Taskforce established for Kwinana port development

The taskforce that will complete the planning for Western Australia’s McGowan Government’s long-term Outer Harbour freight vision has now been established.
The multi-agency Westport Taskforce will outline a long-range vision to guide the planning, development and growth of both the Inner Harbour at Fremantle and the future Outer Harbour at Kwinana.
The Westport Taskforce will deliver the Westport: Ports and Environs Strategy, for which a team of experts from government agencies responsible for planning, transport, environment, jobs and finances will develop answers to key policy questions surrounding the location, size, operating model and timing for a future port.
Meanwhile, planning for the associated road and rail links to support the new port facilities will also form part of the overarching strategy.
Nicole Lockwood is to be appointed as the independent chairperson of the Westport Taskforce. She is a former director of KPMG, current board member of Infrastructure Australia and chairperson of the Freight Logistics Council of Western Australia.
Lockwood was also recently appointed to the expert panel to lead the Inquiry into National Freight and Supply Chain Priorities.
The Taskforce Steering Committee will also comprise director generals of six government departments, with the chairpersons of the Planning Commission and Fremantle Ports.
They will be supported by multi-disciplinary project personnel and supplemented as required by external technical expertise.
The taskforce’s governance arrangements will also incorporate stakeholders including government agencies, port users, local governments, community groups and transport industry unions.
The State Government is committed to retaining the inner harbour as a working port and the taskforce will be expected to ensure that the Outer Harbour is planned in a way that achieves an optimal balance between both facilities.
“This milestone step to establish the Westport Taskforce will lay the foundations for delivering the Outer Harbour,” said Transport, Planning and Lands Minister, Rita Saffioti.
“The Westport Taskforce will focus on providing the necessary infrastructure to support the long-term economic development of the state, maximising future jobs, minimising costs and truck movements, and maximising opportunities for innovation.
“Our pre-election commitment was to give renewed priority to planning for the Outer Harbour and the associated road and rail links as part of a long-term integrated transport plan for the state.
“We’ve allocated an initial $6 million in last week’s Budget so that significant further planning work can start, building on existing technical planning.
“The Outer Harbour has been supported by successive State governments and it is vital we get on with this after the previous government put planning on hold to push for its flawed Perth Freight Link project.”

VISA Global Logistics announces joint venture with Navigators Logistics

Privately owned Australian international logistics company VISA Global Logistics (VGL) has announced a joint venture with Indian logistics company Navigators Logistics over three consecutive launch events in New Delhi, Mumbai and Pune.
The new company is formally called Navigators VISA Global Logistics, or NVGL.
“The partnership was founded on the amalgamation of two like-minded companies that share an unwavering commitment to technology, quality, best practice and a customer-centric approach,” said VGL in a media statement.
VGL and Navigators Logistics’ senior executives attended the events along with the Italian Ambassador to India, His Excellency Lorenzo Angeloni; Italian Consul General, Ugo Ciarlatani; and the Italian Chamber of Commerce Secretary General, Claudio Maffioletti.
“The joint venture combines VGL’s 35 years and Navigators’ 10 years of knowledge and expertise in global logistics and improving supply chains across industries,” VGL added.
Through 15 owned and operated offices, NVGL will handle door-to-door global transport of goods on the Europe – India, India – Asia and India – Australia trade lanes.
“As India progressively integrates into the global economy, the country’s population and buying power will be a driving factor in global trade,” said Vittorio Tarchi, Founder and Director, VGL. “At VGL, we have already seen a significant increase in containers moved in and out of India in the past five years, and this trend is showing no signs of slowing down.”
Simon Hardwidge, Managing Director of VISA Global Logistics, told Prime Creative Media that India offers a good opportunity for growth.
“VISA Global Logistics has been working together with Navigators out of our European offices for four years, and saw the value in making it a formal arrangement,” Hardwidge said.
“We are very excited to announce the joint venture as the Navigator people are enthusiastic, and looking forward to further developing the business together.”

Infrastructure minister commends rail progress

Speaking at the recent Rail Futures Conference held in Melbourne in mid-September by the Rail Freight Alliance, Darren Chester, Minister for Infrastructure and Transport, commended the efforts being made to bolster Australia’s rail capability.
“If we look back at the past 50 years of rail freight here in Victoria, it has been a story of decline – at least, up until recently,” Chester said, adding that as a result of the closure of regional lines and the abolishment of freight gates, goods were increasingly being transported by road rather than rail.
“There is now record investment going into rail freight,” he added, citing government support secured for the $440 million Murray Basin Rail Project, $8.4 billion earmarked for the Inland Rail project, the $58 million Victorian Port Rail Shuttle and the National Freight and Supply Chain Strategy.
“Since becoming Minister, I have been pleased to oversee a $20 billion investment in rail,” he said. “These projects will ease urban congestion, grow the regions and create thousands of new jobs.
“The freight and logistics industry identified rail’s potential to reduce transport costs by about 10 per cent…Our government has secured three Free Trade Agreements, and we are building the infrastructure to capitalise on that.”
Chester added that work is continuing on the Inquiry into National freight and Supply Chain Priorities, designed to inform the National Freight and Supply Chain Strategy.
“The inquiry will set our understanding of what challenges and opportunities lie ahead, and how we can take advantage of them,” he said.
“It is these investments that are going to set up our nation for the next 100 years. I am proud to be playing a part in delivering these game-changing projects, in partnership with the community.
“These are the projects our kids and our grandkids will thank us for – in the cities and in the regions.”

CouriersPlease opens two new depots

Parcel delivery service CouriersPlease has opened two new relocated logistics facilities in major Australian cities, investment in its infrastructure ahead of a forecast growth in parcel deliveries in tandem with the growth in e-commerce.
The two new Perth and Melbourne locations will be key logistics facilities as the company expands its reach in Australia and overseas, as CouriersPlease explained in a media statement.
Located in the new $440 million logistics hub Drystone Industrial Estate, CouriersPlease’s relocated state-of-the-art logistics facility in Truganina, Victoria, replaces the company’s Port Melbourne, Victoria, depot. Along with CouriersPlease’s existing Mulgrave facility, it will provide the business with east-to-west coverage of Melbourne. The site is 29,000m2 in total, with 12,500m2 under the roof, and will accommodate over 160 courier vehicles. Additional bay spaces have also been allocated to accommodate future growth.
Drystone Industrial Estate is home to other distribution centres for major Australian companies, including Kmart, The Reject Shop and Rand.
The second recently opened logistics facility is located in Welshpool, an inner south-eastern suburb of Perth. The new 4,043m2 site will be the delivery hub for Perth and Western Australia. It comprises a 3,443m2 warehouse, with a 600m2 office space, and room to expand a further 2,000m2 in the future.
The logistics facility will provide improves access to the CBD and the north and south of the city and is close to main arterial routes such as Orrong Road, Welshpool Road, Leach Highway and Tonkin Highway.
In September last year, CouriersPlease opened a relocated Brisbane depot in Salisbury, and a new Adelaide depot is set to open in Marleston later this year.
“CouriersPlease has relocated our logistics facilities in major capital cities in order to accommodate the significant growth in the volume of parcels moving throughout our network,” Mark McGinley, CEO, CouriersPlease. “Our commitment in moving to the west of Melbourne has stemmed from it being a massive growth corridor with some of the highest rates of online shopping in the country. Our new Welshpool depot gives us greater coverage of the city and a larger warehouse space for logistics operations, allowing us to bring a better service to our customers. With room for future expansion, we hope to bring more jobs and opportunities to the local community.”

E-commerce driving supply-chain complexity

E-commerce is forcing supply chains to get smart to cope with rising demand, logistics industry veteran Ingilby Dickson told Logistics & Materials Handling.
“Online offers can’t work without slick and smart supply chains,” he said. “As such, planning has stepped up to be critical in delivering customer-driven outcomes.”
He added that cost-to-serve understanding and technology – whereby business costs are used to calculate the cost of servicing a customer – are not just enablers, but core engine room–driven processes.
“These are in strong demand for the new omnichannel and/or direct online offers, to make commercial sense and create strong customer loyalty,” he said.
Dickson’s industry expertise has been gained over a career working for various major corporations including BlueScope Steel, Goodman Fielder and TNT. He now stands on the Boards of various large organisations in Australia.

Ingilby Dickson.
Ingilby Dickson.

He tells Logistics & Materials Handling that his first exposure to logistics processes happened far from a warehouse. “It all started in the military, with a focus on planning-driven processes to get equipment, food and weapons to the front line” he said. “It was far more than transport, it was true end-to-end accountability.”
Over his career, Dickson has seen the term ‘logistics’ expand to encompass supply chain functions such as inventory, cost, service, and also the horizontal accountability across organisations between sales, and manufacturing and distribution. “It’s now a focus on constraint-based optimisation for the net benefit of the whole organisation,” he said. “The result is that ‘supply chain and logistics’ is now recognised as an important and necessary function in all modern business practices.”
As the logistics task has become more sophisticated, so too have the skills required to lead the business function, said Dickson. “The required leadership qualities have changed considerably,” he added. “Senior supply chain managers now need skills to coordinate and plan across a business and be able to manage internal conflict to ensure customers and shareholders win.
“As such, smart and astute leaders with strong commercial skills are needed – leaders of supply chains need to have courage to challenge across a business and lead the best whole-of-business outcomes.”
Dickson is passionate about sharing his expertise at industry knowledge sharing sessions, such as the Supply Chain Leader Insights events, held this year in Melbourne (17 October) and Sydney (19 October).
“Events like Supply Chain Leader Insights are crucial as we need our leaders to share and help others in traditionally thinking organisations see the light in order to drive supply-chain improvements,” he said.
Find out more about the Supply Chain Leader Insights events, book tickets ($57 using the promo code ‘LMH’) and see videos from last year’s event at the Supply Chain Logistics Insight website.
 

Shortage of large-scale logistics facilities in Melbourne

The industrial leasing market in Melbourne’s north has seen strong tenant demand continue to absorb supply of prime-grade stock, according to real estate group Colliers International, particularly in the food and beverage, logistics and specialised manufacturing industries.
“As leasing space and supply continues to tighten across the northern suburbs, we are also starting to experience a reduction in let-up time and incentives, with one of the key drivers being a shrinking serviced land allotment pipeline,” said Colliers International’s Marco Sandrin.
“With respect to current leasing vacancy for more than 10,000m2, we are currently experiencing the tightest market there has been for many years, with only eight buildings available, totalling just more than 100,000m2.”
Sandrin said two of the most significant transactions that had occurred this year were within the Melbourne Airport precinct.
“Growthpoint has leased 120 Link Road, a 26,517m2 facility to Wesfarmers’ Workwear Group, and 45-55 South Centre Road, a 14,082m2 facility to Direct Couriers, both on 10-year leases,” he said.
In Melbourne’s western suburbs, 50 per cent of leasing deals for more than 3,000m2 have taken place in the inner west, with the main catalyst being easy access to the CBD, Colliers International’s Stephen Ryan explained.
“We are also seeing a high demand for low site coverage cross-dock facilities that is resulting in higher square-metre rates across the buildings, along with quicker let-up times,” he said.
“With shrinking land supply and recent leasing take-up, we are expecting let-up times to continue to reduce and the incentives to compress.”
Ryan profiled a deal negotiated for delivery service BagTrans as an example. The company has signed a lease for 8,333m2 at GM Property Group’s business park at 600 Geelong Road, Brooklyn, from the start of October, following less than three months’ vacancy.
Colliers International recently released a custom publication showcasing large industrial facilities suited to transport and logistics, warehousing or distribution users across Melbourne, Big Sheds Victoria 2017.

ASCI appoints new member to Ethics Committee

The Australasian Supply Chain Institute (ASCI) has appointed Mike Owen to the ASCI Initiative’s Ethics Committee
ASCI, formerly apicsAU, is a non-profit, professional membership community established in 1963 that supports the Australasian professional supply chain community, through its ethics, risk and technical committees.
Mike has nearly 35 years of involvement in senior inventory, procurement, logistics and supply chain, sales, marketing and executive management roles, and was contracted to Chainalytics Australia as a Supply Chain Engagement Specialist and is currently working with ChangeLogic as a Senior Client Engagement Consultant.
The role of ASCI’s Ethics Committee is to oversee the ASCI Code of Ethics; create and oversee the applicable Confidential Ethics Complaint Reporting Procedures, and ethics advisory structures; review requests for advisory opinions; and review ethics complaints and make recommendations to the Board.
Dr Pieter Nagel, CEO, ASCI, said, “Mike has been part of the ASCI community from early on. I would like to formally welcome Mike to the Ethics Committee on behalf of ASCI. I am looking forward to his professional contribution to our Ethics Committee as we pave the way for professionalising supply chain management in this country.”

Manhattan Associates wins logistics innovation award

Manhattan Associates’ Warehouse Management Solution (WMS) has won the Logistical Innovation award at the 2017 Australian Business Awards.
“This recognition reflects both our 27 years of focus and investment in supply-chain and omni-channel commerce innovation and how our solutions are enabling Australian organisations to respond to their customers’ rapidly changing needs,” said Raghav Sibal, Managing Director – Australia and New Zealand, Manhattan Associates.
“The expectations of today’s consumers are soaring and they want their goods delivered faster and more conveniently. With our WMS and complementary solutions, such as Distributed Order Management, retailers, manufacturing brands, wholesalers and distributors are equipping themselves with flexible fulfilment capabilities. By enabling them to work their whole network harder – leveraging inventory in transit, within stores, at suppliers, as well as in distribution centres – they can fulfil orders quicker and more profitably.”
Manhattan Associations supports Country Road Group, Casella Family Brands, eStore Logistics and Jeanswest, among others.
“Today, companies are facing a highly competitive and continuously changing business landscape,” said Tara Johnston, Program Director, Australian Business Awards. “In this context, the performance of companies depends more than ever on their flexibility, adaptability and responsiveness.
“New technological possibilities have the potential to transform the way companies operate within their respective industries with long-term gains in efficiency, productivity and customer loyalty. Each year, the ABA100 Winners are recognised for their commitment to business and product innovation and for their achievements in transforming business practices and end user experiences.”
The Australian Business Award for Logistical Innovation recognises products and services that provide innovative solutions for new and existing market needs in the fields of logistics and supply chain management.
 

NSW freight minister welcomes CoR changes

NSW minister for roads, maritime and freight Melinda Pavey has thrown her support behind proposed interstate changes to the National Heavy Vehicle Regulator’s (NHVR) Chain of Responsibility (CoR).
The Australian Logistics Council (ALC) and the Australian Trucking Association (ATA) have submitted joint notices of intention to the regulator to develop an industry-wide ‘Master Code’ that is hoped to enhance heavy-vehicle safety.
Introduced at the 2017 ALC Compliance Summit in Sydney, the new code of conduct is hoped to extend the legal obligations for safe road transit of executive officers and company directors right across the supply chain.
Speaking at the summit on Tuesday, Pavey described the number of deaths on state roads annually as “unacceptable,” insisting that zero should be the only acceptable target.
“I strongly support the introduction of a fair regime for the Chain of Responsibility as I believe it delivers on road safety,” Pavey said. “We have advocated a common start date of 1 July 2018 for various Chain of Responsibility reforms for various industry and regulator education.
“We know there is a lot to do and one of the things is the issue of improving and enhancing the quality of heavy vehicles, encouraging that investment.
“One of the ways that we need to do that is to have good conversations with local councils around Sydney and explain to them that a higher-capacity heavy vehicle can also be a safer heavy vehicle.”
Freight is a $60 billion industry in Australia and employs close to 500,000 people, directly or indirectly.
Industry forecasts anticipate freight volumes will almost double to 794 million tonnes by 2031 and is said to be one of the major factors when considering safety.
A Master Code will effectively hold all parties of the supply chain accountable for breaches of road transport, mass dimension loading, speed compliance and work-hour laws.
“Freight is important to the state and I am constantly reminding people that I am not only the roads minister but also minister for roads, maritime and freight, and they are all of equal importance,” Pavey continued.
“I am honoured to be minister at a time when our government in New South Wales is investing in historic levels of freight infrastructure to ensure the transit and transfer of goods on our network is smooth and, above all, safe.
“And that is not without its challenges, at this time. We have seen an increase in heavy-vehicle incidents and fatalities over recent months and it is important that we look at those statistics.”
The minister said that road users are five times more likely to die in a crash in regional New South Wales than in metropolitan areas, with 10 fatalities for every 100,000 people.
In the city, an average of two people for every 100,000 people die on the roads. The divide, Pavey says, is similar to statistics recorded in the US.
“I am often told that this is not an achievable task and will never happen but we must work towards zero,” the minister said. “The New South Wales road toll isn’t only a number – it is people and is closer to home than you may think.
“It is a number that is unacceptable however small it is until that number gets to zero. How many fatalities would you, as operators, be willing to accept in your company each year?
“Under the Chain of Responsibility, complying with transport law is a shared responsibility where all parties in the road transport supply chain are responsible for preventing breaches.
“We should be working together to push the number of deaths on New South Wales roads towards zero and I will, however, recognise the work of industry to achieve this.”

ALC safety summit insight to shape future strategy

The Australian Logistics Council (ALC) identified a number of priority areas at the its Supply Chain Safety & Compliance Summit that will form the basis of its efforts to improve supply chain safety over the year ahead.
The event was held in Sydney this week, and featured an address by the Hon. Melinda Pavey MP, NSW Minister for Roads, Maritime and Freight, as well as a keynote presentation by Sarah Bell, UK Traffic Commissioner for London and the South East of England, focusing on the central role of UK Traffic Commissioners in managing risks to road safety.
“The Summit, which was attended by more than 280 people from across the supply chain, reinforced ALC’s position as Australia’s leading industry advocate for supply chain safety and compliance,” said Michael Kilgariff, Managing Director, ALC.
“As the Summit’s opening video noted, Chain of Responsibility (CoR) is all about safety. These two days were an invaluable opportunity for industry representatives to recommit to continuous improvement, learn more about effective safety practices, and consider how to apply these techniques in their own day-to-day operations.”
A core focus of the Summit was the upcoming changes to Chain of Responsibility obligations under the Heavy Vehicle National Law (HVNL), and the development of a Registered Industry Code of Practice (Master Code) to assist CoR compliance.
“Through a series of consultative workshops, attendees also had the opportunity to directly shape the content of the Master Code for heavy-vehicle safety, currently being developed by ALC in partnership with the Australian Trucking Association (ATA),” added Kilgariff.
As a result of the discussions that occurred at the Summit, the ALC has identified a number of key themes, and the actions flowing from these will form the basis of ALC’s safety-related work program over the coming year. These are:
1. The Master Code is a significant step – but it can’t solve all the problems. 
The ALC will work to ensure it is comprehensive resource for industry – but organisations will still need to consider their own operational circumstances when thinking about CoR compliance.
2. Continuous improvement in safety is a core aspect of freight’s social licence. 
The ALC will work with industry and governments to highlight the improved technology and safety features of modern heavy vehicles to contribute to improved safety for all road users, including passenger vehicles.
3. Safety is a shared responsibility. 
The ALC will continue working to highlight this within the industry and in other sectors, especially given the increased CoR obligations of directors/executive officers from mid-2018. Driving continuous improvement in compliance is both good community practice and good business practice.
4. There is scope to make greater use of telematics and technology in safety.
The ALC will continue to advocate for the compulsory use of telematics to improve safety, as well as the removal of legislative and regulatory barriers that prevent the uptake of technology that improves safety and productivity.
5. CoR compliance will increasingly factor into procurement and contract arrangements. 
Both governments and listed companies are writing CoR compliance requirements into contractual arrangements, and won’t deal with businesses that can’t demonstrate compliance. Through the delivery of the Master Code, ALC will assist businesses to develop procedures they need to not only ensure compliance, but also demonstrate it.
6. Training is vital. 
Businesses need to make certain their employees (and subcontractors) understand their CoR obligations. The ALC will emphasise the importance of building CoR compliance components into training employee training modules – for both new and existing employees.
7. Relatively low cost of entry to industry poses safety risks. 
Often new entrants to the sector are failing to invest adequately in vehicle safety and CoR compliance. The ALC will continue our advocacy on operator licensing/compliance and work with regulators to encourage a particular focus on compliance in this area of the market, especially given anticipated growth in e-commerce and peer-to-peer freight delivery models.
8. Executives need to understand CoR compliance and effectiveness of their organisation’s systems. 
Board reporting on CoR is not just a good way of ensuring obligations are being complied with – but is also a good way of keeping safety issues a priority for businesses. The ALC will continue to work with industry to develop metrics for CoR board reporting that makes the information provided to executives meaningful, and capable of driving safety and business improvement.
9. Heavy vehicles are still overrepresented in accident and fatality statistics – even though heavy vehicle drivers are not always the party at fault. 
Trend lines have started to run the wrong way – and this is not a time for complacency. The ALC will engage with law-enforcement and regulatory agencies to help determine what factors are driving this (including illicit drug use), and assist with the development and delivery of strategies to combat them.
10. Messages about load restraint/overloading are still not penetrating the whole of the industry. 
The ALC will continue to support regulators’ efforts to promote this critical safety issue, particularly among smaller and independent operators.

©2019 All Rights Reserved. MHD Magazine is a registered trademark of Prime Creative Media.