Minus 35C: fully automated warehouse for blood plasma

Jungheinrich has implemented a comprehensive intralogistics concept in Dublin, Ireland, for the global healthcare company Grifols.
One of the special features is a cold store warehouse with a capacity for 1,152 pallets and a temperature range of down to minus 35 degrees Celsius, suitable for the safe stacking and retrieval of blood plasma.
The stacker crane, which is specially configured for use in extreme temperature conditions, reaches a height of 14.3 metres. Jungheinrich also designed special quadruple-depth storage channels for Grifols. The load is handled crossways by a double shuttle.
The second single-aisle, high-bay silo warehouse is set to a temperature of plus 5 degrees Celsius and can accommodate 2,972 pallets. The stacker crane operating here reaches a ceiling height of up to 26 metres.
The entire warehouse complex in Dublin was designed for the transport and safe storage of medical devices on both Euro and US pallets (1219 x 1016 mm) and is controlled by the Jungheinrich Warehouse Control System (WCS). The new automated system is arranged to reliably meet the high demands for storage technology and safety that are inherent in the storage of delicate blood plasma and medical devices. In order to meet these demands, Jungheinrich’s comprehensive intralogistics installation covered all of the administrative processes in Grifols medical supply chain as well as the compulsory final quality controls.

Emergent Cold collaborates with tech firm on analytics

The temperature-controlled supply chain company that recently purchased Swire Cold Storage, Emergent Cold, has signed a Heads of Agreement with technology company irexchange, to support the next phase of growth for both businesses.
The Agreement outlines a collaboration between Emergent Cold and irexchange that will provide temperature-controlled flow-through distribution-centre transport and fulfilment capability to irexchange, initially within Victoria and then nationally. irexchange is to provide technology and analytical capabilities to facilitate the creation of a next-generation temperature-controlled supply chain capability.
The Agreement with Emergent Cold will support irexchange’s growth into fresh and perishable products and enable irexchange to broaden its customer base.
“We are pleased to partner with irexchange to develop the next generation of supply-chain capability in the temperature-controlled market, especially for smaller independent retailers,” said Greg Holt, Managing Director, Emergent Cold Australia. “There are great synergies between Emergent Cold’s capability and the irexchange platform and technology which we look forward to realising.”
Clive Yoxall, CEO, irexchange, added: “We are continuing to build our efficient world-class network and national footprint. With this agreement, we will deepen our support capabilities across the independent grocery and smaller retailer sectors. Our new relationship with Emergent Cold is a significant and important milestone and we are confident that both our organisations will generate strong and sustained value through the partnership.”

Lighting expert Aqualuma on display at MEGATRANS2018

Aqualuma, expert in LED lighting solutions for commercial and marine applications, will exhibit at MEGATRANS2018 – a new trade show focusing on the national and international supply chain.
The business specialises in a range of LED products for the wider industrial sector, including for warehouses, cold stores and exterior applications to name a few.

TMHA equips new NewCold Melbourne facilities

Toyota Material Handling Australia (TMHA) has supplied equipment to new cold storage market entrant, NewCold.
NewCold Melbourne opened its two warehouses in August and September, with 45 leased Toyota and BT forklifts.
Netherlands-based NewCold Advanced Cold Logistics reportedly decided to approach TMHA for its first Australian operations due to its relations with Toyota in Europe.
The 34-metre-high warehouses have a combined 40,800m2 of floor area, storage for over 200,000 pallets, 39 loading docks and operate around the clock.
One is a cold store at minus 23oC, the other a chilled store with two, eight and 11oC environments.
“This makes Toyota our material handling partner of choice, while the comprehensive service offering is unique and cost effective as well,” said Ray Perry, Director – Oceania, NewCold.
“We appreciate that Toyota does not only supply the forklift [equipment] but will also service the equipment as and when we need it.
“Being a logistics and warehouse service provider, Toyota shares common customer values with NewCold. We trust that we will benefit from TMHA’s wealth of knowledge in the industry in Australia to increase our productivity, while staying ahead of our competition.”
Jason Fennell, Corporate Account Manager at TMHA, said local discussions with NewCold began in October 2016 and a decision was made in May 2017.
“We received a request to assist NewCold from our corporate division and worked from there,” he said.
“NewCold uses a variety of suppliers and products in Europe. However, the core business is to be able to pick orders, replenish stock, load and unload required deliveries, and store required long-life stocks on a 24/7 basis.
“This is the company’s first development in Australia, so we are committed to working with them to develop the relationship and ensure we cover all the material handling requirements, as well as making this process easy for the customer.”
The initial equipment roster for NewCold’s Melbourne facilities includes 21 BT electric pallet jacks, 10 Toyota 8-Series FBE18 three-wheel electric forklifts, seven BT RRE140H reach trucks, four Toyota 32-8FG30 internal combustion forklifts, a pair of 32-8FG18 Toyota forklifts, a BT RRE250H reach truck and four battery chargers.

Laverton Cold Storage announces expansion

Cold storage service provider Laverton Cold Storage has committed to doubling the size of its recently completed facility located in Truganina in Melbourne’s west, an expansion that will increase the building area of the first-stage development to over 12,000m2.
Laverton Cold Storage completed a 5,920m2 state-of-the-art, temperature-controlled warehouse and blast freezer building in 2015. The expansion, set to be complete in November 2017, will increase its area by 6,520m2.
The expansion will provide additional storage capabilities and expand the facility’s range of temperature-controlled zones for separate product types.
“This most recent expansion highlights our growth and is a testament to the level of service we have been able to provide our existing customer base from our new site,” said Richard Ralph, Managing Director, Laverton Cold Storage. “It has also provided us the opportunity to attract new clients, and we are looking forward to having the fully completed site operational as we amp up for the Christmas period.”
This expansion will focus on environmentally sustainable design, in particular, the use of significant solar power to reduce Laverton Cold Storage’s operating costs and footprint over the term of its lease.
Consultancy firm TM Insight partnered with Laverton Cold Storage in the design and delivery of both stages of developing the purpose-built cold logistics facility.
“The developments have been specifically designed to allow Laverton Cold Storage to offer greater storage capacities in an efficient and optimal manner, while also adhering to the lean principles and cold-chain compliance,” said Nathan Bingham, Director, TM Insight.
“Due to the service Laverton Cold Storage provides, it was also imperative that we focused on sustainable design to ensure operational and energy efficiencies. These cost saving will no doubt provide a competitive advantage.”

VIC storage leasers may be eligible for refund

Companies leasing warehouse facilities in Victoria may be entitled to a refund from their landlords thanks to a recent decision made by the Victorian Supreme Court of Appeal.
Essentially, the Court held that the lease of premises used to provide cold storage and logistics services was a ‘retail lease’ for the purposes of the Retail Leases Act 2003 (Vic), Hunt & Hunt lawyers has shared.
Hunt & Hunt noted that the decision has practical implications for warehouse operators and freight forwarders, making many entitled to repayment of expenses including land tax and repair costs going back six years.
The Retail Leases Act impacts all aspects of the formation, operation and ending of covered leases. In terms of costs for tenants, landlords are not able to pass on land tax liability or legal costs associated with the preparation of leases, and
landlord are responsible for maintaining premises in the same condition as at the beginning of the lease, this includes equipment, appliances and fittings provided on the premises under the lease.
For the case that brought about the decision, IMCC Group (Australia) Pty Ltd v CB Cold Storage Pty Ltd [2017], the Court had to consider whether a lease of premises used to operate cool storage facilities would be classed as a retail lease.
“The landlord argued it was not due largely to the nature of the services provided and the fact that almost all of the tenant’s customers were businesses,” Hunt & Hunt shared. “The Court of Appeal held that the lease was a retail lease and took the following factors into account: any person could purchase the storage services if the appropriate fee was paid; the tenant’s business was open during normal business hours; and the tenants customers were the actual consumers of the storage service.”
The Court was reportedly not concerned that the premises were acquired for a business purpose.
Hunt & Hunt advises that the criteria for ascertaining whether a warehousing and logistics business’ lease is eligible to be classified as retail will include the rental amount, the size of the premises, whether customers can attend the premises, the hours of operation, the services provided and the permitted use of the premises under the lease.
“Every tenant that provides warehousing and logistics services should have their lease reviewed to determine whether it is potentially a retail lease,” Hunt & Hunt noted. “If it is a retail lease under the law, but the tenant has been paying land tax and maintenance and essential safety maintenance costs, there may be a very strong case to demand repayment of those costs from the landlord.”

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