Maersk sets net Zero Co2 emission target by 2050

Aimed at accelerating the transition to carbon neutral shipping, Maersk has announced its goal to reach carbon neutrality by 2050.
The company said that to achieve this goal, carbon neutral vessels must be commercially viable by 2030, and an acceleration in new innovations and adaption of new technology is required.
Climate is one of the most important issues in the world, and carrying around 80 per cent of global trade, the shipping industry is vital to finding solutions, said the company. Maersk’s relative CO2 emissions have been reduced by 46 per cent(baseline 2007), approx. 9 per cent more than the industry average.
As world trade and thereby shipping volumes will continue to grow, efficiency improvements on the current fossil based technology can only keep shipping emissions at current levels but not reduce them significantly or eliminate them, the company said.
“The only possible way to achieve the so-much-needed decarbonisation in our industry is by fully transforming to new carbon neutral fuels and supply chains,” Søren Toft, Chief Operating Officer at A.P. Moller – Maersk said.
Maersk is putting its efforts towards solving problems specific to maritime transport, as it calls for different solutions than automotive, rail and aviation. The yet to come electric truck is expected to be able to carry max 2 TEU and is projected to run 800km per charging. In comparison, a container vessel carrying thousands of TEU sailing from Panama to Rotterdam makes around 8800km. With short battery durability and no charging points along the route, innovative developments are imperative.
Given the 20-25-year life time of a vessel, the company says it is now time to join forces and start developing the new type of vessels that will be crossing the seas in 2050.

Is freight transport ready for stricter CO2 targets?

One of the world’s largest logistics service providers and operator of Europe’s largest land transport network, DB Schenker, has committed itself to stricter CO2 reduction targets for commercial vehicles over 7.5 tonnes.
“I believe that more can be done and more must be done,” said DB Schenker CEO Jochen Thewes, on the occasion of Deutsche Bahn’s ‘Green November’ initiative. “To encourage the forthcoming structural transformation in the automotive industry and the availability of alternative drive technologies in freight transport as well, I consider the ambitious CO2 reduction targets for commercial vehicles of 20% by 2025 and 35% by 2030 to be absolutely feasible.
Having joined the global climate initiative EV100, DB Schenker recently decided to gradually convert its own fleet of distribution vehicles to electromobility. The objective is to retrofit all vehicles up to 3.5 tonnes with electric drives or fuel cells by 2030. Half of all vehicles weighing between 3.5 and 7.5 tonnes will also be electrically powered by then. Even today, DB Schenker already operates electric transport vehicles in Austria, Italy and Norway as well as electric cargo bikes in a dozen European cities.
Action is therefore required in particular with regard to trucks weighing over 7.5 tonnes: “Everyone must participate, including and especially the manufacturers. We need to make the long overdue technological leap in the imminent structural transformation in the automotive industry,” Mr Thewes said.
In addition, a pilot project in Germany together with MAN and Fresenius University is currently testing the efficiency of digitally controlled truck convoys, also known as platooning. Together with the Swedish start-up Einride, the world’s first electric and fully autonomous truck was recently put into commercial operation.
On 14 November the EU Parliament will vote on CO2 targets for freight transport. The decision will be based on a proposal by the European Commission to reduce CO2 emissions by 15 per cent by 2025 and 30 per cent by 2030. Earlier this year DB Schenker and other companies already advocated more ambitious CO2 targets for commercial vehicles of -20 per cent by 2025 and -35 per cent by 2030.

Transport emissions jump: bring on electric power

Volvo Penta’s chief technology officer Johan Carlsson and system engineer Karin Åkman discuss innovation for electromobility at the company’s new development-and-test laboratory in Gothenburg.

The latest quarterly edition of the National Energy Emissions Audit by The Australia Institute’s Climate & Energy Program shows Australian transport emissions are ramping up thanks to a significant increase in diesel usage.
“We’re seeing little if any further reduction in electricity generation emissions, this combined with continuing growth in diesel consumption, are likely to cause energy emissions to increase – not reduce.” said Dr Hugh Saddler, energy expert and author of the Audit.
“Improving electricity efficiency and replacing coal with renewables is the cheapest way to cut national emissions, yet the National Energy Guarantee’s 26 per cent target seeks to reverse this,
“Fossil fuel use for electricity and transport accounts for nearly three quarters of Australia’s emissions. Australia is an outliner globally, with no mandatory emissions or fuel economy standards for vehicles, leaving transport emissions to climb. While diesel cars help drivers save money based on fuel efficiency, using diesel emits around 17 per cent more than petrol by volume and now accounts for half of all petroleum emissions.
“Unless the Australian Government takes action on emissions standards, we will continue to drive up emission in the transport sector with one of the least efficient, highest emission motor vehicle fleets in the world.”
The report also showed Australia’s annual energy emissions decreased in the first quarter of 2018, thanks to the closure of the highly polluting Hazelwood power station.
“Decreased energy emissions over this three-month period were entirely caused by lower electricity generation emissions, resulting from the closure of Hazelwood power station,” Dr Saddler said.
Bring on electric power
On the supplier side of the equation, Volvo Penta has set 2021 as deadline to introduce electric power.
With the aim of becoming a driving force in sustainable power systems, Volvo Penta is going full charge into hybrid and all-electric drivelines, offering electrified engines in both its marine and industrial segments by 2021.
Underpinned by the success of hybrid and all-electric technology introduced by the Volvo Group, Volvo Penta’s electrified powerplants will demonstrate the company’s long-term commitment to offering the latest and most appropriate power source for their user applications.
“Volvo Penta is embracing the electric transformation and will be at the forefront in delivering compelling business cases to customers using this new technology,” says Björn Ingemanson, president of Volvo Penta.
“We will take a full systems supplier approach helping our customers in the transition to the new technology. This will happen application-by-application, on the basis that the business case for switching to electric will differ across our many customer segments.
“This is the start of a long-term transition,” he adds. “Diesel and gasoline-powered primary drive systems will remain the most appropriate power source for many applications for years to come.”
Time to start switching over
“Volvo Penta is already several years into its electrification journey,” said chief technology officer Johan Inden.
“We have spent this time building competencies, experience and establishing the technologies required to deliver a sustainable power road map. The advanced engineering projects we are currently running and the performance data received gives us confidence that we are on the right technology path to offer customers a compelling business case for electrification.”
As part of this increased commitment, Volvo Penta has restructured its organisation to accelerate the switch towards electrified power and has committed to an ambitious ramping up of its electrification investment program. An electromobility development-and-test laboratory has also been established at its Swedish headquarters.

Kalmar unveils fully electric medium-range forklift

Kalmar, part of Cargotec, has launched a new range of fully electric forklift trucks in the 9–18 ton range.
According to Kalmar, the electric forklift trucks offer the performance of a powerful diesel truck without the accompanying air emissions, noise and vibration, and with reduced operating costs.
The battery capacity of the forklifts reportedly enables them to operate for a full eight-hour shift, and Kalmar noted that they are future-proofed to operate with new lithium-ion battery technology.
“At Kalmar, we aim for zero emissions in our offering development across the board,” said Peter Ivarsson, Director – Forklift Trucks, Kalmar. “We’re proud to be the first leading manufacturer to offer a full range of electric forklift trucks with this level of lifting capacity. Our electric machines offer savings in terms of faster and simpler maintenance, making them a winning concept in the long run.”

Australian cold-chain industry forms food-waste advocacy group

Australia’s first advocacy group to improve compliance and standards in the handling of food at all levels of the cold chain has been established at a meeting in Queensland.
The inaugural session of the Australian Food Cold Chain Council (AFCCC) on 7 August 2017 brought together representatives from the manufacturing, food transport, refrigeration and cold chain industries.
The Council has reportedly been established in response to mounting community pressure about the costs and environmental damage of food wastage, with the AFCCC positioning itself as an important part of the solution, encouraging innovation, compliance, waste reduction and safety across the Australian food cold chain.
“The new Council is not about promoting an industry – we want to change the industry for the better, said Interim Chair, Mark Mitchell.
“One of our priorities will be to apply whatever pressure is needed in industry and in government to make sure the existing Australian standards for cold chain food handling are properly followed.
“There’s lots of rhetoric in government programs, associations and among food handlers and suppliers about commitments to food waste reduction and cold chain compliance, but little, if nothing, is being done at any level about improving the cold chain, and ensuring that standards are followed. Australia’s track record in efficient cold food handling, from farm to plate, is far from perfect.”
The interim directors of AFCCC are Stephen Elford General Manager Australia New Zealand, Carrier Transicold; Mark Mitchell, Managing Director, SuperCool Australia Pacific; Peter Lawrence, Technical Director ANZ, Thermo King; Kyle Hawker, Transport Manager, Simplot Australia; Adam Wade, National Transport Leader, Lion; Kevin Manfield, General Manager – Products & Markets, MaxiTRANS Australia; plus a nominated individual representing the transport industry.
The AFCCC asserts that on average, Australians waste 860kg of food per person annually, with at least five per cent of Australia’s greenhouse gas emissions coming from food wastage.
Mitchell noted that Australian industry is well placed to attack the issue.
“Performance across the cold-food chain can be improved with better equipment and handling processes as well as with improved monitoring and assessment to determine where the weaknesses lie,” he said.
The new advocacy group’s first priorities will be contributing to both the development of the National Food Waste Strategy and becoming part of the CRC designed to address food waste and fraud.

AusPost launches e-vehicle trial in Brisbane

A three-wheel electric delivery vehicle trial has begun in Brisbane, servicing Coorparoo, Woolloongabba and East Brisbane over an eight-week period. The e-vehicle has three times the parcel carrying capacity of the motorbikes currently used by Australia Post for deliveries – it can hold up to 100 small parcels and 1,200 letters at a time.
Angela Creedon, Queensland State Manager, Australia Post, said Brisbane is a perfect city for the next phase of the electric delivery vehicle rollout with locals increasingly embracing online shopping, and more small parcels being delivered than ever before.
“We know that residents in Brisbane love online shopping. In fact the yearly growth rate in the area is over eight per cent,” Creedon said.
“Our parcels business generates over 70 per cent of our total revenue. Ten years ago parcels contributed less than 25 per cent of our revenue.
“As our business transforms so too are the jobs that our workforce are doing. A few years ago, we equipped our posties so they can deliver small parcels and this latest initiative will allow them to deliver even more – helping to ensure their roles remain meaningful well into the future.
“While letter volumes have nearly halved, this is another example of how Australia Post is looking at ways to keep our posties delivering for Australians.”
The pilot comes after Australia Post announced a $197 million before-tax half-year profit, driven largely by a 5.7 per cent volume growth in the parcels business and postal losses reduced to breakeven.
The e-vehicles are already successfully used in Germany and Switzerland, offering carrying capacity, improved rider safety and lower vehicle emissions.

Linfox invests in Darwin intermodal facility

Linfox has completed the construction of a new intermodal facility in Darwin.
The logistics provider partnered with Vaughan Constructions to design and construct the facility.
Situated next to the Darwin railhead, the 3,000m2 purpose-built site will create up to 15 ongoing local jobs, the company said.
The site features a chilled storage area to ensure temperature-controlled products can be be safely stored during transit.
“Each year, [our] intermodal team shifts more than 15 million pallets for Australia’s retailers using its multi-modal freight network,” said Linfox CEO, Annette Carey.
“Linfox has an extensive footprint in the Northern Territory, with sites in Darwin, Katherine, Tennant Creek and Alice Springs. This new investment increases our capacity and makes it easier for our customers to move inbound and outbound goods throughout the region.”
Carey said the Darwin facility would complement the capabilities of Linfox’s long distance road, rail and coastal shipping distribution services and followed the recent expansion of its Healthcare and Defence logistics capabilities.
The facility will also deliver on Linfox’s environmental commitment with a 100kW battery ready solar system to reduce the site’s carbon emissions. It also features rain water harvesting and high-efficiency LED lighting.

Aurizon calls for competition in Inland Rail development

Aurizon Managing Director and CEO Andrew Harding has reported that he was pleased to see the Government commit in last night’s 2017–18 Budget to investing in freight rail infrastructure, and he believes Governments, at both the federal and state level, have key roles to play in implementing sound policy and regulatory frameworks to support a competitive rail industry.
“To improve the competitiveness of rail freight, the Inland Rail project and linked supply chains will need more than the correct design and construction, they will require major transport policy reform,” Harding said.
“Rail freight companies need to be able to compete on equal footing with other transport modes and allow rail to do more of the heavy-lifting in Australia’s freight transport task.”
Harding said the previously announced decision taken by the Federal and State Governments to introduce heavy-vehicle pricing and investment reform over five years was welcome, however Aurizon wanted to see a strong focus on the detailed implementation of a new pricing methodology and governance to ensure the outcome of reform would be a consistent pricing framework applied across the haulage of both heavy vehicles and rail freight.
“Currently heavy vehicles are charged indirectly by government through diesel excise and registration to recover an historical average of spending on road infrastructure,” said Hardling. “Whereas rail freight operators are directly charged for access to, and use of, rail infrastructure, with prices that are more cost-reflective and overseen by an independent economic regulator.”
“The design will need to allow longer and heavier trains and double stacking of containers on the network and efficiently integrate existing freight supply chains to enable customers to move their freight to, and from, major export ports,” he added.
“The announcement is a big step in the right direction, and should be used as the basis for a major modal shift from road to rail along the east coast, while delivering substantial economic, community and environmental benefits along the way.
“In our grain haulage business, for example, we estimate a fully loaded train carries up to 1,750 tonnes of grain to export, which is the equivalent to 44 trucks on the road. Adopting rail over road for long-distance haulage of freight offers improved safety outcomes for the community by helping to prevent and reduce road fatalities and road trauma. Rail freight also produces an estimated 10 times less carbon dioxide than road freight per tonne-kilometre travelled.”

DHL doubles StreetScooter production

Deutsche Post DHL Group will double the production capacity of its own electric vehicles – the StreetScooter electric van – from 10,000 to as many as 20,000 by the end of 2017.
In addition, the company is now also selling its own electric vehicles – which have so far been optimised for postal operations and delivery purposes – to third parties.
At least half of this year’s annual production is planned for external prospective buyers of the vehicles, the company has shared.
In future, DHL hopes to sell its vehicles to municipal authorities, strategic partners and large fleet customers in Germany and the rest of Europe, aiming to at least double its own StreetScooter fleet from the current 2,500 vehicles this year.
“The large demand for the StreetScooter and our own ambitious climate-protection goals have encouraged us to further expand our commitment in the area of electro-mobility and to also make our expertise available to others,” said Jürgen Gerdes, board member for Post – eCommerce – Parcel, Deutsche Post DHL Group.
“As a result, we are confirming our aspiration to remain the engine of electro-mobility and to become market leader in green logistics.”

DHL Express launches electric vehicle in Australia

DHL Express has put its first fully electric vehicle on Australian roads following a successful trial. The electric vehicle is a Renault Kangoo ZE Van and will be used as the company mail car in Sydney, driving between DHL Express offices.
The Renault Kangoo ZE Van is part of the company’s already operational fleet of hybrid delivery vans. The electric vehicle, dependent upon the driving style and conditions, can be on the road for an average of four hours, an equivalent travelling distance of 100 kilometres on a single charge, eliminating the production of 4.75 tonnes of carbon emissions from the environment over the course of one year. The vehicle runs on a lithium-ion battery and takes six to nine hours to complete a full charge.
“As a global company, we acknowledge the environmental impact of our day-to-day operations and our responsibility to reduce this wherever possible,” said Gary Edstein, CEO/ Senior Vice President at DHL Express Oceania. “Globally, we have seen a 30 per cent improvement in our carbon efficiency since 2008 – and we are aiming to further improve this through new green initiatives like this electric vehicle.”
Overseas, DHL Express has introduced electric vehicles, including electric vans and scooters, on routes in Germany, Japan and Taiwan.
DHL’s parent company, Deutsche Post DHL Group will also proceed with increased production of its own StreetScooter electric vehicle in 2017.
The company announced on March 8 the ambitious target of reducing all logistics-related emissions to zero by 2050. On the road to achieving this, it has also outlined a number of interim goals, including increasing its carbon efficiency by 50 per cent and operating 70 per cent of its own first- and last-mile delivery with clean transport solutions by 2025.
“We looked to our DHL Express colleagues around the world to see the solutions they had developed and were inspired by the success of electric vehicles in these countries,” Edstein said.
“In 2016, we trialled an electric courier van delivering to Sydney’s CBD, and found that a wider rollout of electric vehicles within DHL Express Australia’s courier fleet would require more conveniently located electric charging stations in cities across the country, and vans that can travel longer distances without needing to recharge.”
“Compared to small, densely populated European and Asian cities where electric vehicles are currently operating, Australian cities have unique geographical challenges in terms of distance.”

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