Furniture company to build $65m DC

Amart Furniture has signed a 10-year lease agreement with Goodman Group to build the distribution centre in the Connectwest Industrial Estate on Logistics Drive, Truganina, which will have an end value of $65 million. TM Insight worked with Amart Furniture to secure the deal.
The purpose-built facility at Truganina will provide a modern workplace for the Amart team, improve quality and service for Amart customers and will accommodate the company’s anticipated future growth when it opens in the first half of 2020.
Amart Furniture CEO Lee Chadwick said the new 48,770sqm custom-designed distribution centre would replace an existing cluster of warehouses in Somerton.
“The new distribution centre will provide a modern, safe and flexible workplace for our warehouse team,” Mr Chadwick said. “This was one of our top priorities when designing the facility.”
Customers will also benefit from the contemporary distribution centre with Amart Furniture COO Scott Pears citing the potential for more efficient service and faster delivery times.
“The new Truganina distribution centre will streamline our supply chain network in Victoria and enable us to continually improve quality and customer service,” Mr Pears said. “This modern and consolidated design will allow for direct-to-customer deliveries, from either in-store or online purchases.”
A comprehensive review process was undertaken at the start of the project in partnership with property and supply chain firm, TM Insight, to evaluate Amart Furniture’s current conditions and operations, design a leading-edge supply chain solution and select the best location for development.
TM Insight Director Travis Erridge said “This review informed the design of the new facility, which will optimise operations into one location, propelling Amart’s supply chain into the next generation.”
When complete, the Truganina distribution centre will have a significant expanse of racked storage locations to house an extensive range of product types and sizes; a drive-around design with dual loading faces; a mix of recessed loading docks and on-grade roller doors; and a cross-docking facility design with two large staging areas for inbound and outbound freight.
 

Boston Dynamics enters logistics market with Kinema Systems acquisition

Boston Dynamics has announced the acquisition of Kinema Systems, a company that enables industrial robotic arms with deep learning technology to locate and move boxes on complex pallets.
Using a combination of vision sensors and deep learning software, Kinema Systems’ Pick technology works with commercial robotic arms to move boxes off pallets to conveyors or build stacks of boxes on pallets.
Pick enables logistics, retail, and manufacturing companies to achieve high rates of box moving with minimal set up or training for both multi-SKU and single-SKU pallets.
“Bringing the Kinema team into Boston Dynamics expands our perception and learning capabilities while the Pick product accelerates our entry into the logistics market. Beyond being a powerful tool for industrial robotic arms, Kinema technology will help our mobile manipulation robots tackle a wide variety of complex real-world tasks,” Boston Dynamics Founder and CEO Marc Raibert said.

 

Toll to reach 80,000sqm at its western Sydney facility

Property development company LOGOS has acquired an additional two hectares of land adjacent to its Prestons Logistics Estate in south west Sydney and is developing a new 14,800sqm facility for Toll Group on the site. The new facility takes Toll’s total gross lettable area (GLA) on the extended estate to 80,000sqm, with a weighted average lease term of 10 years.
LOGOS acquired the initial 25 hectare site in 2016 securing a pre-commitment from Toll for the development of two state-of-the-art logistics facilities with a total GLA of 65,000sqm. The facilities were completed in the first quarter of 2107. The additional land and new Toll facility allows LOGOS to further enhance Prestons Logistics Estate, which on completion will offer a total GLA of 141,000sqm and be valued at circa $300 million.
Global head of property at Toll Chris Noble said: “We currently have two successful facilities at Prestons and are pleased to have the opportunity to service another customer on this estate. LOGOS’ development capability, ongoing asset management and the Estate’s premier location meant this was perfect choice for Toll and our customer”.
Toll joins Volvo Group Australia at the Prestons Logistics Estate, with LOGOS to finalise details for the remaining 65,000sqm of land over the coming months.

Toll upgrades Nike warehouse to be wholly carbon neutral

Toll’s custom-built Nike warehouse in Melbourne’s Altona North has become the first-ever facility in Australia to achieve a whole-of-building carbon neutral certification under the National Carbon Offset Standard (NCOS).
Toll said certification of the Toll-Nike logistics facility, owned by Stockland, caps off its significant investment in energy efficiency at the site, which was named Best Industrial Project at the National Energy Efficiency Awards in 2017. The site’s energy efficiency program featured upgrades to a 2.5 kilometre long conveyor system that is powered by 145 individual electric motors, and the retrofitting of 1,300 light fixtures with high-efficiency LED. This has led to a halving of the site’s total electricity consumption, exceeding the greenhouse reductions required by NCOS.
The site has also received a Green Star Performance rating, the first Green Star rating for Nike and Toll, and the first in Stockland’s Logistics portfolio.
Nike’s operations director Marie Varrasso said the success of the facility reflects the company’s commitment to reducing its carbon footprint while delivering efficient products and savings that can be passed on to its customers directly.
“Through this collaboration continuous improvements have been introduced into the supply chain, which ultimately benefits Nike’s footwear, apparel and equipment customers. It’s a unique relationship, with innovation at the heart of everything we do,” said Ms Varrasso.

Toll Global Logistics president Chris Pearce said it was the partnership between Toll, Nike and Stockland that made the carbon neutral certification and Green Star rating possible.
“Toll and Nike’s partnership began when this facility was built in 1999. It was the first distribution centre to be built by Toll’s specialised warehousing division and, at the time, this type of supply chain asset was virtually non-existent in the market.
“It’s fitting that almost 20 years on, Nike, Toll, and Stockland have been awarded this landmark certification – a testament to our continuous innovation. This is a milestone achievement for all and demonstrates our collective commitment to reducing environmental impacts and introducing smarter, more sustainable solutions across our operations,” added Mr Pearce.

The Toll-Nike facility provides specialised warehousing, picking and dispatch capable of handling more than 27,000 stock keeping units (SKU) and two million units of stock. The 18,000 sqm warehouse and fit-out were designed with environmental efficiency in mind and features:

  • Translucent roof sheeting – to maximise daylight so warehouse lighting can be switched off when ambient light is sufficient.
  • Energy-efficient lighting systems –powered by the latest LED technology suited to Nike’s warehousing needs. The system also improves visibility and safety, and motion sensors have been fitted to limit power usage to occupied areas.
  • Roof insulation – to assist with temperature control.
  • An optimised conveyor system –rewired and reprogrammed to operate in relation to product volumes, eliminating unnecessary movement.

Toll and Nike have offset the remaining greenhouse emissions generated by the building by investing in forest conservation projects in Tasmania as well as in an energy recovery waste water treatment plant in Thailand. These projects protect local biodiversity and native species support jobs in local communities and reduce greenhouse gas emissions.
 

CEVA Logistics expands global partnership with IKEA as it opens New York Distribution Centre

CEVA Logistics and IKEA have celebrated the opening of a new Customer Distribution Center (CDC) at Staten Island on the US east coast.
Under a five-year deal to provide warehouse management and fulfilment services, CEVA will manage the 975,000 sq ft (906,000 sq m) site.
Built on a previously vacant 200 acre piece on land on the west shore of Staten Island, the focus of the new CDC will be on delivering items to customers who order products online or purchase larger items at an IKEA store or Planning Studio for home delivery. The facility is already fully operational and works seven days a week.
Brett Bissell, CEVA’s Chief Operating Officer, Contract Logistics, who represented the company at the recent Grand Opening, told the audience: “We have developed an excellent working relationship with IKEA where we have focused on the cultural alignment between our two companies so that we can deliver the operational excellence IKEA demands every time.
“We’ve used our logistics expertise to design and deliver solid solutions which specifically meet your needs and enable this huge facility to run effectively.  We then combine the skills and experience of our operations managers and supply chain designers to make the building work for you on a day-to-day basis.”
“We are proud to partner with CEVA logistics to operate our new Staten Island fulfilment center, which has brought 200 new jobs in the market,” said Tanja Dysli, Customer Fulfillment Manager, IKEA Retail U.S. “The new facility will help meet the delivery needs of our New York-area customers whether they are shopping in our stores, the IKEA Planning Studio or online.”
CEVA and IKEA have worked together since 2015 with successful working partnerships in the UK and Australia.

Linfox opens warehouse in Vietnam

Linfox has opened a warehouse and distribution centre in Bac Ninh to service Hanoi and the northern Vietnam region.
The new facility is part of a strategic partnership with multinational fast-moving consumer goods company, Unilever.
The 100,000-square-metre site is one of the largest warehouse and distribution centres in northern Vietnam, offering 70,000 pallets positions, 60,000 square metres of ambient storage space and multi-tenancy.
The warehouse is equipped with cutting-edge technology such as a Microlistics system for warehouse management, and radio frequency (RF) devices to complete warehouse activities.
“The facility is strategically located at the VSIP Integrated Township and Industrial Park in Bac Ninh province, 20 kilometres from central Hanoi with connections to all major road systems, ” Linfox International Group CEO, said Greg Thomas.
“This will provide customers easy access to their inventory and will optimise distribution across the region.
“When designing the facility, we focused on incorporating many environmental features.
“The facility features motion sensored LED smart lighting to lower energy consumption and minimise the environmental footprint. We’ve also installed a rainwater harvesting system to reuse the rainwater and reduce the risk of stormwater flooding. This facility represents Linfox’s commitment to sustainability,” he said.
The new Bac Ninh facility is a significant investment for Linfox as the company expands into the Mekong region, with further investments planned in the near future. Operations will commence at the facility in March 2019.

Get your FACT right – from MHD magazine

Mal Walker

People often ask me: what is the secret to distribution centre (DC) design? I’m not sure that I have a secret to share, just logic, common sense, and experience (including a lot of mistakes on the way). However, I will share four design tenets that I’ve found useful and formed into the acronym FACT.

  1. Flow.
  2. Accessibility.
  3. Capacity.
  4. Traceability.
  1. Flow

– is about ensuring that goods can be moved around the DC in an efficient manner. Easy? Not so!
For your facility to flow properly, there are six critical processes to cover:

  1. Receiving.
  2. Inwards goods staging.
  3. Storage.
  4. Picking and packing.
  5. Outwards goods staging.
  6. Dispatch.

Depending on your business, there maybe two additional ones: returns and value-adding tasks.
Bottlenecks and double handling can occur at any one of these points, if flow has not been correctly addressed. How do you know if your flow is suspect? Symptoms include multiple handling of goods, waiting time, pedestrians mixing with forklifts, long travel distances to goods, and accidents.
In planning for optimal flow, it is useful to think ‘one way’, and to allow plenty of room for movement. Avoid giving in to the temptation of jamming storage into a building. If you do, you will more than likely suffer from excessive operating costs. 

  1. Accessibility

This is related to flow. It is critical that all products, in their various forms, e.g. pallets, UBC, cartons, units, litres, etc. are available when they are required. The rule here is: unfettered access to your stock. No blockages, hinderances or bottlenecks. Easy? Not so!

“Avoid giving in to the temptation of jamming storage into a building.”

Too often, operators find that the stock they need to pick is hidden behind banks of other items. Recently I was asked to review a timber yard that specialised in various sizes of timber beams. I noticed that all the same profiles were stored together, regardless of length (which were in 0.3m increments). So, when it came to picking two beams of 5.7m long for an order, the operator spent 42 minutes to complete the pick: 40 minutes to travel to the pick face, move all the other goods, and put them back, and only 2 minutes to pick the required two beams.
In terms of the pick to total time ratio, it is 2/40 or 5%. Only 5% when it should be 90%. In this operation, if we can improve accessibility of stock by providing more pick faces for the range of sizes, we have the potential to improve the ratio by 85%. That’s worth going for.

  1. Capacity

– is about providing enough space within storage modes, for current and future operations. Capacity is related to flow and accessibility – you might have guessed that by now. But here’s a mandate for you. Always provide for enough capacity to satisfy your storage and operational needs. Easy? Not so!
Consider an example that I came across recently. I was asked to review a DC that had outgrown its capacity, to the extent that stock was being stored in aisles and staging areas. This badly affected flow and accessibility. I was told that the DC had 10,000 pallets in capacity. To be sure, I checked, and counted all the locations. Yes, there was indeed 10,000 pallet storage locations!
But something disturbed me. This warehouse was in ‘gridlock’. They could barely operate, and moving pallets in and out required multiple movements. But there was something else: 250 pallets were stored in aisles and staging zones, and 9,000 saleable pallets were recorded as ‘in stock’.
My survey revealed a combination of storage modes, i.e. block stacking, drive-in racking and selective racking. Also, I noticed 150 pallets of returns, and 500 pallets of obsolete stock awaiting write-off by the accountant.
What is the capacity of this warehouse, and what would I advise my customer? Before I cover the maths, here a few truisms to consider:

  1. All storage modes have different utilisation factors.
  2. A warehouse cannot operate at gross capacity.
  3. Obsolete stock and returns take up valuable storage locations and detract from overall efficiency.

So, what is the capacity of this warehouse. My survey of the facility revealed:

  • 1500 pallet spaces (gross) of block-stacking in 5 deep x 3 high configuration.
  • 1000 pallets of drive-in racking in 3 pallets deep x 5 high configuration.
  • 7,500 pallets of selective racking including ground-level pick faces in 5-high configuration.

Now for the maths. To determine capacity, we must consider utilisation factors associated with the use of specific storage modes. Then, we must discount gross capacity to net capacity – net capacity being the maximum that I would recommend to avoid gridlocked operations. Once we have done that, we deduct the non-saleable stock since these pallets are taking up valuable locations for saleable stock.
In this case, my customer has 1,525 more pallets in the facility than it can feasibly operate with. That’s what is causing gridlock, bad flow, lack of access, multiple handling and a capacity crisis.
What should be done to improve the situation?
Firstly, speak to the accountant and purge returns stock and obsolete stock as much as possible, redesign the facility considering alternative storage modes, and if necessary, move excess reserve stock off-site to an alternative facility.
Finally, never forget this truth: never, ever plan your warehouse operations on gross capacity. Only its net capacity.

  1. Traceability

Supposing we have flow, accessibility and capacity nailed. Our next focus is traceability. We must make sure that when stock is moved in, out and around the facility, that it is correctly traced. Easy? Not so!

“Logisticians, please do not forsake the physical, for expediency in recording electronic data.”

With volume increases, expanded ranges of SKU, batch management and use-by-date sequencing, stock management has progressively become more complex. To the point that without sophisticated management and recording systems, operators cannot guarantee accuracy of their operations.
Thus, it’s imperative that distribution centre operators invest in appropriate systems to trace and control stock.
These include radio frequency (RF) scanning equipment and/or voice and visual technologies.
Logistics processes will be different for each DC, but all processes should have a check and confirm transaction sequence tuned to the physical movement of goods. That brings me to the physical vs. electronic rule: physical processes have priority over electronic processes. In other words, design the electronic recording of stock movements to suit the physical process, not the other way around. Sadly, many systems are implemented by well-meaning, but often misguided IT people who do not understand physical logistics. Are you with me? Physical movement is where you burn your costs. Logisticians, please do not forsake the physical, for expediency in recording electronic data.
To recap, applying the FACT tenets, Flow, Accessibility, Capacity and Traceability, is useful to guide one’s thinking in reviewing, designing and running a DC. The outcome of good planning around each of these is reduced risk of gridlock, design flaws and excessive operating costs.
Mal is manager, consulting with the Logistics Bureau, where he works with local and international organisations to guide them in specification preparation, establishment and review of outsourcing contracts. He holds qualifications in engineering, business operations and logistics. For more information contact Mal on 0412 271 503 or email mwalker@logisticsbureau.com.

Emergent Cold acquires Melbourne-based Montague Cold Storage

Texas-based Emergent Cold has announced the acquisition of the Montague Cold Storage facilities in Melbourne.
According to Emergent Gold, this acquisition complements its broader strategy of acquiring and developing a global network of cold chain businesses.
Montagues was founded in 1948, by William (Bill) Montague OAM by purchasing a carting operation that turned the Montague name into a fresh food provider. The first orchard was planted at Narre warren, Victoria in 1950. Innovation continued with the introduction of Controlled Atmosphere storage to Australia in 1967, followed by their first cold storage facility at Allansford in 1989.
“We want to thank all the executives and staff who have contributed to this wonderful business over 60 years.  The Montague family and management team will be focussing our energy and future endeavours in the horticultural industry, where there are many exciting opportunities both nationally and internationally,” Ray Montague, Chairman of Montague Group said.
Emergent Cold was founded in 2017 with the vision to build a global cold chain solution for multinational customers.  Emergent Cold has grown through a combination of business acquisitions and greenfield developments in emerging and developing markets.
“We are delighted to welcome the Montague Cold Storage team to the Emergent Cold network.  Combining Montague’s assets with our national service capability will further strengthen our offering to the Australian and International market,” Neal Rider, CEO of Emergent Cold said.

Ground improvement works complete for new Steelforce warehouse at Port of Brisbane

Design and construction geotechnical specialist Menard Oceania has announced completion of major ground improvement works on behalf of its client, FKG.
With ground improvement works completed ahead of schedule, the Brisbane site, once built, will be a new warehouse for Steelforce, a major distributor of steel products in Australia.
The 25,000m² warehouse project, located in Port West – a rapidly developing industrial estate at the Port of Brisbane – required detailed ground improvement works, as it had been previously subjected to varying levels of surcharging to provide for a 20Kpa loading condition.
Geotechnical conditions encountered on site included a variable profile which was comprised of dense sand, soft to firm Holocene alluvium, and stiff Pleistocene alluvium.
“We established to site in early July 2018 to perform the design and construction of the ground improvement works on behalf of Port of Brisbane Limited (PBPL) and the main contractor FKG Group. Although the site had been previously surcharged, the project loading requirements increased in capacity to meet the needs of Steelforce, which required the entire ground improvement / slab package to be redesigned. We are delighted that Menard’s expertise was considered by the client for the successful and timely delivery of the early foundation works package,” Geoffrey Holding, Northern Region Manager for Menard Oceania said.

A DC for efficiency – from MHD magazine

Vivin Imports is one of Australia’s largest furniture wholesalers supplying major furniture retailers and independents. With recent growth in residential home construction and renovations, Vivin has experienced increased demand for its products across the country.
To accommodate this business growth, the company had to elevate its logistics capability to retain and build on its competitive advantage. The distribution centre was identified as a crucial contributor to supply chain efficiency and effectiveness. The Vivin management felt a critical change was required and committed to a new purpose-built 23,300m² distribution centre.
The next step was to decide how this distribution centre should be fitted out.
Vivin knew that it had capacity constraints in the existing warehouse, and adding to the complication was the regulatory compliance for fire safety coverage, particularly for foam products and mattresses. The new warehouse required a storage fitout to accommodate oversized products and ensure appropriate safety compliance.
The initial layout
Dexion Solutions was invited to put forward a proposal for the new distribution centre based on an existing pallet racking configuration supplied. This consisted of standard selective pallet racking with 2,600mm clear entry bays arranged to 3,420mm aisles throughout the warehouse. Half of this layout was to be fitted with in-rack fire sprinklers.
Experience has shown that this was an industry that adopted a ‘default’ layout, where there was no in-depth operational qualification of client operations undertaken. Based on the understanding that not all products have the same dimensional characteristics and demand profile, it is questionable why many businesses accept this ‘uniform’ arrangement.
It could be that there is a lack of understanding of warehouse operations among many suppliers. This results in them often taking a lowest ‘cost-only’ approach, which drives the design to what is often seen – a ‘default selective rack layout’. Likewise, many clients have a very good understanding of the price and product specifications, but not the value of the total fitout. That’s because this value can be difficult to explain in sufficient detail by those selling the equipment and as a result, both supplier and customer often agree on a ‘default’ layout.
To demonstrate the limitations of this default layout, the supplied 2D drawing was turned it into a 3D render. This gave Vivin a better perspective and understanding of the system with which they would end up, and also allowed the supplier team to highlight any potential shortfalls of the design.
Dexion Solutions go the extra mile to fully analyse the space and develop 3D renders where appropriate to ensure the customer has a thorough understanding of what can be achieved – adding so much more value and insight to the project. This additional stage in planning can also be recognised in ROI well into the future.
Developing a complete system
The team requested design-relevant data, which included a snapshot of inventory, transaction table and the item master. This was then backed up with operational site observation and development of a process logic to support the design. The purpose of this study was to retain what was being done well, as well as engineer out any existing limitations, risks and difficulties where possible.
This is what was found:

  • Standard 2,600mm clear entry bays did not provide optimised storage density for the range of products, so the design was altered to include a calculated combination of 2,600mm and 3,850mm clear entry bays.
  • To account for product overhang and a 100mm longitudinal flue in accordance with fire engineering and AS 4084:2012, this directed the design towards the specification of customised double entry frame depths of 2,106mm and 2,303mm respectively. The basic design only had a single double entry 2,106mm arrangement, which would have restricted the storage of oversized products like sofas.
  • Finally, no elevations were provided in the original design so these had to be calculated. Twelve (12) differing elevations were designed to accommodate the 100mm transverse flue space as per criteria specified in FM8-9.

Now that the storage profiles had been determined, it was time to develop a fully optimised warehouse layout. The storage system had to accommodate non-standard product sizes, all the while balancing productivity with storage.
To achieve this, the layout developed by Dexion Solutions comprised of 1,500 bays of selective Speedlock racking, with different frame depths and bay widths to accommodate variations in product dimensions.

Aisle widths
The original default design had 3,420mm aisles rack to rack, but was this adequate? Let’s consider how the space will be used.
2,100mm width pallets are put away and retrieved at ground level and at height. While the aisles are certainly wider than the pallet, the space doesn’t consider the materials handling equipment that will be used to manoeuvre the pallets. As shown in the diagram, the resulting sweep arc of a forklift turning towards the racking is not considered in the conforming design.
Adhering to a 3,420mm aisle would have resulted in a 343mm aisle width deficit! Aisle widths had to be increased to 3,850mm for operational viability, which was independently verified by the MHE provider. With larger aisle widths, the rack orientation was required to change from North to South to East to West due to the building column grid.
This flagged a significant change to the initial layout and it marked a fundamental change from being a storage-centric design to one that was operationally focused.
In-rack fire sprinklers
The initial layout directed that half the site be fitted with in-rack sprinklers. For this qualification, Dexion Solutions used inventory data and item master lookups to identify all the items that needed additional fire coverage. A line-by-line slotting calculation was applied. This was not as easy task!
From this exercise, it was determined that just over a quarter of the site required in-rack sprinkler coverage, quite a difference from half the site. This area allocation also accounted for likely and predicted storage variations. With a reduced area for in-rack sprinkler coverage, a significant cost saving was instantly realised. Combined with all the previous qualifications, this verification just added another layer to the optimised layout that could not be ignored.
Furniture repair zones
To complete the design, a concept of operations was developed, with staging areas and furniture repair zones laid out. The material flow was calculated along with the operational task sequences. This ensured that both the physical and logical designs were complementary to each other.
Warehouse management system integration
The system logic threads that were recommended could be applied to the warehouse management system (WMS) for configuration to achieve balanced task flows. The pertinent points about the operational sequences were the inclusion of batch and discrete order picking based on order profile waving, pick and drop locations for intermediary task staging, and task interleaving. With both the physical and logical designs undertaken in tandem rather than in isolation, a verifiable, auditable and clearly specified result was planned and achieved.
Labels and end-of-aisle signs
The design of the warehouse location map and the subsequent location labelling specification can be crucial to a project’s success. For Vivin, the Dexion Solutions team used 3,850mm beam lengths, which were mapped out and labelled for three locations per bay instead of the average of two locations across a shorter beam length. This will allow for the storage of one OR two non-standard product sizes whilst also allowing for flexibility to use each level for up to three standard pallets.
The labels are made of polyester with a long-term adhesive, making them ultra-durable and resistant to liquids. A unique feature of these labels is that they can be removed and relocated without tearing, offering even further flexibility for the customer.
End-of-aisle signs were also installed as an identification tool to clearly define the aisles amongst the racking bays.
Safety and compliance
Bay profiles were configured to conform with FM Global Fire Engineering transverse flue requirements. 100mm longitudinal flue space maintained between products for oversized products to conform with fire regulations (FM global requirement) and AS 4084: 2012.

“The material flow was calculated along with the operational task sequences.”

To further enhance the safety of the warehouse, Dexion Solutions also provided the following:

  1. Rack protection

The warehouse storage fitout was further enhanced with rack protection, including specially designed baseplates with heavy duty fixings, front and rear deflection guards, and upright protection. All upright protection used is in safety yellow, as this stands out most prominently against the racking creating a much safer warehouse environment.

  1. Safe working load signs

Safe working load signs were installed for each bay of racking. This ensures the storage systems does not get overloaded by warehouse operators, and meets Australian Safety Standards.

  1. Traffic management plan and line markings

A traffic management plan is crucial to creating optimal traffic flow throughout the warehouse and to minimising any risk of collisions. As part of a good traffic management plan, line markings can effectively segregate pedestrian and materials handling equipment, reducing the potential for accident or injury and ultimately improving overall workplace safety.
Conclusion
The design concentrated on the principle of balancing productivity with storage. All the work done was qualified by analysis, observation and logic, all of which are fundamental in any system design. The client’s interests were always in the equation and Dexion Solutions provided a value proposition, not just materials. This is added value that will be realised every day, year on year.
“The Dexion Solutions team really stood out from the start with their knowledge and comprehensive approach to storage systems, said Vivin Imports national logistics manager Mark Redman.
“Not willing to settle for the standard approach, James Hardy and the Dexion Solutions team analysed our operational data and business goals to completely optimise the warehouse space.
“The team was great to work with and through this experience we have gained insights that will be used to enhance our day-to-day warehouse functions. We’re confident this warehouse fitout will provide the business with a competitive advantage well into the future.”
For more information contact info@dexionsolutions.com.au or visit www.dexionsolutions.com.au. You can also view a video of this project here: https://youtu.be/_wQtCjPAybs.
 
 

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