Asendia selects Tigers for B2C fulfilment in Australia

Tigers has been selected as the local logistics partner to support the launch of Asendia Oceania and provide a regional footprint for B2C and omnichannel fulfilment solutions in Australia.
Hong Kong-based Tigers has an extensive warehousing network across Australia in Perth, Adelaide, Melbourne, and Sydney, with a focus on B2C vertical markets. Read more

Kuehne + Nagel to acquire the Quick Group

The Quick Group has entered into an agreement to be acquired by Kuehne + Nagel, a global logistics company operating in airfreight, seafreight, contract logistics, and overland businesses.
Quick will continue to offer tailor-made solutions to all the industries they serve and will operate as independent specialised product brands: Sterling Aviation, QuickSTAT, Quick Healthcare, and Quick Logistics. The Quick/Sterling team, including management, will continue to support their client base. Unitrans International Logistics will not be part of this transaction.
The partnership will offer Quick’s customers additional service and resource capabilities, with an expanded global footprint within Kuehne + Nagel’s operating network across more than 100 countries.
“We are very excited to become part of the Kuehne + Nagel Group and further expand the services we provide to our customers, with a clear focus on providing integrated logistics solutions with speed, control, communication, and IT efficiencies. We plan to continue leading the industry, providing the very best specialized solutions,” Dominique Bischoff-Brown, CEO, The Quick Group of Companies said.
The closing of the transaction is subject to the satisfaction of customary conditions.
Read more:

SEKO Logistics partners with ShipStation

SEKO Logistics is partnering with ShipStation to increase its eCommerce merchants’ ability to grow in new cross-border markets.
ShipStation helps eCommerce retailers import, organise, process and ship their orders quickly and easily from any web browser.
“We’re excited by the opportunity to partner with ShipStation and to be combining our respective strengths to open up new markets for dynamic and ambitious merchants, especially those exporting from our major markets in the United Kingdom, United States and Australia. SEKO’s reputation for cross-border eCommerce solutions means we are also a first port of call for smaller shippers that want to expand globally. We will now be able to migrate those companies to ShipStation and they can just ‘flip a switch’ to use our cross-border eCommerce solutions because ShipStation is integrated with so many eCommerce platforms,” Brian Bourke, SEKO Logistics’ VP of Marketing, said.
Merchants can now connect to SEKO Logistics via ShipStation and see:

  • Reduced transit time and lower cost to international markets for faster expansion
  • Reduced cart abandonment rates internationally with lower shipping costs
  • An easy and monetized returns solution with international in-country return capabilities
  • Unified tracking internationally regardless of final mile postal carrier
  • Retailer/Seller custom-branded tracking portals

Omni-channel DC – from MHD magazine

Photo: Kathmandu’s general manager supply chain Caleb Nicolson and national distribution manager Shawn Silk.

Travel and adventure brand Kathmandu has established one of Australia’s first purpose-designed omni-channel DC in Melbourne.
 The world of Kathmandu
Kathmandu’s Truganina DC is responsible for distribution across its Australian retail network and to online customers globally.
“While the majority of our online business is currently in Australia and New Zealand, last year we launched a global website, so we are now responding to more demand,” said Kathmandu’s general manager supply chain Caleb Nicolson.
The Truganina DC is 25,000 square metres. It’s built for growth, and made it possible for Kathmandu to consolidate its previous operations.
 A bigger, smarter DC
The Kathmandu Supply Chain team started the journey about five years ago. “We knew we had to change, we knew we needed a larger site, the key question was what was the most appropriate design and automation,” said Mr Nicolson.
Kathmandu evaluated a range of order fulfilment options including zone-routed picking and goods-to-person (GTP), and it took six to 12 months before the business got to the point where it was clear that a batch-pick sortation solution would be the best fit.
“There were a lot of drivers for change,” said Mr Nicolson.
“The first one was that the lease on our building was ending, and we had run out of space and couldn’t meet our operational output per day.”
Kathmandu was seeking an operation that enabled high fulfilment responsiveness, which was critical, given the success of its strong promotional model.
With its previous discrete order picking strategy, Kathmandu’s staff would walk the DC 116 times to service its 116 stores. With the new batch-pick sortation system, they only need to walk the DC two to three times a day.
“With turnover increasing at double-digit rates for the last seven years, online has been a huge growth area for us.
“Our goal with the new DC is to be able to dispatch every order as it’s received on the day or, if not, the following day,” said Mr Nicolson.
Kathmandu has made a significant investment in systems in recent years, with its network built around responsiveness.
When a customer buys an item in a Kathmandu store, it is in demand in the DC the very next day, with all out-of-stocks prioritised for picking.
“With our new batch-pick sortation system, the pick accuracy is far beyond what we could achieve with our previous manual processes,” said Mr Nicolson.
“The trick for us has been to determine the timing of batch releases, aiming anything that’s been ordered in the morning to be dispatched that afternoon.”
Prior to implementing the system, Kathmandu contacted suppliers and changed packaging and barcodes etc. to maximise the volume of product and the width of its range that could be handled by the system, with items that transfer via the sortation system being the most cost-effective path to its customers.
The sortation system also provides a flexible conveying solution, with large items capable of being handled across two cells.
Seasonality and peak periods
With its promotional model, Kathmandu experiences the majority of demand during sale events, which are effectively at the middle to end of a season. This means Kathmandu’s range launch or initial push quantities are potentially lower than for a traditional retailer.
A traditional retailer may push 50-60% of their volume at the start of a new season, before switching to a replenishment model.
“Kathmandu’s seasons are quite different,” said Mr Nicolson, “We have three seasons and our range launch volumes are less than half the industry standard due to our promotional model and the majority of demand occurring during key promotional periods.
“We saw the need for a logistics system that could be very responsive, as we needed to maintain high service levels for highly variable demand in stores.
“For us, the ability to have a system that had the flexibility to scale up output on a Monday without a linear relationship to labour is really key.
“Under our previous manual pick method, if we wanted to increase output by 50%, it was basically 50% more people in the building. That all changes with a sortation system, particularly when you’ve got the batch-pick opportunity.”
Kathmandu’s DC was designed to accommodate growth. The capacity of the sortation system can be scaled up by adding more store or online chutes, which gives Kathmandu flexibility based on where its business grows.
The company currently inducts goods into the sortation system from one end only, and it is possible to significantly increase throughput by inducting from both ends. It can also put a mezzanine floor above the pick module, and extend the building at a later stage.
“We also ran a really high pool of agency staff, particularly in the last year within our old distribution centres, so we knew – and the narrative to our team was – as we transition people across, our existing and core Kathmandu people would have a role, because we’d be able to remove the agency element from the business,” said Mr Nicolson.
Automated split-case sortation
Dematic has implemented many cross-belt sorting systems for full case sortation in Australia.
“What was really new about the Kathmandu facility is that we’re using the crossbelt sorter to do split-case sortation to individual stores,” said Dematic’s solutions manager Darren Rawlinson.
“We take a batch of the store orders, together with some e-commerce orders, and group the demand.
“The pickers then pick those items and feed them into the sorter, which automatically allocates the picked items to the relevant stores,” he said.
Full cases can also be picked in the system. These are picked in the same manner and loaded onto the conveyor system, or, if they’re required to be broken and fed to individual stores, they feed up onto a mezzanine area ready for induction into the crossbelt sorting system.
The system can sort up to 254 store destinations together with the e-commerce areas and packing areas.
Because the crossbelt sorter does not rely on gravity and gives a positive sortation action, the system can handle a very wide range of products from a small compass packed in a plastic wrapper, all the way through to a large sleeping bag.
When Kathmandu is picking a batch of orders for stores, it also considers family groups, with the system allocating each store and family group combination to a chute. When an item is scanned on the sorter, the control system looks up to see which stores require that product, and then sorts it into the chute that has been allocated for that store and that family group.
Going to a batch-pick concept means labour can be kept relatively static, even though Kathmandu is dealing with some very different throughput days.
Picking e-commerce orders for free
One of the challenges Kathmandu faced is that e-commerce is a rapidly growing part of the business.
“What we saw with batch picking was a unique opportunity to pick e-commerce orders essentially for free,” said Mr Rawlinson. “The way we achieve that is by grouping those orders in with the store orders, so that if any store needs a product that’s been ordered online, the operator is simply told pick two instead of one.”
The items are sorted to a Dematic RapidPut wall, where an operator carries out a final sortation for the e-commerce orders and assembles those ready for packing.
At the put wall, an operator is faced with a chute where all the items for e-commerce orders have been consolidated.
The operator scans an individual item, and the system looks to see if the order has already been allocated a cubby in the put wall.
If it hasn’t, it allocates the cubby closest to the operator. After the item has been allocated to a cubby in the put wall, a put-to-light (PTL) display comes on at the front of the wall, directing the operator to the position in which they need to put the item. They then press a button to confirm the put operation.
The system automatically selects a small cubby for small orders and a large cubby for larger orders.
Each of the put walls has 144 locations, meaning that one put wall can deal with 144 e-commerce orders at any one time. On the rear of the put wall, lights indicate the next order to be packed.
With the configuration of the system, an order can be picked, processed, packed and fed to dispatch shortly after that order is made available for picking.
For more information visit www.dematic.com/en-au/.

Toll designs ‘next-gen’ DC around e-commerce

The Hon. Melinda Pavey, Minister for Roads, Maritime and Freight, New South Wales, has attended the official opening for Toll Group’s new distribution centre in Western Sydney, a facility the Australian logistics company claims is specially designed to support online retailing.
Pavey performed the ribbon cutting, alongside John Mullen, Chairman of Toll Group, and Alex Linton, General Manger – Logistics of Specialty Fashion Group, the new DC’s inaugural anchor tenant.
The $160 million “retail and e-commerce centre” is set across 32,000sqm, and incorporates 15,600sqm of automation equipment.
According to Toll, the facility is capable of picking, processing and packing 375,000 items per day, shortening delivery times “from days to hours.”
“Staying competitive in a rapidly changing global market requires vision, determination and an appetite for change, and that’s what Toll’s new facility will provide,” said Pavey.
Chris Pearce, Divisional Director – Toll Global Logistics, noted that today’s market is placing aggressive demands on retailers to provide fast fulfilment and delivery, while keeping costs down.
“Toll’s investment in the new facility is helping our customers adapt to the new retail environment,” he said. “The facility is equipped with $50 million in advanced automation technology so retails can deliver their e-commerce orders faster and in a much more economical way.
“This advanced technology will increase our productivity fivefold – capable of picking, processing and packing 70 million items per year.”
Specialty Fashion Group worked with Toll in the design of the facility, with scalability and future growth in mind.
“At Specialty Fashion Group, we’re constantly looking to improve the omni-channel experience for our customers,” said General Manager – Logistics, Linton. “We have a highly specialised supply chain, so we needed a customised solution that would meet our ongoing needs as a retailer.”
Automation of the facility will reportedly reduce manual handling by 70 per cent, expected to lead to a reduction in safety incidents.

Outdoor group accelerates omnichannel expansion

Fenix Outdoor Group, a subsidiary of Switzerland-based outdoor goods specialist Fenix Outdoor International AG, has boosted its international, omnichannel growth strategy. Fenix Outdoor Group will standardise its order fulfilment on the Manhattan SCALE system with initial deployments in its distributions centres in the US and Germany, followed by the Netherlands, Norway, China and Australia.
Fenix Outdoor Group develops and markets high-quality, low-weight equipment and clothing for outdoor activities under its Fjällräven, Tierra, Primus, Hanwag and Brunton brands, and sells through a combination of its own stores, retail partner stores and a growing online operation. The company’s major markets include North America, Germany and the Nordics as well as Australia.
Established in the 1950s, Fenix Outdoor has grown organically and through a series of acquisitions. Its 2015 purchase of Globetrotter, a German retail group, transformed the company from a predominantly wholesale-oriented business to a multi-channel commerce operator. The multiple, disparate systems it had inherited over the years were, however, hindering its further development. Fenix Outdoor therefore opted for a new warehouse and distribution management system to optimise its expanded business operation and to support its broader international and omnichannel growth ambitions.
Global supply chain director at Fenix Outdoor Group Marcel Gerrits commented: “With today’s consumers requiring exceptional shopping service, we are building our capabilities to provide a ‘best in class’ omnichannel one – offering our customers the goods they want, whenever and wherever they want them. We selected Manhattan as our chosen partner and its SCALE system that allows us to serve multiple channels from a single inventory pool. It also has on-the-ground support teams in all the geographies where we will deploy.”
 

Survey finds delivery offering crucial for purchasing decisions

A recent survey has confirmed that parcel delivery has a major impact on consumer decisions.
The survey, conducted by IT firm Localz, questioned consumers across Australia, the UK and the US on last-mile delivery.
The survey found that 94 per cent of customers would choose a different shop or brand based on different delivery options.
Survey respondents shared that their biggest delivery bugbears were long delivery windows and ‘we missed you’ cards.
Almost four in five respondents noted that they considered an acceptable delivery ‘window’ to be two hours or under. Receiving an accurate ‘estimated time of delivery’ was shown to be a big deal, rated ‘very important’ by 47 per cent of customers, and ‘important’ by another 36 per cent – only one per cent of respondents said an accurate delivery time estimation was ‘not important’.
“If Aussie business intends to compete with the impending introduction of Amazon, and more competition generally, they need to think hard about their delivery transport,” commented Walter Scremin, General Manager, Ontime Delivery Solutions.
“You might have a great product line but if you can’t get it to customers in a timely, professional fashion they will try your competitors.”
He added that too many Australian businesses rely on courier companies for delivery. “Couriers can play a useful role for small, ad-hoc delivery orders,” he said. “But if your business is managing large numbers of regular orders, or needs to ship large, unusual or fragile parcels, you would be crazy to trust that to a courier company.
“Couriers are not set up to focus on a unique business, making it incredibly difficult to achieve consistent, high-performing deliveries.”

Linfox evolves with e-commerce

Transport giant Linfox has embraced the global e-commerce boom by adding a new array of fulfilment services to its portfolio that range from storage all the way through to product repairs.
Known for taking a proactive approach on new technology and shifts in market demand, Linfox has embraced the global e-commerce boom by adding a comprehensive range of fulfilment services to its portfolio.
“The market is moving towards online retailing and omni-channel systems, which is something traditional supply chains can’t necessarily support in a cost-effective way,” John Pucek, General Manager – Operations Development at Linfox, told Logistics & Material Handling.
“That’s why transport businesses like Linfox are evolving into much more multi-faceted organisations. Our new fulfilment operation in Sydney is the latest example of that evolution.”
The Sydney facility is designed to provide comprehensive fulfilment services for e-commerce operations – ranging from basic storage, ‘pick and pack’ and dispatch services through to product customisation, kitting, reverse logistics, repairs and even order track and trace services.
“We’re also developing our own, enterprise-grade e-commerce solution for the consumer goods market,” he said.
“A company will be able to purchase a fully managed service where we provide the e-commerce platform, a management team and online store management. We even do all the content management, and it will be integrated into our fulfilment.”
The service is designed for small- to medium-sized businesses trading between $120–300 million. “Rather than having to invest in their own e-commerce platform, they can get the complete package from us,” he explained – adding that the company launched the fulfilment and e-commerce projects at a strategy level in January 2016.
“We secured our first customer, consumer electronics company Belkin, in November 2016, and then went live in April this year,” he said.
Initially, Linfox will continue to focus on the consumer electronics market, he added, and it was recently announced that the company’s second confirmed customer is audio company Sennheiser. Next up are health and beauty. “The service offering suits many industries, but they’re the two current strategic targets,” he shared.
“We want to be a real partner of consumer goods organisations and retailers,” Pucek added – highlighting the evolutionary leap Linfox has taken from its beginnings as a transport operation.
“We’re hoping to be more so a partner than a 3PL – we want to be more integrated with them to help them grow their businesses, and now we’re looking at the other channels for which they want to grow their business and how we can support them by investing in the technologies for them.”
Pucek said that as consumers and small businesses demand better choice in how and where they receive their products, the market will continue to see change and innovation when it comes to last mile delivery.
“The challenge for traditional operators will be to bend and flex with consumer demand,” said Pucek.
“Linfox is investing heavily in our systems to provide small businesses and end consumers with greater visibility throughout the fulfilment supply chain.”

Supply chain event to inform omni-channel strategies

In an increasingly connected and transparent world where global economic integration and disruptive technology places tremendous stress on supply chains, it is critical for ANZ organisations to develop a smarter and more agile supply chain strategy.
With supply chains constantly evolving to meet the ever-changing expectations of ever-more sophisticated and demanding customers omni-channel customers, it is challenging to balance efficiency, performance and cost while investing in the right technology and tools required to succeed.
The Supply Chain Planning & Innovation Summit 2017 will tackle these challenges by combining best practices, and thought leadership case studies with interactive discussions for problem solving, idea exchanges and debate on the hottest topics in end-to-end supply chain planning and technology innovation.
An exciting selection of over 30 speakers has been confirmed, sharing insight from companies such as Coca-Cola Amantil, GSK, Kimberley-Clark, the Australian Logistics Council, Clarins, kikki.k and Dulux Group.
Click here to download the full programme.
The three-day event will focus on developing transformational strategies to improve demand and forecasting accuracy, the impact of disruptions and avoiding costly mistakes, how to adopt a real-time collaborative approach with vendors, partners and customers, the use of demand-sensing tools to improve demand and forecasting accuracy and supply chain trends and how businesses can prepare for future innovation.
The event will take place 29–31 August 2017, at the Pullman Melbourne, Albert Park.
Logistics and Materials Handling readers can receive a 10 per cent discount off the current early bird rates by referencing VIP code EFXLM1.
Click here to register online.
For more information or to register on, contact Akolade on 02 9247 6000 / registration@akolade.com.au

New supply chain tech for Country Road

In a bid to improve its omni-channel offering and take greater control of its supply chain, Country Road Group has rolled out Manhattan’s Warehouse Management Solution.
The technology deployment is a key component of a business transformation project designed to deliver a unified brand experience for customers across channels and to drive ongoing business growth.
With over 700 stores and a growing online operation, Country Road had outgrown its outsourced logistics services model. The company made the strategic decision to invest in a new distribution centre and chose Manhattan’s solution to orchestrate goods flows through the new DC.
Peter Fouskarinis, Head of Supply Chain Australasia, Country Road Group/David Jones commented, “The Manhattan solution has enabled us to optimise our store replenishment and online order fulfilment processes, resulting in improved product availability and customer satisfaction.”
Raghav Sibal, Manhattan Associates’ managing director for Australia and New Zealand, commented, “We’re confident our solutions will continue to unlock supply chain value for Country Road Group and support its commitment to strengthening customer relationships for many years to come.”

©2019 All Rights Reserved. MHD Magazine is a registered trademark of Prime Creative Media.