DHL transport & distribution training program

Express and logistics company DHL has partnered with JJ Cahill Memorial High School in Sydney to offer year 11 students a two year, school-based traineeship in transport and distribution.

Launched this week, the vocational education training (VET) program, which will be taught as part of the school curriculum, will give students who complete Certificate II in Transport & Distribution the skills they need to work in the express and logistic industry.

Students who enrol in the course over years 11 and 12 will spend a minimum of 100 days of paid employment on-the job over the period.

Student Trent Dale, who is undertaking the program, explains that he wants to gain work experience while still at school.

“I think it will provide more career options for me to follow after school and my parents are proud and happy for me,” he says

Mrs. Linda Clinch, HR Manager, DHL Express Oceania says partnering with JJ Cahill Memorial High School to offer a subject that combines theory and experience in the burgeoning freight and logistics industry could not have come at a better time.

“Due to globalisation, declining trade barriers and greater network connectivity, the industry continues to enjoy above average growth.”

“Students at JJ Cahill Memorial High School who complete the Certificate II in Transport & Distribution will have a head start on the skills they need to begin their career in this dynamic industry,” Clinch says.

As part of the program, students will learn how to prioritise courier and delivery operations, safely use manual handling methods and customer service skills.

The aim is to help smooth the transition from school to the workforce.

“Through the program, we have been able to provide greater opportunities for students and enrich the experiences of our own staff,” Clinch says.

DHL transport & distribution training program

Express and logistics company DHL has partnered with JJ Cahill Memorial High School in Sydney to offer year 11 students a two year, school-based traineeship in transport and distribution.

Launched this week, the vocational education training (VET) program, which will be taught as part of the school curriculum, will give students who complete Certificate II in Transport & Distribution the skills they need to work in the express and logistic industry.

Students who enrol in the course over years 11 and 12 will spend a minimum of 100 days of paid employment on-the job over the period.

Student Trent Dale, who is undertaking the program, explains that he wants to gain work experience while still at school.

“I think it will provide more career options for me to follow after school and my parents are proud and happy for me,” he says

Mrs. Linda Clinch, HR Manager, DHL Express Oceania says partnering with JJ Cahill Memorial High School to offer a subject that combines theory and experience in the burgeoning freight and logistics industry could not have come at a better time.

“Due to globalisation, declining trade barriers and greater network connectivity, the industry continues to enjoy above average growth.”

“Students at JJ Cahill Memorial High School who complete the Certificate II in Transport & Distribution will have a head start on the skills they need to begin their career in this dynamic industry,” Clinch says.

As part of the program, students will learn how to prioritise courier and delivery operations, safely use manual handling methods and customer service skills.

The aim is to help smooth the transition from school to the workforce.

“Through the program, we have been able to provide greater opportunities for students and enrich the experiences of our own staff,” Clinch says.

Infrastructure Australia Chair welcomed

The Australian Logistics Council has warmly welcomed the appointment of Sir Rod Eddington as the inaugural chair of Infrastructure Australia.

“Sir Rod Eddington brings global perspective and experience from his extensive career in the domestic and international transport industry to this vital role as chair of Infrastructure Australia,” says Hal Morris, Chief Executive of the Australian Logistics Council.

“Infrastructure Australia is a critical innovation, ensuring the Australian Government takes a long term, comprehensive view of the infrastructure needs of our Nation.’

“Transport and Logistics underpins the Australian economy, impacting on every aspect of Australians’ lives.”

“It is worth 14.5 per cent of our GDP, or $150 billion each year to our national bottom line employing an estimated 1.5 million Australians,” Morris says.

“Importantly, however, every industry in our nation relies on the transport and logistics industry to deliver, on time and in full in order to do their jobs.”

“Improving Australia’s transport network and infrastructure will therefore be central to Infrastructure Australia role.”

“The ALC and the transport and logistics industry is pleased to see Sir Rod Eddington appointed chair as he has a comprehensive and multi-modal experience particularly in the aviation industry.”

“Decisions on our transport networks, as well as other critical national infrastructure, are too important to get wrong,” Morris adds.

“Sir Rod Eddington’s appointment today is a big step on in the right direction by the Rudd Government and Minister Albanese.”

10 Ways CRM can improve sales and operations

According to Melinda Elmowy, Executive Vice President of Global Marketing for CargoWise ™ edi, a leading provider of integrated international supply chain logistics management systems, the Customer Relationship Management (CRM) and sales process for freight and logistics is considerably more complex in today’s dynamic global business environment than it has been in the past.

For instance, Elmowy says the buying decision has moved from the shipping dock and traffic department to C-level influencers.

“The entire CRM process as it relates to freight forwarding has evolved and requires more advanced IT tools to support this new paradigm,” says Elmowy.

“There are a number of IT solutions available that can be applied horizontally across a variety of industries to automate the sales process and manage it through CRM.”

“Most are adequate solutions. However, for logistics providers, the optimal solution is an integrated ERP system that applies this discipline vertically,” she says.

“This is especially important for the freight forwarding industry, where CRM is an integral part of the supply chain solution as it relates to running the entire company — from sales prospecting, to quotes, operations, finance and an optimized logistics process.”

Elmowy identifies 10 areas of supply chain functionality that can ensure an effective CRM process:

  1. Identify a Single Solution for Management Visibility

In many cases there are fragmented communications solutions that may serve one business segment more than another, and require multiple data entry.

Supply chain visibility can be better accomplished by a single solution that integrates information from both sales and operations.

With integrated information, sales reps can enter critical data that is used to facilitate increased sales and customer service by monitoring project status and meeting customer deadlines.

Operations management is then able to utilize the same, uniform information for reporting and oversight without requiring additional data entry.

Offering management visibility is a by-product of the sales effort, but invaluable to ongoing operations.

2. Establish Effective Freight-specific Marketing Tools

Key to improving CRM and increasing sales is continually building the sales funnel through effective marketing to both existing customers and prospects.

A proper freight CRM process can target marketing efforts based on attributes that only freight-specific CRM can deliver: shipment activity, lane segments, trade profiles, deliverables, etc.

3. Institute Data Efficiencies

Sales and marketing is the first contact with the customer/prospect.

Prospects turn into quoting opportunities, shipments and revenue.

If a customer record is entered into a CRM tool, then into a separate freight system, and then a financial system, there is no integrated efficiency developed beyond the original point of origin.

IT solutions with an integrated CRM process enables sales, operations, and finance to work from the same records, increasing companywide operating efficiencies.

4. Ensure Data Quality through a Single System

Data quality is even more of an issue for companies than efficiency.

Changing customer organization details, contacts, and procedures is an administrative nightmare with multiple data systems within a company.

A single data system with a common point of customer input ensures the entire team — from sales through operations to finance — has access to the same updated information to ensure a seamless flow of quality information.

5. Improve the Customer Experience

The sales process begins with your company contact sitting down across the desk from a prospect customer asking for business and committing to SOPs.

Communicating these SOPs to operations and adhering to them is difficult.

An integrated CRM solution extends beyond sales, allowing a customer profile to be established that includes operations.

A properly integrated CRM solution does not require sales to send memos, but rather enables the system to automatically inform operations of the dos and don’ts of managing that account.

6. Create Sales Management Visibility

Sales and CRM effectiveness are ultimately measured with numbers.

Management needs visibility of sales efforts to evaluate operating performance and strategy.

Asking what issues are affecting sales is an important element in establishing management visibility of the operating process.

Is there a common theme that can lead to opportunities if addressed? How many calls are being made; what is the call cycle for major accounts; how does the sales funnel look for the next week, month, quarter, and year?

These are all metrics that can be harvested from any good CRM process, but an integrated CRM procedure enables these items to be segmented by quotation, customer, SOP, trade lane, tonnage, destination point and delivery date, creating accurate reporting information throughout the entire sales and marketing system.

7. Establish Quoting and Communications Guidelines

Accurate quoting is the second, and often the most important step, in obtaining business for your company.

This can be as simple as a one-time ad hoc shipment or as complex as a request for a detailed proposed rate study.

Everything your sales department has done up until that point must be accessible to sales and operations for quoting.

An integrated IT-based CRM program ensures a more efficient and effective quoting and communications process by permitting real-time cross-functional accessibility to client data by the various business segments involved in the sales and operational processes.

8. Ensure Transparent Data Repository

A properly utilized CRM process offers transparency to the customer relationship within a logistics operation.

Ultimately relationships are between the customer and the logistics company, not individuals.

An integrated CRM process provides for a smooth transition in the event of staffing changes or employee turnover.

9. Improve Financial Visibility

Your sales department needs a single point of access for client intelligence, quoting visibility, and financial visibility.

A single, integrated CRM system will provide this, while ensuring security and giving access only to the information required in order to complete specific tasks necessary within the supply chain process.

10. Institute an Effective Sales Process

The obvious and most important value question asked about CRM should be: “Does our CRM process help sales reps work more efficiently and increase customer interface, or does it detract from time spent pursuing prospects to enter additional information needed by sales management and operations?”

An effective CRM effort generates comprehensive, relevant reports and permits the sales process to increase the time spent with customer interaction.

An integrated CRM system seamlessly benefits sales management and operations on the backend without redundant entry by sales.

It enables sales to manage customers, develop call cycles, and become more efficient as a company.

An inadequate CRM tool will be met with resistance. A good CRM process self-perpetuates with sales and customers.

As the sales department sees their efforts integrating into the calendar, eliminating manual call reporting, and offering their customers better results through customer service, they realize it maximizes their earning potential…just don’t tell them it is a management tool.

“Following these essential guidelines in establishing the right single-source CRM solution enables the sales team to be more efficient and sell more, while providing the entire sales team with virtually seamless visibility throughout the CRM process,” says Elmowy.

“In doing so,
it provides operational management with a clear view of what is happening throughout the entire freight logistics process and helps improve your company’s supply chain efficiency and ROI.”

Fan-forced hard hats

An active cooling system for hard hats to be released at Safety in Action will combat heat stress suffered by Australian workers.

Heat stress in Australia is a significant problem.

In the mining industry it has been a concern for most of the century due to the serious medical consequences and the detrimental effects on productivity.

Research recognises that the effective thermoregulation of the body achieved by evaporation is significantly hindered by the use of hard hats which restrict air circulation and increase the thermal load on the body.

And according to the Harvard Medical School, around 30 per cent of a person’s body heat is attributed to the head, meaning that hard hats are a significant contributor to heat stress.

WorkFlow is a Lithium-powered fan that channels air into the cavity space of a hard hat.

A computer chip embedded in the device, controls a time-released blast of air to cool the air trapped in the helmet, which allows the body to cool itself naturally through evaporative cooling.

Lightweight and very manageable, WorkFlow has been used abroad in industries and regions most susceptible to heat stress.

WorkFlow has proven to lessen the risks associated with heat stress (the major cause for employees becoming uncomfortable and making poor decisions, reducing their productivity and compromising their safety), now recognised as a significant workers’ compensation issue.

Wrights Hardware Pty Ltd is the exclusive agent for WorkFlow in Australia and New Zealand, which will be launched at Safety In Action in Melbourne from April 29 to May 1 at the Melbourne Exhibition Centre.

For further details please contact Wrights Hardware on 1300 731 336

Pearson installs IBS software

IBS Australia has signed an agreement with Pearson, a leading international media company, for the installation of Bookmaster, IBS’ publishing and book distribution solution, in four European countries.

The planned installation includes software, services and hardware with a total value of 4.5 million Euros ($7.2 million).

Pearson, one of the world’s leading media organisations, first installed IBS Bookmaster, a software solution designed specifically for publishers and book distributors, in Australia in 1991.

Today, the software is used in Pearson’s publishing and book distribution operations in Australia, New Zealand, Hong Kong, Singapore, Malaysia, India and South Africa, with Korea and Taiwan scheduled to go live in 2008 and Japan in 2009.

Based on Pearson’s positive experiences from their relationship with IBS in Asia, Australasia and Africa, Pearson has decided to expand the installation of the software to include four additional locations in Europe including Benelux, Spain and Poland.

In total, 260 concurrent users will use IBS Bookmaster, which covers everything from editorial and bookproduction, to distribution, warehouse management, e-commerce, business intelligence and royalties.

“Pearson is currently using several different systems in Europe,” says Mike Irving, VP Publishing, IBS.

“By establishing common business processes across these countries Pearson will increase efficiency and visibility in their operations and will be able to provide even better customer service.”

“IBS Bookmaster is an excellent fit for Pearson and we believe that our extensive understanding of publishing and book distribution will help them get the most out of this new implementation,” he says.

“We are very excited about extending our relationship with Pearson, one of the world’s leading publishers, because it will help us continue to develop Bookmaster to meet and exceed the current and future requirements of the global publishing industry,” Irving adds.

Pearson is an international media company with a world leading business in education, business information and consumer publishing.

The company has some of the most valuable and recognisable brands in the media world, such as the Financial Times, Penguin and Prentice Hall.

Pearson is listed on the London and New York stock exchanges, has 29,000 employees in 60 countries and had a turnover of £4,423 m in 2006.

Read more about Pearson at www.pearson.com

Read more about IBS Australia

Track and trace to Mars

Limited only by existing technology, outer space is truly the next frontier for human exploration.

In the coming decades the US National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is planning manned trips back to the moon and to Mars by 2020.

In order to accomplish these goals, NASA is investing in research into new technologies such as RFID that can make space travel over such distances more feasible.

Part of this research involves a program called the Material International Space Station Experiment (MISSE).

The idea of the MISSE Program is to provide economical opportunities to test new technologies in space using the International Space Station.

This will also reduce the risks of using the technologies on a critical mission for the first time.

The program is managed by NASA’s Langley Research Center with involvement from the US Air Force Research Lab, US Naval Research Lab, and a number of universities and aerospace companies.

Three MISSEs have been completed (MISSEs 1, 2, and 5), two MISSEs (MISSEs 3 and 4) are currently in space on the Space Station and they will be returned in mid summer this year.

Two MISSEs (MISSEs 6A and 6B) are being made ready for launch late this year.

These MISSEs will test thousands of specimens of materials, optical devices, solar cells, and other components that are planned for use on future space missions.

Some of the items that are being tested as part of an upcoming MISSE experiment will be Gen2 passive RFID tags manufactured by Intermec Technologies.

At present both soft and hard tags are being tested for their suitability to be used on future space missions.

The tags will be placed in a case connected to the outside of the International Space Station and left there for approximately one year.

They will be exposed to extreme heat and cold, ultraviolet radiation, atomic oxygen and the vacuum of space. Astronauts will perform visual inspections of the materials, and also take photographs.

After a year, the tags will be returned to Earth on the space shuttle and tested using commercially available Intermec readers in the clean room at NASA’s Atmospheric Systems Development Laboratory at the Langley Research Center in Virginia to evaluate whether they are still functioning.

Other materials being tested for MISSE include radiation shielding, thermal control coatings, thermal protection materials such as ablative and ceramic matrix composites, and others.

“The prospect of utilising RFID technology for manned space flight is very promising at this stage,” says Fred Schramm, Administrator for the Internal Research and Development Program at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, AL, USA.

“The astronauts are limited in which parts of the spacecraft can be reached after takeoff, and also are limited by the hours in the day.”

“They do not have time or the capability to visually inspect every component on the ship, or to log every item of equipment.”

“RFID has the potential to do this for them,” he says.

RFID tags installed on space-borne vessels will potentially have a number of benefits.

For instance, if an astronaut is trying to find a misplaced tool that has been tagged, it can easily be located anywhere in the ship.

RFID can even help with things as simple as monitoring food and water supplies by logging each time a packet of food or water is taken.

Detailed records of movements of objects can be recorded automatically.

If RFID proves to be effective in outer space, it will result in a large amount of time saving for astronauts who can dedicate their energy to other tasks such as maintaining the vessel and performing scientific experiments.

Each part being remotely monitored, and having the ability to maintain a log of where every part and piece of equipment has been throughout an entire voyage will also be invaluable in terms of improving efficiency as well as safety.

Intermec and NASA have been working together for years.

Intermec set up the world’s largest wireless LAN at Kennedy Space Center which allows NASA personnel to locate 300,000 pieces of mission critical equipment anywhere on the premises instantly.

Additionally, Intermec is working with NASA to apply 2D symbology barcodes to aerospace parts, making them easier to scan form virtually any distance and angle.

The two organisations are also working together to create read-through paint sensors to scan symbols hidden from view for aesthetic and security reasons.

Intermec and NASA have a long history of collaboration in creating new technologies that have uses in both space travel and earthbound use.

Participation in the MISSE programme is just the latest phase of that collaboration.

Intermec expects MISSE to show just how advanced RFID technology has become and how diverse the applications for it are.

“Intermec has proven itself in the past as willing to work with us to develop unique solutions to unique challenges,” Schramm says.

NASA is also working with Intermec and other partners on a futuristic solution that would enable RFID tags to be directly marked on parts using a thin film process.

Known as Vacuum Arc Vapor Deposition (VAVD), the system would enable all the materials needed for an RFID tag to be deposited directly onto an object.

That object could be anything from a fence post to a moon rock to a mission-critical part of the space shuttle. There is currently a prototype handheld device being tested which can carry out the VAVD process, which is being licensed by Chemco of Dalton, GA, USA.

The advantages of using VAVD for RFID tags are extensive.

Firstly, there is no risk of tags falling off as the tag itself will be built into the object it is tracking.

Additionally, every gram that is sent into space increase the cost of the voyage, and means something else, such as fuel or foodstuffs, must be sacrificed.

A tag applied with VAVD would weigh less than a soft tag, and much less than a hard tag, reducing this problem, especially when there are potentially thousands of tags needed for a mission. Potential suppliers are currently being evaluated for producing the VAVD equipment.

“VAVD could be an ideal solution to the problem of too much weight being added by rigid RFID tags and unreliability on a long term deployment, such as a mission to Mars, with soft tags,” Schramm says.

“This process, once perfected, also has a wealth of potential applications here on Earth in a whole range of industries.”

The reason VAVD could be so useful in a range of industries is the large volume of materials that can be marked directly using this process.

These include everything from silicon to copper to aluminium, and anything else used to create a circuit.

The other reason is that it can be used on such a huge range of objects. In tests, object as diverse as credit cards, feathers, glass, paper, and rock have been marked.

RFID is the first real life application of VAVD as a spray on circuit, so its success or failure will have a huge impact on the future of the technology.

Potentially though, VAVD will enable materials to be applied for the production of ultra-thin memory devices ranging from nanometres to microns thick.

The MISSE programme is just another new testing ground for another potential application of RFID technology.

The fact that NASA, which creates and utilises some of the most advanced technology on the planet has invested in sending the technology to space speaks volumes about RFID’s potential, and its future.

Infrastructure bill announced

The Minister for Infrastructure, Transport, Regional Development and Local Government, Anthony Albanese, last week introduced his Infrastructure Australia Bill into Parliament with a speech that looked back to Labor icon Ben Chifley and the Snowy Mountains Scheme.

Infrastructure Australia will be a statutory advisory council that will develop a strategic blueprint for Australia’s future infrastructure needs.

Mr Albanese says its immediate task would be to undertake a national infrastructure audit to determine the condition of Australia’s nationally significant infrastructure, including water, energy, transport and communications.

“The audit will identify gaps, deficiencies, impediments and bottlenecks across these important sectors of the national economy as well as take into account expected future demand,” he says.

“This information will inform the development of the infrastructure priority list to guide future investment decisions.”

Mr Albanese says the first priority list will be completed within 12 months and presented to CoAG in March 2009.

“In addition, Infrastructure Australia will be expected to provide advice on regulatory reforms that can improve the utilisation of existing infrastructure and streamline new proposals,” he says.

“It will propose ways to harmonise legislation and regulation across jurisdictions.”

The Infrastructure Australia council will have twelve members, including five from the private sector.

The council will be chaired by one of these private sector representatives.

Under the Bill, the councillors will all be required to have knowledge of, or experience in, a field relevant to Infrastructure Australia’s functions.

The Australian Trucking Association has welcomed the establishment of Infrastructure Australia, but will defend the Government’s road funding from attempts to divert it to other infrastructure projects.

These other projects should be funded by increasing the overall amount of spending on infrastructure, not by taking money away from roads.

Rugged Industrial Strength Handheld Readers

Datalogic Scanning has released the PowerScan® 8000 Series of rugged industrial-strength handheld readers.

This series is designed and constructed to withstand the toughest environmental conditions and deliver performance to satisfy the most demanding applications.

The PowerScan 8000 Series of handheld readers come with your choice of corded or cordless models, standard or auto range laser with a range of few centimetres to over 10 meters, and a 2D mega-pixel sensor for omni-directional reading of 1D, stacked, and 2D bar codes.

Outstanding characteristics include ruggedness, durability and the ability to withstand extreme environmental conditions.

The Series also has additional optics and interfaces make this new product suitable for any application in the industrial market.

Operator comfort is essential in any scan-intensive application and has also been considered.

The PowerScan 8000 delivers unsurpassed ease-of-use with its improved ergonomically designed handle and well-balanced weight.

For unmatched feedback in noisy environments, and superior good read feedback from any position, the high-performance Datalogic 3GLT Technology (Three Green Lights) incorporates “GreenSpotT” Technology as well as “Double Good-Read LEDT” Technology.

The 3GL Technology is a distinctive characteristic of all PowerScan 8000 industrial handheld readers, showcasing the latest innovations in handheld reader technology by Datalogic.

“Now customers can take advantage of the very best technology the industry has to offer,” says Pietro Todescato, General Manager of Handheld Readers for Datalogic Scanning.

“The new PowerScan series synthesizes and further enhances the ten years of design, technology, and experience based upon the PowerScan, DragonT, and LynxT handheld readers.”

“The new reader builds upon our long legacy of success and a demonstrated track-record of proven performance in demanding environments.”

The operator’s mobility is crucial in industrial applications, not only to increase efficiency, but to optimise safety.

The Datalogic STAR cordless systemT increases productivity and flexibility in the work area by offering scalable solutions, from simple point-to-point applications to more complex networks and seamless roaming projects.

Both an input and an output device, the powerful bi-directional communication protocol of the PowerScan 8000 handheld reader, combined with an optional display and three push-button keypad not only allow the operator to receive information, but to also actively interact with the host.

Datalogic Scanning has long been a pioneer in cordless handheld technology offering the broadest line of cordless scanners available today.

Facts about Datalogic Scanning Handheld Readers

  • A Datalogic Scanning bar code reader is installed every 36 seconds.
  • 440,000 PowerScan® industrial handheld readers have been sold since 1998.
  • 200,000 DragonT industrial handheld readers have been sold since 2000.
  • Over 2.5 million Datalogic handheld readers have been sold since 1998.
  • Over 30,000 customers have chosen Datalogic Scanning handheld

For additional information

Incidents bring home crucial safety message

QR is reinforcing the crucial safety message for people not to risk their lives around level crossings and rail corridors following a series of incidents.

The warning comes after a vehicle struck a boom gate at Beaudesert Road at Rocklea, in Brisbane’s south, in the lead up to afternoon peak hour period on Thursday February 14.

The boom gate was knocked off its foundation and passenger services were severely disrupted, with Beenleigh and Gold Coast trains delayed by up to half an hour.

Meanwhile, a car was believed to have collided with a loaded coal train near Sugar Shed Road level crossing in the Mackay region shortly before 10pm on Sunday January 27.

The flashing lights at this level crossing were operating correctly at the time.

QR CEO Lance Hockridge says while it was lucky no one was injured during both incidents, the consequences could have been far worse.

“We are appealing for people to take special care and obey all traffic signals when they approach level crossings,” he says.

“We have had a lot of wet weather lately and people have to be more vigilant than ever.”

“Motorists and pedestrians need to be aware that the same rules apply at rail level crossings as normal road intersections and they need to obey the road rules for their own, and the rail operator’s, safety.”

Hockridge says although the number of level crossing collisions across Queensland has dropped about 30 per cent over the last decade, one collision is one too many.

“On average in Queensland there are 17 needless collisions a year between a road user and a train at rail level crossings and half of these incidents happen at protected level crossings that have flashing lights, boom gates or both,” Hockridge says.

He also urges the public not to trespass on rail corridors and only use designated safe crossing points.

“Too many times there are near misses because pedestrians take short cuts, or blatantly disregard warning signs and safety infrastructure,” he says.

“The safety of QR staff and our drivers in particular is also at risk because of reckless behaviour near the tracks.”

“People should consider the impact on our staff both in terms of injury and trauma of accidents and near misses.”

http://www.qr.com.au/

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