (GDP), which is similar to the Good Wholesaling Practice, but extends the requirements around handling, transportation and traceability. Incorporating these will add challenging logistics hurdles that demand significant investment in existing Australian infrastructure.
Pack variety. There is a significant variety of packaging in the pharmaceutical industry – a vast array of box sizes and dimensions, packets and satchels, glass vials and jars including liquid dosage, plastic bottles etc. Also, packaging must be safeguarded throughout the logistics chain to maintain perfect appearance, not only for aesthetics but also for clarity of essential identification.
The rise of generics. Over recent years, the percentage of generics in the market has been steadily increasing and they are estimated to account for about 90 percent of all prescriptions by 2020 9 This continues to significantly contributes to SKU growth with wholesalers.

“Supply chain visibility is considered of major importance and a significant challenge facing the industry.”

An increasing number of prescriptions. Alongside the rise of generics, there has been an overall rise in the number of prescriptions, in the vicinity of 6.8 per cent in 2015. As the demand for medicines continues to grow, more accurate forecasting and inventory management have become increasingly important.
The rise of cold chain logistics. With demand for cold chain logistics growing, it has become increasingly difficult for pharmaceutical companies to manage fluctuations in demand for temperature-dependent medicines, which can result in exceedingly high inventory costs due to the cooling requirements. This can be of high concern in the Australian market, particularly evident during the hottest January on record that we experienced this year.
The European GDP guidelines extend adherence to storage conditions, as indicated on the packaging, to the transportation leg of the journey. The compliance requirement has long been adhered to with cold chain products – generally anything below 8°C. However, it is new for the majority of the products found in most medicine cabinets, often labelled for 25°C. For example, in practice, the GDP guidelines now apply to about 80% of pharma products in the EU.
Supply chain visibility. Many products are highly sensitive and require end-to-end documentation. Visibility is the ability to track and trace prescription medication. It is also essential to monitor and comply with expiration dates. Supply chain visibility is considered of major importance and a significant challenge facing the industry. Management’s ability to achieve a nearly risk-free environment is primarily enabled by visibility technology that introduces intelligence into every step of the healthcare supply chain.
Storage locations. Storage and picking of pharmaceuticals dictates significant variety and different environments. There is also a need for dedicated storage areas for different types of products such as OTC medications and products, narcotics and hazardous chemicals. Some items require cooling, and others must be held in secure storage.

Order fulfilment systems
SSI SCHAEFER draws on a wealth of expertise and technologies to facilitate the continuous and efficient supply of products in the pharmaceutical industry. SSI SCHAEFER’s order fulfilment systems, whether manual, semi, or fully automated, can flexibly be adapted to the increasing requirements and demands of this industry sector, and include:

  • Carton and tote bin conveyor and handling systems for efficient material flow.
  • High productivity ‘goods-to-person’ order picking systems.
  • ‘A-frame’ fully automated product dispensers.
  • Product and order verification scanning machines.
  • Automatic storage and retrieval systems for tote bins and pallets.
  • Warehouse management software for manual or automated warehouses delivering:
    • Serial number tracking through automatic recording of data.
    • Expiry date management through stock monitoring and automatic early expiry date detection.
  • Automatic-guided transport systems.
  • Robots for both picking and pallet loading.
  • RF, voice or light directed manual picking to order cartons or pallets.
  • Plastic tote bins for product storage and order delivery.

“Synchronisation between the collector belt and the order totes ensures a continuous stream of automatically picked products, up to 10,000 items an hour.”

Goods-to-person systems

SSI SCHAEFER goods-to-person high productivity picking systems eliminate walking by automatically retrieving products from an automatic storage system and conveying them to an operator at an ergonomically designed pick station. Order totes or cartons are also automatically conveyed in and out of the pick station, allowing the operator to continually fulfil orders without moving from the station. A combination of displays and light curtains ensures high accuracy and productivity. Operators can pick individual items, shelf packs or small cartons at the station.
A-frames

SSI SCHAEFER A-frames automatically dispense pharmaceutical products onto a collector belt that runs through the centre of the A-frame and automatically delivers the collected items into an order tote or carton. Synchronisation between the collector belt and the order totes ensures a continuous stream of automatically picked products, up to 10,000 items an hour, making the A-frame ideal for dealing with fast moving small items in peak times.
Warehouse management software

SSI SCHAEFER’s warehouse management software, WAMAS, intelligently manages the end-to-end processes in both manual and automated distribution centres. WAMAS ensures tight integration between the various automated subsystems and operational processes, and is rich in the functionality required for pharmaceutical distribution, including:

  • Batch-lot & product ID tracking.
  • Check weighing.
  • Order cubing.
  • Route prioritisation.
  • Order consolidation.

WAMAS manages and controls all intralogistics processes including efficient and flexible order processing, goods movement, and resource optimisation, along with the provision and analysis of logistics performance data so critical to the supply chain visibility required by the pharmaceutical industry.
SSI SCHAEFER is a strong partner to the pharmaceutical industry, having worked with many of industry leaders over the last 20 years. Contact SSI SCHAEFER directly for case study evidence. For more information, call +61 2 8799 3600 or visit www.ssi-schaefer.com.
 
 
 
 

The skies are getting greener

Singapore Airlines (SIA) is contributing more to greener skies by further reducing food wastage on board, cutting back on the use of plastics for in-flight items and increasing the use of sustainable ingredients in in-flight meals.
“We are proud to have embarked on a new era of greater sustainability, with an enhanced focus on environmentally responsible practices on board that will significantly reduce our carbon footprint and improve sustainable travel of our customers,” said SIA’s senior vice president customer experience Yeoh Phee Teik.
Cutting down on food waste
SIA currently employs customer surveys, data analytics and staff feedback, and works with its caterers to reduce food wastage after flights.
The airline plans to automate data collection and further leverage technologies such as artificial intelligence and machine learning to better predict customers’ consumption patterns and further reduce cabin food waste.
Through an improved monitoring system of customers’ consumption patterns and data analytics, SIA will be able to better adjust the quantities of certain food items uplifted to minimise wastage without compromising on customer service.
Reducing use of plastics in-flight through alternative sustainable materials
SIA is also committed to reducing the use of single-use plastics with alternative sustainable materials for more in-flight items.
The airline aims to become entirely plastic straw-free by September 2019. Since September 2018, SIA has removed all plastic straws on board, apart from children’s straws. The latter will be substituted with environmentally friendly paper straws. These changes will reduce about 820,000 plastic straws each year. The airline also has plans to replace its current plastic swizzle sticks with wood-based ones by September 2019.
From May 2019, SIA will also be replacing polybags from children’s toys with recyclable paper packaging.
Several of the airline’s paper products, such as menu cards, tissue paper and toilet rolls, are made with FSC-certified paper, which have been sourced in an environmentally and socially responsible manner.
Other upcoming green initiatives include the printing of children’s colouring books and activity kits using eco-friendly soy-based ink.
Sustainable food sourcing
Expanding on the airline’s ‘From Farm to Plane’ concept introduced in 2017, which promotes environmental sustainability and supports local farming communities, SIA will be embarking on an exciting new collaboration with AeroFarms, the world’s largest indoor vertical farm of its kind based in Newark, United States.
Produce at AeroFarms is grown indoors without soil, pesticides or sunlight, using AeroFarms’ award-winning aeroponic technology.
“As vertical farms are not weather dependent but operate under a controlled environment, crops can be grown year-round, thereby increasing the amount of sustainable produce to support more of the Airline’s needs,” Mr Yeoh said.
Aerofarms will provide a customised blend of fresh produce for SIA’s Newark to Singapore flights from September 2019.
“Imagine boarding a plane and enjoying a salad harvested only a few hours before take-off – literally the world’s freshest airline food,” said SIA’s food & beverage director Antony McNeil.
SIA through its catering partner SATS currently sources certain types of produce from two local farms for flights departing Singapore. It plans to work with SATS to identify local vertical farms to work with.
Other ingredients obtained from sustainable sources include selected locally farmed fish from fisheries that are certified by Best Aquaculture Practices (BAP).

IBM’s blockchain-based Food Trust arrives in Australia

Drakes deli team member and AFLW player Ebony Marinoff.

Australia’s largest 100% family-owned meat processor, Thomas Foods International, and largest independent grocery retailer, Drakes Supermarket have signed on as members of the blockchain-based food ecosystem IBM Food Trust. The successful pilot can trace the entire lifecycle of a food product, from region to plate, and update the record in real time. The two South Australian organisations are the first in Australia to pilot IBM Food Trust using the IBM Blockchain Platform, reducing traceability times from three days to three seconds.
The pilot involved tracing the origin of a piece of steak back to one of four individual farms. IBM Food Trust uses blockchain technology to enable participating retailers, suppliers and growers to collaborate based on a shared view of food ecosystem data to enable greater traceability, transparency and efficiency. This is important as it provides increased data granularity, which is an enabler for several use cases. Firstly, in the event of fast, surgical recalls, customers can quickly identify the amount of product at risk with minimised false positives. Secondly, product differentiation, which allows retailers to prove the provenance and history of an individual cut of meat.
Thomas Foods International (TFI) and Drakes Supermarket have been testing IBM Food Trust for the past three months to deliver improvements in day-to-day operational efficiencies. By removing data silos within the organisations and enabling a high level of data granularity, the pilot has enabled data to be shared across organisations. TFI and Drakes are able to upload data into a shared platform and the lifecycle of the products being traced has been mapped across the organisations, allowing a product to be tracked as it moves through the supply chain.
IBM Food Trust members contribute data to the network
Participants such as TFI can upload their data and share with other organisations within their ecosystem. Organisations within the same supply chain can leverage the information of the partners to establish a single, shared version of truth.
Simon Tamke from Thomas Foods International said: “By maintaining the individual data relating to each product instead of moving to data about grouped products, we are achieving a greater understanding of how each food item is moving through the supply chain. This added level of transparency and verifiability will reinforce customers’ and consumers’ confidence in the provenance of our product and is made possible by blockchain technology.
“We are pleased with the steady progress of our blockchain collaboration with IBM, while we continue to receive very positive feedback from the industry and customers,” he added.
Head of Blockchain at IBM Australia and New Zealand Rupert Colchester said: “We see blockchain as a potentially game-changing technology for food traceability. Drakes and Thomas Foods have demonstrated how different players in a single supply chain can securely share data and key events, bridging organisational boundaries for the good of both consumers and the benefit of their own business processes. We expect to see more of this collaboration in the coming year, with groups of partners working together for the benefit of the entire food industry.
“Transparency and traceability are the key to many industries now, and none more so than in the critical issues of food safety and provenance.”
Tim Catwright from Drakes Supermarket said: “The greater level of granularity since adopting IBM Food Trust has enabled the traceability of a food package across the supply chain, reducing the time required to identify the origin of a product from days to just seconds.”
 

DHL’s NSW warehouse attains carbon neutral certification

DHL Supply Chain and Frasers Property Australia have partnered to deliver one of the first carbon neutral industrial buildings, certified under the National Carbon Offset Standard for buildings.
The 17,733 square meter distribution warehouse is located at 227 Walters Road, Arndell Park and was constructed in 2002 by Frasers Property Australia with DHL as its sole tenant.
The industrial building received a 4-Star Green Star rating by the Green Building Council of Australia (GBCA), with sustainability initiatives which include LED lighting upgrades and the installation of a 200kW solar PV system. Furthermore, forklift charging is also staggered to reduce peak demand.
“Our goal, under Deutsche Post DHL Group’s GoGreen environmental protection program, is to get to zero logistics-related emissions by 2050. Receiving this 4-star rating underscores our ongoing commitment to achieving this ambitious target. We are however aware that we can only succeed in meeting our target by working closely with like-minded partners such as Fraser Property, who are equally focused on its own carbon neutral goals,” Saul Resnick, CEO, DHL Supply Chain Australia & New Zealand said.
“Frasers Property has a target to reach carbon zero emissions, in line with sciencebased targets by 2028. DHL was a natural fit for a carbon neutral partnership as they too have a mission to achieve zero emissions status. A partnership was essential for achieving carbon neutral certification, and it is a testament to the importance of building relationships with our customers. We are already a certified carbon neutral organisation under the National Carbon Offset Standard, meaning that we had the expertise to bring this partnership to life,” Chamoun Malki, General Manager, Investment Property for Frasers Property Australia said.

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