Hays-jobs-employment-skills-in-demand

Logistics hotspots of skills in demand

The second of Hays’ bi-annual Logistics Job Reports for the year 2019 highlights some areas with significant vacancy rates in the transport and logistics area.
This vacancy activity will be focused on multi-skilled candidates across transport, warehousing and supply chain. This is the result of a focus on efficiency improvements and positive productivity, with employers looking for candidates with a strong knowledge of systems and processes and a history of reducing costs, achieving demanding KPI and diverse experience. Employers also want candidates with a wide technical skillset whom they can utilise to their full potential.
Within the transport industry, strained transport networks in Sydney and Melbourne will continue to fuel demand for Transport Allocators. With a busier transport sector in Brisbane, there is a need for Transport Allocators and experienced Transport Supervisors and Managers to lead operations. Employers require candidates with experience in a similar role.
Lateral thinking Transport Coordinators and Managers who cope well under pressure and find the best route at the cheapest rate are also in demand.
Casual HR Drivers as well as MC Drivers with an MSIC card are needed. So are HR and HC Drivers who are open to a multi-skilled role such as driving and labouring.
Freight Forwarders remain in demand but require relevant experience. The Trans-Pacific Partnership has increased vacancy activity in freight forwarding across Australia and subsequently demand for Import/Export professionals, with a focus from employers on sea freight and Mandarin speaking candidates. Those with CargoWise knowledge are also sought.
The heavy vehicle regulations will continue to create demand in the transport sector for qualified Supervisors with a Chain of Responsibility accreditation.
Within warehouse and distribution, Warehouse Managers and Supervisors are required. Candidates must be analytically sound with a proactive approach to KPI. As companies continue to appreciate the benefit of improving logistical efficiencies, candidates who can track, monitor and manage KPI performance are highly sought after. Warehouse
Supervisors willing to manage small teams are also required.
In the warehousing sector, diploma or degree qualified candidates with experience in lean principles are sought.

Distribution of vacancies

In a localised trend, New South Wales’ growing 3PL footprint is leading to demand for Warehouse Managers, Logistics Coordinators, Analysts, Pallet Controllers and Dispatch Coordinators. Employers want to ensure maximum efficiency is achieved and KPI and contracts are being met. Expectations from 3PL employers are growing and they therefore look for candidates who can ensure service delivery levels are met, if not exceeded. They also want to see degree qualified candidates with experience in a similar environment.
Import and Export Coordinators are another area of demand. With many companies moving their manufacturing overseas, candidates with international shipping experience and cargo software knowledge are required.
Dispatch Coordinators are needed, too.
Wharf Fleet Controllers are also sought in response to turnover resulting from the high pressure working environment. Employers look for candidates with wharf experience and a secure, stable and successful career within this space.
In the SME sector, inventory control professionals who can develop procedures to improve inventory accuracy and transparency are required.
Inventory Controllers are another area of demand. The duties of this role were once the responsibility of Warehouse Supervisors, however employers now have strict stock levels tolerance.
Store persons with inventory management software experience are needed too. Companies seek multi-skilled candidates who can manage inventory needs, possess strong computer skills, a forklift license and the ability to load and unload deliveries, pick and pack orders and tidy a store.
Forklift Operators skilled in operating different attachments and High Reach Forklift Operators are sought. While Forklift Operators are available, those with attachment and high reach expertise are rare, as are those who have worked in busy warehouses and have strong navigation skills.
Casual Skilled Labourers are needed for one to two-day assignments. With most people looking for longer-term assignments, reliable candidates for short-term roles are rare.
Another interesting trend is the recovery of the senior level supply chain market. Today, candidates with change management experience, from both a people and process perspective, are in high demand. This is a result of organisations realising the impact that big data, systems and technology can have on improving efficiencies and reducing costs. Individuals who can coach a business through this transition are highly sought after in the current market.
Demand also exists for quality Supply and Demand Planners and S&OP Managers who have worked with complex manual based systems, have exposure to and have assisted with the development of S&OP processes and implementations, possess an analytical and commercial focus and can influence and educate internal stakeholders across an organisation.
Finally, fixed-term contracts and project roles are available. This is a notable change in a market that was previously dominated by permanent roles.

Salary trends

According to our FY 2019/20 Hays Salary Guide, more logistics professionals will receive a pay rise this year than last, but it will be a less significant increase than they hoped for.
We found that 92% of employers will increase their transport and distribution staff salaries in their next review, up from 83% who did so in their last review.
However, the value of these increases will fall. 71% intend to raise salaries at the lower level of 3% or less, up from 63% who did so in their last review. At the other end of the scale, just 3% of employers intend to grant pay increases of more than 6%. The number of employers who will increase salaries at the mid-level, between 3 and 6%, has risen slightly, from 17% to 18%.
There are only a few exceptions. The recovery of the senior supply chain market led to demand for Supply Chain Managers and, in turn, mid-tier Demand and Supply Planners. In some states, salaries have increased in response to this demand.
Tasmania’s positive economic climate led to a surge in interstate and international exports. Looking ahead, salaries are expected to increase in the state for Multi Combination Drivers and Warehouse Supervisors, who remain in short supply.

Hays-jobs-employment-skills-in-demand

Where the jobs are in T&L

Demand for multi-skilled candidates remains high across transport, warehousing and supply chain, according to the latest Hays Jobs Report. This is the result of a focus on efficiency improvements and positive productivity, with employers looking for candidates with a strong knowledge of systems and processes and a history of reducing costs, achieving demanding KPI and diverse experience. Employers also want candidates with a wide technical skill set whom they can utilise to their full potential.
Within the transport industry, strained transport networks in Sydney and Melbourne will continue to fuel demand for Transport Allocators. With a busier transport sector in Brisbane, there is a need for Transport Allocators and experienced Transport Supervisors and Managers to lead operations. Employers require candidates with experience in a similar role.
Lateral-thinking Transport Coordinators and Managers who cope well under pressure and find the best route at the cheapest rate are also in demand.
Casual HR Drivers as well as MC Drivers with a MSIC card are needed. So are HR and HC Drivers who are open to a multi-skilled role such as driving and labouring.
Freight Forwarders remain in demand but require relevant experience. Import/Export professionals are sought, with a particular focus from employers on sea freight and Mandarin speaking candidates. CargoWise experience is a new trend that employers more commonly request.
Within warehouse and distribution, Warehouse Managers and Supervisors are required. Candidates must be analytically sound with a proactive approach to KPI. As companies continue to appreciate the benefit of improving logistical efficiencies, candidates who can track, monitor and manage KPI performance are highly sought after.
In a localised trend, New South Wales’ growing 3PL footprint is leading to demand for Warehouse Managers, Logistics Coordinators and Analysts. Employers want to ensure maximum efficiency is achieved and KPI and contracts are being met. Expectations from 3PL employers are growing and they therefore look for candidates who can ensure service delivery levels are being met, if not exceeded.
Import and Export Coordinators are another area of demand. With many companies moving their manufacturing overseas, candidates with international shipping experience and cargo software knowledge are in high demand.
Dispatch Coordinators are needed, too.
Wharf Fleet Controllers are also sought in response to turnover due to the high pressure work environment. Employers look for candidates with wharf experience and a secure, stable and successful career within this space.
In the SME sector, inventory control professionals who can develop procedures to improve inventory accuracy and transparency are required.
Inventory Controllers are another area of demand. The duties of this role were once the responsibility of Warehouse Supervisors, however, employers now have stricter tolerances on stock levels and are recruiting these professionals in response.
Storepersons with inventory management software experience are needed, too. Companies seek candidates who can multi-skill, manage inventory needs and possess strong computer skills, a forklift licence and the ability to load and unload deliveries, pick and pack orders and tidy a store.
Forklift Operators skilled in operating different attachments and High Reach Forklift Operators are also sought. While Forklift Operators are available, those with attachment and high reach expertise are rare, as are those who have worked in busy warehouses and have strong navigation skills.
Casual Skilled Labourers are needed for one- to two-day assignments. With most people looking for longer-term roles, reliable candidates for short-term roles are rare.
Another interesting trend is the recovery of the senior level supply chain market. Today, multiple Supply Chain Manager vacancies are available in global organisations. This has also led to an increase in the number of mid-tier supply and demand planner vacancies. As a result, demand exists for quality Supply and Demand Planners and S&OP Managers who have worked with complex manual-based systems, have exposure to and assisted with the development of S&OP processes and implementations, possess an analytical and commercial focus and can influence and educate internal stakeholders across an organisation.

Transport employment outlook positive

All sectors – 1Q19.

Hiring intentions in the Transportation & Utilities sector remain robust for 1Q19 despite drifting lower quarter-on-quarter with a Net Employment Outlook of +18%, according to the latest ManpowerGroup Employment Outlook Survey. The survey collects data from over 59,000 employers in 43 countries, including 1,500 in Australia.
The outlook for 1Q19 is -5 points lower than the 7-year high recorded in the last quarter of 2018, but remains in positive territory with its second strongest result since early 2012. The latest data reveals the sector had the strongest year on year gain, up +7 points.
The employment outlook is strongest for the Mining & Construction sector with a Net Employment Outlook of +22%, while the Wholesale & Retail Trade sector has recorded one of the strongest improvements compared to the same period last year as the sector appears to prepare for a post-Christmas hiring boost.

Female ASX 200 appointments surge past 50%

New figures released today by the Australian Institute of Company Directors show that more women than men have been appointed to ASX 200 boards in the first quarter of 2018.
This marks the first time that female appointments to ASX 200 boards have exceeded male appointments since the AICD began tracking monthly appointment rates.
Of the 56 appointments to ASX 200 boards in the first three months of the year, 52% have been women.
This compares to 33% female appointments in the first quarter of 2017 and 44% over the first quarter of 2016.
AICD Chairman Elizabeth Proust AO welcomed the figures but warned against complacency.
“When it comes to increasing gender diversity on Australia’s largest boards, we know that it’s never been a supply problem, it’s been a demand problem,” she said.
“What today’s figures hopefully show is that, finally, we are seeing the demand.
“Research shows that one woman alone does not do enough to achieve the full benefits of diversity and rather that three women, or 30% for most boards, is where the magic happens.
“Importantly, today’s figures aren’t a sign that it’s time to take the foot of the brake. We will only reach our target of 30% female representation across ASX 200 boards by the end of this year if the female appointment rate remains strong.
“Greater gender diversity on our boards is crucial to the future of good governance in this country.”
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Manufacturing fightback: sector quietly adds 40,000 jobs

Polling: attitudes towards manufacturing policy options
A new report outlines the industry’s dogged resilience in difficult times, its importance to the Australian economy, and its more hopeful future prospects.
The report, A Moment of Opportunity, identifies several indicators that suggest that the economic opportunities for domestic manufacturing have improved significantly.
“Australia’s manufacturing industry faces some daunting domestic and global challenges. But it’s not just surviving, it’s finding a way to grow, adding 40,000 new jobs last year,” director of the Centre for Future Work Dr Jim Stanford said.
“That ranks manufacturing as the second biggest source of new jobs in Australia last year.
“Additionally, manufacturing re-invests 5% of its value added in R&D, the highest of any industry, making it an engine room for innovation in the economy.”
New polling released as part of the report shows that Australians are very supportive of pro-active, targeted policy measures to sustain and support manufacturing (see polling results).
“Perhaps influenced by the negative tone of much recent commentary, Australians consistently underestimate the size of manufacturing in Australia’s economy, relative to other industries, but nonetheless recognise the value of maintaining a strong manufacturing sector.
Specifically, there was strong support for targeted policies such as government procurement mandates (81%) and tax incentives tied to investments in domestic facilities (79%); support was strong across all age and voting groups.  Australians opposed measures to attract industry by cutting wages, environmental standards, or across-the-board taxes.  But measures focused on manufacturing, tied to Australian production and jobs, received overwhelming support – by a margin of up to five-to-one.
“Both economically and politically, the smart move would be for legislators to get behind local manufacturing with targeted policies to support Australian jobs, ” Dr Stanford said.

Smart machine technology to go mainstream by 2021

Smart machines, comprising artificial intelligence, intelligent automation, machine learning and deep learning, are to go mainstream by 2021, with 30 per cent adoption by large companies, according to US research firm Gartner, Inc.
“The use of smart machines by enterprises can be transformative and disruption,” said Susan Tan, Research Vice President, Gartner. “Smart machines will profoundly change the way work is done and how value is created. For service providers, smart machines represent opportunities to help enterprises assess, select, implement, change and adapt talent, and for IT and business processes, the opportunity to successfully adopt smart machines for business benefits.”
Gartner predicts spending on smart machine consulting and system integration (C&SI) services to increase from $451 million in 2016 to almost $29 billion by 2021, with the main window for technology adoption occurring between 2020 and 2025. “Enterprises’ investments into smart machines will span more than a decade, implying that the smart machine consulting and system integration (C&SI) service market will be a long-term one,” the company wrote.

Supervisory staff shortage in logistics industry

Australia’s logistics market is very candidate short in several locations. Sydney is one area where good candidates are secured quickly and where new roles are being created at the senior level following redundancies in the first half of the last financial year. 

As a result, employers need to move quickly to secure their preferred candidate.

In fact, outside the mining sector we are seeing a lot of companies expanding or restructuring, which is creating a need to recruit at the supervisor level.

The number of temporary assignments on offer has increased and in many areas is now equal to the number of permanent roles. In general, logistics organisations are recruiting on a temporary basis for roles such as Storeperson, Stock Controller or Inventory Controllers, but want to secure permanent Supervisors and Managers.

We have also seen a big focus from employers on candidates who have used SAP. Increasingly companies say they will not consider candidates if they have not used it.

They also want candidates with like-for-like experience. Today relevant industry experience is viewed more highly than soft skills.

In the mining states the end of several high profile oil & gas, infrastructure and construction projects has impacted flow on industries such as logistics. Employers are therefore cost conscious and are consolidating roles.

When they do recruit they will secure someone in a permanent role rather than a temporary assignment. They are also focusing on cultural fit in order to ensure they recruit the most suitable candidate who is more likely to be retained long term.

In terms of skills in demand for the July to September 2015 quarter, we’re seeing high demand for cost and budget focused Operations Managers. The slowdown of major projects in our resources states has put pressure on logistics organisations to do more with less and work in other lower margin industries such as FMCG. Employers are now looking to hire candidates who can work with reduced budgets while simultaneously maintaining or growing their current scale of operations.

Warehouse Managers are also needed. The number of national and multinational logistics organisations has increased over recent years, which has created more middle management positions. However in many areas there is a lack of candidates with suitable qualifications or key fundamental skills such as literacy with SAP. Consequently companies are now looking to source candidates from interstate but are still not offering relocation assistance.

Good Logistics Coordinators with importing and exporting experience are also in high demand, but there is a shortage of talent in this area.

Inventory and Stock Controllers are needed too since companies want to ensure the stock on hand is accurate.

Supervisors are in high demand but short supply. As noted above, companies are expanding or restructuring and need Supervisors.

We are also seeing a shortage of good Demand/Supply Planners and Logistics Coordinators. Strong available candidates are quickly secured.

Truck Drivers and Storemen/women are another area of demand. Many candidates who previously worked in these roles in logistics are now working in the oil & gas, resources & mining or civil construction industries. Naturally this leaves an extensive number of vacancies within the logistics market, and a shortage of suitably qualified candidates. Storepersons with a forklift licence are also sought.

In terms of candidate trends, people are no longer as transitional as they once were. They are focused on securing a permanent role and are more flexible in their salary expectations. They also want a positive environment where they can remain for the foreseeable future.

In our resources states most candidates have been involved in one of the major projects that have taken place in recent years and therefore the skills and competencies of the talent pool are higher than in previous years.

Job survival in the age of robots and intelligent machines

It is a sobering thought that in ten years, around 65% of the jobs that people will be doing have not even been thought of yet, according to the US Department of Labor.

In Australia, there are reports that up to half a million of existing jobs could be taken over by robotics or machines run by artificial intelligence.

So with smarter computers taking on more of the work that people currently do, we are left to wonder what jobs there might be left for us humans.

Could a robot do your job?

Almost any job that can be described as a “process” could be done by a computer, whether that computer is housed in a robot or embedded somewhere out of sight.

Robots have already taken over many jobs – here 1,100 robots in a new car manufacturing plant in the US.
Flickr/Fiat Chrysler Automobiles Corporate, CC BY-NC-ND

So if intelligent machines can take over many of the jobs of today, what can you do to ensure your job prospects in the future?

Some jobs will always be done by people. The reasons can vary greatly: economic, social, nostalgic or simply not practical for robots to do.

If around 65% of the jobs in 10 years have not been invented yet, we cannot be sure what those future jobs will actually look like, though futurists are not shy of making predictions.

While we may not know what outward form these jobs will take, we can still make a catalogue of the generic skills that will be valued highly.

Thinking skills for future workers

In his book Five Minds for the Future, the Harvard professor Howard Gardner makes the case for cultivating a disciplined mind, being someone who can bring their attention to a laser-like focus and drill down to the essence of a subject, perceiving the simple truth of it.

Then to take this clarity to the next level by combining multiple ideas in new ways to create something interesting and perhaps useful. This done by the synthesising mind and the creative mind.

Gardner describes the respectful mind that values diversity in people and looks for positive ways to interact, thus overcoming the “us and them” instinct that still creates so much conflict in human affairs.

Building on this is the ethical mind, of one who thinks about the big picture and how their personal needs can be brought into alignment with the greater good of the community. Skills for a globally connected world.

Mastering the new media

The future will see a host of new technology for creating and communicating content. In-demand workers will be able to critically assess this content and find ways to communicate it to good effect.

Communication skills have always been important and will remain so.

Knowing how to deal with large data sets will be a handy skill; finding ways to make sense of the data and turn it into useful information.

This could involve devising new, multi-disciplinary and perhaps unconventional approaches to the challenges.

Managing the information

We already filter a deluge of information every day. Our grandparents were lucky, they had to deal with a lot less.

People will need to be even better at managing the cognitive load, they will have the thinking skills to filter the deluge and find optimum solutions to problems.

When good collaboration tools exist for virtual project teams, there are few limits to what can be achieved. More projects will be done by such teams because the technology that supports them is getting better every year.

It allows the right people, with the right skills at the right price to be employed, regardless of where they live.

So it will be that people with the right virtual team skills will be in high demand.

Virtual environments

Speaking of the virtual, Procedural Architects will be at a premium. These are people who can design virtual environments and experiences that allow people to get things done and perhaps have some fun.

This is what the minds behind Google, Youtube, Facebook, Amazon, Wikipedia, Twitter, eBay, LinkedIn, Pinterest, WordPress and MSN have done.

All of this leads us to the question; what actual jobs are likely to be in demand?

We are already developing robots to take on new challenges.
Flickr/Stanford Center for Internet and Society, CC BY-NC-SA

Employment specialists compile lists of what they think will be in demand, based on trends. These are some of the jobs that appear on multiple lists.

The IT sector is likely to need:

information security analysts, big data analysts, artificial intelligence and robotics specialists, applications developers for mobile devices, web developers, database administrators, business intelligence analysts, gamification designers, business/systems analysts and ethicists.

In other disciplines, there will be a need for:

engineers of all kinds, accountants, lawyers, financial advisers, project managers, specialist doctors, nurses, pharmacists, physical therapists, veterinarians, psychologists, health services managers, schoolteachers, market research analysts, sales reps and construction workers (particularly bricklayers and carpenters).

Both lists are not exhaustive.

On the downside, occupations likely to shrink in demand include:

agricultural workers, postal service workers, sewing machine operators, switchboard operators, data entry clerks and word processor typists.

The bottom line

To position yourself favourably for the jobs of the future, become someone who can look at problems in unorthodox ways, seeing different angles and finding workable solutions.

Be a multi-disciplinary, insatiably curious person who knows how to use the tools to model ideas and create prototypes.

Possessed of an open mind and few fixed ideas about how things should be done, you nonetheless have a strong conscience and can operate outside of your comfort zone to achieve win-win outcomes. You are known for your integrity and resilience.

All of these qualities can be cultivated or perhaps rediscovered, since children often exhibit them in abundance. They have always been the way for creative, high-achieving people and they are still the way today and into the future.

In the brave new world of the coming age of intelligent machines, it is these essentially human qualities that will be more important than ever. Some things will never change because human nature is what it is.

The Conversation

This article was originally published on The Conversation.
Read the original article.

Coca-Cola Amatil to shut Bayswater factory, cut 60 jobs

Coca-Cola
Amatil will close its Bayswater bottling plant, cutting 57 jobs and moving
production to a larger plant over the next year.

CCA’s
group managing director Alison Watkins made the announcement yesterday, the ABC and others report, as part of a three-year efficiency and savings drive.

“The closure of Bayswater and relocation of its three
production lines to larger facilities will optimise our manufacturing footprint
and is an integral part of our plan to reduce our cost base and return CCA to
growth,” Watkins said in a statement.

“We have invested more than $500 million in our Australian
supply chain over the past five years and we need to make sure we drive the
best efficiencies we can to get the best returns possible on our significant
investment,”

The Bayswater plant is the smallest of six that CCA operate in
Australia, Fairfax notes. Its three production lines will be shifted to a capital city plant.

The announcement of 57 redundancies follows news of 100 jobs cut
last month.

Tomorrow Watkins is due to detail the results of a strategic
review, which aims to deliver increased productivity and innovation at the country’s
largest non-alcoholic beverage company.

Image: SBS

Xenophon says end of auto scheme will accelerate industry’s collapse

South Australian Senator Nick Xenophon has criticised the federal government’s decision to end the Automotive Transformation Scheme in 2018, saying it will speed up the demise of the sector.

Treasurer Joe Hockey, who delivered his first budget yesterday, said the scheme will end due to the decision by Ford, Holden and Toyota to end car manufacturing. They will all have shut their factories by the end of 2017.

The predicted savings from ending the ATS are $176.7 million in 2018-19, followed by $95.2 million and $28.6 million in the two years following.

Xenophon said there would be a “manifestly inadequate” $400 million remaining in funding from 2015 in the scheme, which has been running since 2011 and assists those involved in the automotive industry to diversify.

"They have simply chopped the scheme off at 2018 without bringing that funding forward to the years in which it could make a real difference to the automotive supply chain,” he told the ABC.

"The consequence of that is that there won't be a chance for the industry to restructure and transition for the 10,000-plus jobs that are involved in the automotive products sector."

Richard Reilly from the Federation of Automotive Products Manufacturers said it would harm research and development in the sector.

The task of transitioning away from automotive for suppliers in the industry is generally seen as a difficult task. Industry expert Professor Goran Roos has predicted that around 20 – 25 per cent of auto suppliers who have not yet diversified will survive.

Image: News Corp

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