Toyota opens new parts warehouse in Western Sydney

After more than 11-months of construction, Toyota Australia has officially opened its largest and newest parts warehouse in Western Sydney.
The Toyota Parts Centre NSW (TPC) is located on a 6.4 hectare site close to a network of motorways and major arterial roads at Kemps Creek, New South Wales.
The TPC will house more than 128,000 parts and will ship approximately 27,000 parts daily.
It features more than 50,000m2 of total work area and class-leading safety and technology, including low-rack storage systems, which will provide a safer and more efficient workplace as employees will no longer need to work at heights to reach parts.
It will also include full separation of man and machine to build in safety, as well as the first use of a fleet of autonomous intelligent vehicles (AIV) to reduce manual carrying of parts.
Toyota Australia President and CEO Matthew Callachor said the project had a goal to be the best global Toyota warehouse in safety, efficiency and sustainability.
“Our commitment, as a mobility company, is to address the environmental challenges that we face, and to contribute to an ever-better society,” Mr Callachor said.
“Embracing green building solutions, cutting CO2 emissions and utilising alternative fuel sources go hand-in-hand with our production plans for new vehicles.
“We are already the leader in fuel-saving hybrid technology and we plan to introduce at least five new hybrid vehicles to our range by mid-2020, including the next generation RAV4 next year,” he said.

As part of Toyota Australia’s plans to reduce the TPC site to zero emissions by 2020, 2,200 solar panels were installed on the warehouse roof earlier this year.
So far, they’ve generated 556,000 kWh or enough energy to power 125 four-person households.
The power generated so far – before the building even became operational – has prevented more than 477 tonnes of greenhouse gases from entering the atmosphere.
Other environmental features built into the site include rainwater tanks for irrigation and toilets, as well as energy efficient LED sensor lights.
The building is cleverly positioned at a specific angle to ensure maximum natural cooling, effectively reducing air-conditioning costs.
For the first time outside of Japan, Toyota Australia will be trialling the use of hydrogen powered Toyota Material Handling fuel cell electric forklifts, with a long-term goal of being able to generate hydrogen on site in the future.
 

How the humble shipping container has revolutionised the way we live

Discover how the humble shipping container has revolutionised the way we live in new outdoor exhibition at the Maritime Museum

Container – the box that changed the world – opens 26 October 2017

In today’s global world you may have drunk coffee from Brazil or a smoothie containing frozen fruit from China. You could be wearing clothes made in India, watching a TV made in Japan, while sitting on a sofa containing wood from Argentina on a laminate floor manufactured in Sweden. All of this has been made possible by a rectangular steel box – the shipping container.
Container, an exciting new exhibition housed entirely in six 20-foot shipping containers at the Australian National Maritime Museum, will lift the lid on the history and impact of containerisation and the way the humble shipping container has revolutionised the way we live.
The exhibition opens in late October, when visitors can literally ‘step inside the box’ to learn about shipping, ports, cargo, the impact of containerisation on the ocean, the origins of everyday objects and even container architecture.

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@iakderboss, via Instagram.

 
Inside the ‘Ship’ container, the history of the cargo industry before the invention of the container and the impact of its introduction are explored. From transporting goods in crates, bales, sacks and barrels loaded by hand, the container now allows the world’s 1.5 million seafarers to deliver 10 billion tonnes of trade each year.
‘Cargo’ looks at trade, customs, biosecurity and how perishable goods are transported around the world in the cold chain. The ‘Port’ container talks about the radical transformation of ports and port cities in Australia and around the world. It also gives visitors a peek behind the scenes at Port Botany, one of Australia’s busiest ports and the gateway for 99 per cent of New South Wales’ container demand.
 
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Peter Le Scelle, courtesy DP World.

 
‘Ocean’ looks at the challenges mass shipping poses to our oceans, including lost shipping containers, cargo spills and acoustic pollution, and the current focus on sustainable shipping.
The quirky and innovative ways containers are used beyond shipping, including ‘small homes’, food trucks, art installations and even swimming pools are uncovered in ‘Build’. ‘Things’ is a glass-fronted container with a shop front–style window display demonstrating the origins of everyday objects in our homes. The total number of kilometres travelled by sea by all the products in this container is 887,082km.
“As an island nation, 99 per cent of Australia’s trade is conducted by sea freight,” said Peter Dexter AM, Chairman of the Australian National Maritime Museum. “The Container exhibition highlights the importance of this industry and how it touches all of us. We are excited to be sharing this often overlooked story to the many people who visit Darling Harbour in such an innovative way.”
The exhibition has been embraced by the shipping industry with a large number of its key organisations coming on board to provide essential support to tell this important story. Major sponsor is NSW Ports, who has played a key role in the development of the exhibition. Sponsors are ACFS Port Logistics, Maritime Container Services, DP World Australia and Smit Lamnalco. Supporters are Transport for NSW and Shipping Australia. The containers are supplied by Royal Wolf and the Precinct Partner is Property NSW. It is supported by the USA Bicentennial Gift Fund.
Container is located in front of the Australian National Maritime Museum’s Wharf 7 building on Pirrama Road. The free exhibition opens on 26 October and will run until late 2018 before touring locations across New South Wales. For further information visit www.anmm.gov.au/container
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Josh Kelly, Jack Harlem Photography, courtesy DP World.

 

Laverton Cold Storage announces expansion

Cold storage service provider Laverton Cold Storage has committed to doubling the size of its recently completed facility located in Truganina in Melbourne’s west, an expansion that will increase the building area of the first-stage development to over 12,000m2.
Laverton Cold Storage completed a 5,920m2 state-of-the-art, temperature-controlled warehouse and blast freezer building in 2015. The expansion, set to be complete in November 2017, will increase its area by 6,520m2.
The expansion will provide additional storage capabilities and expand the facility’s range of temperature-controlled zones for separate product types.
“This most recent expansion highlights our growth and is a testament to the level of service we have been able to provide our existing customer base from our new site,” said Richard Ralph, Managing Director, Laverton Cold Storage. “It has also provided us the opportunity to attract new clients, and we are looking forward to having the fully completed site operational as we amp up for the Christmas period.”
This expansion will focus on environmentally sustainable design, in particular, the use of significant solar power to reduce Laverton Cold Storage’s operating costs and footprint over the term of its lease.
Consultancy firm TM Insight partnered with Laverton Cold Storage in the design and delivery of both stages of developing the purpose-built cold logistics facility.
“The developments have been specifically designed to allow Laverton Cold Storage to offer greater storage capacities in an efficient and optimal manner, while also adhering to the lean principles and cold-chain compliance,” said Nathan Bingham, Director, TM Insight.
“Due to the service Laverton Cold Storage provides, it was also imperative that we focused on sustainable design to ensure operational and energy efficiencies. These cost saving will no doubt provide a competitive advantage.”

Nissan, Mitsubishi building major automotive logistics facility

Nissan Motor Co. Australia and Mitsubishi Motors Australia have announced that they will establish a shared parts and accessories operation in Truganina, Victoria.
The announcement follows Nissan’s recently established global alliance with Mitsubishi Motors, which was formalised in October last year.
The new Australia-based initiative will see both automotive companies share warehousing space and logistics support for the national distribution of each brand’s parts and accessories from an all-new Truganina warehouse facility.
“This is a milestone development in Nissan’s new alliance with Mitsubishi,” said Richard Emery, Managing Director and CEO, Nissan Australia. “This collaboration has opened the door to many important synergies, including the sharing of parts storage, distribution and logistics here in Australia. This is an important investment with many benefits for our respective customers and dealers.”
Mutsuhiro Oshikiri, CEO, Mitsubishi Motors Australia, said this is one of the first alliance-based projects globally. “We are pleased it will assist us to achieve greater efficiency through cooperation with our local alliance partner, Nissan Australia, to deliver a better service to our respective customers,” said Oshikiri.
The new 36,000m2 National Parts Distribution Centre will be one of Australia’s largest automotive logistics facilities and is targeted for build completion by December 2017.
The Truganina facility will become the new master warehouse for Nissan and Mitsubishi’s national distribution network and will also service the Renault and Infiniti brands, both of which fall under the global Renault-Nissan Alliance.
This new warehouse has been designed to meet the requirements for a six-star Green Star rating, the Green Building Council’s highest level of certification for sustainable building design and among Australia’s first six-star energy rated parts distribution centres.

Lean consulting service aims for sustainability

CHEP Asia-Pacific has urged its food supply chain partners to think about sustainable distribution right across the supply chain, not just within company boundaries, to secure the future of an increasingly fragile food supply ecosystem.

Speaking at the Sustainable Supply Chain Forum in Sydney, the President of CHEP Asia-Pacific, Howard Wigham, said all parties would benefit if they minimised operational risks – both physical and environmental – while identifying new opportunities from the changing landscape.

“CHEP recognises that there is an opportunity to help food producers respond to climate change and increasing input costs,” Mr Wigham said. “While our expertise isn’t in food production, we can share our experience in food distribution.”

“In an environment of constrained supply, reducing waste, shrinkage and spoilage throughout the supply chain becomes critical.”

Mr Wigham said CHEP’s expertise in managing reusable, returnable supply chain packaging solutions could play an important role in helping the food industry to respond to sustainability challenges.

Best Results Australia organised the forum. Participants, including some of Australia’s largest food retailers, processors, wholesalers, growers, seed companies, banks and financiers, were told the only way to achieve sustainable agricultural supply throughout Australia’s farming community was through industry collaboration and wide scale change to existing supply chain practice.

The chairman of Best Results, Patrick Byrne, said CHEP could play an important role in reducing waste and input costs.

Mr Wigham said CHEP was seeking opportunities to work more closely with the food industry to ensure knowledge is shared more effectively.

“CHEP is in a unique position to observe the movement of fresh and processed goods through the supply chain – and we operate in 44 countries around the world,” Mr Wigham said.

“We want to build collaborative bridges with our supply chain partners, working with our customers and the industry to remove waste – compressing time, cost and space through lean thinking, reducing environmental footprints through green thinking and reducing physical harm by thinking safe.

“We have listened to our customers and many feel they would benefit from advice on lean consulting. We’re developing a new service in this area and would like to hear from organisations who’d like to participate in a pilot program,” Mr Wigham said.

For more information contact CHEP Asia-Pacific on

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