QME 2014 Preview: Industrial maintenance solutions

Consolidated Plastics & Epoxy (CPE) will showcase their extensive range of industrial plastics, rubber and epoxy products at the Queensland Mining & Engineering (QME) Exhibition, on stand J192 at the Mackay Showgrounds from 22-24 July.

“As an opportunity to showcase our products, there will certainly be nothing better than QME this year. Some people have asked why a leading supplier of industrial plastics, rubber and epoxy products and services like CPE would even bother with expos and tradeshows. However, despite being busy delivering innovative maintenance solutions for our clients, we know there are many more out there that need these solutions and that’s why QME is the platform to market these solutions,” Oliver stated.

Located in the home of QME, Mackay, CPE has been supplying products and services to mines, sugar mills, ports, power stations, fertiliser and other industrial plants for the past 26 years. With an extensive range of products that includes large poly tanks and launders to tiny nylon brushes, from rubber to Teflon, from conveyor guards to pump guards and from chute linings to epoxy coatings for cooling towers; CPE is the optimal choice for maintenance solutions. According to Oliver, the key to CPE’s success has always been to focus on their clients’ needs, offering high levels of technical support and up to date material selection and delivering quality fabrication and on-site services.

“Plastics are just so clever these days and our clients find them indispensable as wear pads and slides, control discs and chute liners. One of our UHMWPE products is even enhanced with additives like glass and carbon to deliver the most amazing wear resistance and slide properties. It’s great! We make a great maintenance partner for our clients by deliberately staying abreast of modern developments in plastics, having our own design team, keeping a lid on client costs and controlling the process from conception through manufacture, installation and performance monitoring. We’re quite confident our clients always receive an optimal engineering solution to their problem,” he said.

At QME 2014, CPE’s sister company Diacon Australia, will also display their patented Diacon Conveyor Improvement System from stand J192. The innovative products making up this system are designed specifically to enhance conveyor safety, increase capacity, reduce spillage and comply with Australian Standards. This innovative system comprises the Diacon Mounting Bracket, Hungry Board, Conveyor Guard and Safety Panel and delivers a range of attractive benefits to clients such as reduced injury potential, lower operational costs and improved productivity outcomes.  

Sandvik launches new high productivity centre in Orange

Sandvik has officially opened a new repair and remanufacturing centre in Orange.

The $5.5 million centre, which will focus on hard rock mining equipment, incorporates a high tech repair and rebuild facility as well as a paint booth and parts warehouse.

When asked why it was opening a new support facility in midst of a mining slowdown, Sandvik Mining’s vice president Jim Tolley stated “mining is always cyclical, and this is a time where we have breathing space to regroup for the future”.

According to Sandvik the Orange facility “has been purpose-built to help it better serve the needs of the mines in the region, and improve safety performance in line with its customer requirements”.

Speaking at the opening, Sandvik’s Jim Tolley said the site is focused on “raising the standards for equipment turnaround and efficiency”.

Tolley went on to say “it incorporates a state-of-the-art workshop and a warehouse, each of which are larger than our entire previous facility in Orange – and because of our standardised processes and readily available spare parts, we can provide rapid and cost-efficient repairs”.

“This includes the ability to rebuild equipment to as-new condition, to Sandvik’s OEM specifications and standards, and with full factory warranty.”

He explained that there is a major focus on aftermarket service for the company, with around 75% of Sandvik’s staff worldwide dedicated to customer support, and an aim to increase efficiency in the area.

“In the aftermarket we haven’t see very high productivity gain, which is why we’re introducing the high productivity methodology in to the aftermarket business. We’re focusing on driving out waste in aftermarket and support.”

Sandvik are doing this by “looking at the process in a holistic way and investigating lean systems and six sigma”.

In doing this, Tolley said the company has cut the average remanufacture time from 15 000 hours down to 10 000 hours, and is looking at driving it even further down”.

Sandvik’s productivity manager Drew Zammitt explained that has been done b “applying different rebuild techniques over traditional technical, and creating lean rebuild bays to limit excessive movement”.

The facility will also house field service technicians.

Our field service technicians can also carry out machine inspections, advise on operational and maintenance practices, and assist customer technicians,” Tolley said.

“Whether it’s scheduled or unscheduled maintenance calls, our field service technicians have the in-depth product knowledge and rapid support response to get customers’ equipment up-and-running as soon as possible.

According to workers on the site, the technicians can get as many as three to four call-outs a day over the weekend.

The facility will employ approximately 40 people on site, but may expand as more nearby mines come online, and major expansions such as East Cadia, occur.

“We can currently do about four times the current level of work at this facility,” Tolley said, “without expanding the site, but we do expect more work once Cadia expands and East Cadia comes online.”

The centre is one of four nationally, with the others located in Perth – focusing on hard rock mining; Heatherbrae – focusing on coal mining for NSW; and Mackay, which focuses on coal and hard rock mining.

During the launch the company also announced that it will be releasing an automated production and development drill next year, with Sandvik explaining that “we’re looking to take more information from the face during operation and bring in more mining planning software, and automation will allow us to do this”.

​Sandvik launches new high productivity centre in Orange

Sandvik has officially opened a new repair and
remanufacturing centre in Orange.

The $5.5 million centre, which will focus on hard rock
mining equipment, incorporates a high tech repair and rebuild facility as well
as a paint booth and parts warehouse.

When asked why it was opening a new support facility in
midst of a mining slowdown, Sandvik Mining’s vice president Jim Tolley stated “mining
is always cyclical, and this is a time where we have breathing space to regroup
for the future”.

According to Sandvik the Orange facility “has been
purpose-built to help it better serve the needs of the mines in the region, and
improve safety performance in line with its customer requirements”.

Speaking at the opening, Sandvik’s Jim Tolley said the site
is focused on “raising the standards for equipment turnaround and efficiency”.

Tolley went on to say “it incorporates a state-of-the-art
workshop and a warehouse, each of which are larger than our entire previous
facility in Orange – and because of our standardised processes and readily
available spare parts, we can provide rapid and cost-efficient repairs”.

“This includes the ability to rebuild equipment to as-new
condition, to Sandvik’s OEM specifications and standards, and with full factory
warranty.”

He explained that there is a major focus on aftermarket
service for the company, with around 75% of Sandvik’s staff worldwide dedicated
to customer support, and an aim to increase efficiency in the area.

“In the aftermarket we haven’t see very high productivity
gain, which is why we’re introducing the high productivity methodology in to
the aftermarket business. We’re focusing on driving out waste in aftermarket
and support.”

Sandvik are doing this by “looking at the process in a
holistic way and investigating lean systems and six sigma”.

In doing this, Tolley said the company has cut the average
remanufacture time from 15 000 hours down to 10 000 hours, and is looking at
driving it even further down”.

Sandvik’s productivity manager Drew Zammitt explained that
has been done b “applying different rebuild techniques over traditional
technical, and creating lean rebuild bays to limit excessive movement”.

The facility will also house field service technicians.

Our field service technicians can also carry out machine
inspections, advise on operational and maintenance practices, and assist
customer technicians,” Tolley said.

“Whether it’s scheduled or unscheduled maintenance calls,
our field service technicians have the in-depth product knowledge and rapid
support response to get customers’ equipment up-and-running as soon as
possible.

According to workers on the site, the technicians can get as
many as three to four call-outs a day over the weekend.

The facility will employ approximately 40 people on site,
but may expand as more nearby mines come online, and major expansions such as
East Cadia, occur.

“We can currently do about four times the current level of
work at this facility,” Tolley said, “without expanding the site, but we do
expect more work once Cadia expands and East Cadia comes online.”

The centre is one of four nationally, with the others
located in Perth – focusing on hard rock mining; Heatherbrae – focusing on coal mining for NSW; and Mackay, which focuses on coal and hard rock mining.

During the launch the company also announced that it will be
releasing an automated production and development drill next year, with Sandvik
explaining that “we’re looking to take more information from the face during
operation and bring in more mining planning software, and automation will allow
us to do this”.

When Size Does Matter: Overcoming the Problem of Incorrectly Specified Conveyor Rollers

With today’s global market, the industrialised world has developed international standards to ensure that retrofitting of aftermarket machine parts can be easily achieved, regardless of where in the world the part originated. 

Unfortunately, the conveyor industry seems to be lacking in this initiative, which can cause major headaches for the maintenance engineers of conveyor
components.

Although in Australia there are manufacturing  standards for conveyor rollers, the increase in imported machinery means that it is almost impossible for machinery operators to stick to even local standards. 

Imported machinery can lead to expensive roller replacement, as rollers are often sold as a “machine spare part” and not just a standard conveyor roller.

To reduce their maintenance costs, conveyor operators then turn to the local market for spares such as conveyor rollers and this is where problems can occur. 

To the untrained, a small variation in the length or diameter of a conveyor roller may seem insignificant, but the effect of installing the wrong size roller can ultimately be quite devastating structurally and costly to operations. 

Incorrect belt tracking can result in supports getting butchered in an attempt to make a roller fit.

For nearly 3 decades, bulk materials handling supplier Kinder & Co has focused on solving conveyor issues. 

Neil Kinder, CEO of Kinder, explained that “if correctly done, modifying the roller supports to accommodate the length of the roller may allow the new roller to be installed and operate properly.  But what happens the next time this roller is replaced?  If the same part isn’t supplied, a sloppy or incorrect fit may result in incorrect belt tracking and other potentially major high maintenance problems".

“Whereas correctly specified conveyor rollers will minimise downtime, reduce maintenance labour costs and reduce the often hidden additional costs associated with lost  product.  Also, correctly specifying conveyor rollers means more than just supplying “rough measurements”.  Providing an accurately measured roller length to a supplier can be the difference between a quick installation and a long maintenance shut down and this difference in operational efficiency can be measured in financial terms.

“Conveyor belt tracking is arguably one of the most common headaches for conveyor maintenance engineers and accurately specifying the correct diameter of a conveyor roller can eliminate one potential cause of this problem. 

Again, with so many options available “rough measurements” will lead to the wrong diameter roller being supplied, so accurate measurement of the diameter is essential.”

 

New rail depot in Carrington gets the go ahead

Plans to build a 24-hour rail maintenance facility in Carrington have been approved by Newcastle City Council.

The council voted eight to three to approve the $4million development which includes extending a rail spur line and building three new workshops.

More than 80 conditions will be imposed on the project including restricting night operations to a single workshop and the construction of a 5.5metre acoustic wall along Elizabeth Street, Newcastle Herald reported.

A council meeting held last night showed concern around how the facility would affect locals.

Cr Michael Osborne said the council needed to support residents being exposed to industrial areas.

Osborne tried to limit the workshop’s operations to between 7am and 10pm on most days but was unsuccessful.

‘‘The residents that live across the road have a right to get a good night’s sleep … they have a right to enjoy their own home with a reasonable amenity,’’ Osborne said.

‘‘The fact that this is part of the port and part of the industrial area that we want to go ahead is beside the point.

 ‘‘We have to take account that people live across the road.’’

However, Cr David Compton said it was ‘‘vitally important that we support our industries and it’s vitally important that we support our communities that live in close proximity to them’’.

‘‘Given the applicant has made significant changes to attenuate the noise, I see there is no real reason we can reject this,’’ Compton said.

Image: theherald.com.au

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