Ports Australia CEO calls for freight balance

Mike Gallacher, CEO of Ports Australia, has told the Australian Parliamentary Standing Committee on Infrastructure, Transport and Cities that government must show leadership in addressing the freight imbalance to deal with the future freight task.
“Figures show that the country’s freight task is set to double and that our current and future spend on roads and rail will not be adequate to meet the requirement of the incoming freight tsunami,” said Gallacher.
“Over the last 25 years domestic sea freight has grown by one per cent, where rail has grown by 210 per cent and road, 61 per cent.
“For a maritime nation with over 70 ports strategically located right around our country, each with road and rail access, each with maritime related industry nearby, in either a capital city or regional town, a continuation of this imbalance surely is not in our national interest.
“Ports are intrinsically linked to our prosperity, ensuring that the gateways to Australia’s economy are healthy and vibrant is only a good thing for all Australia.”

VISA Global Logistics joins MEGATRANS2018

Award-winning Australian international logistics company and freight forwarder, VISA Global Logistics, is joining inaugural supply chain event, MEGATRANS2018, to showcase its service offerings.
VISA Global Logistics CEO, Simon Hardwidge, said that MEGATRANS2018 is not just about equipment suppliers, it embraces the entire freight and logistics chain.
“As a global enterprise with dealings with importers, exporters, retailers and manufacturers, VISA Global Logistics is seizing an important opportunity to represent at MEGATRANS2018 to demonstrate how we add value to our clients,” said Hardwidge.
“As one of Australia’s largest privately-owned international freight forwarding companies, we have an extensive global network that continues to grow.
“Last year alone, the company acquired offices in India, Spain and the Netherlands while opening new facilities in Italy. In order to remain competitive, and to look to the future, it is vital for businesses in the freight and logistics space to push innovation and share ideas.”
VISA Global Logistics was awarded the Freight Forwarder of the Year Award at the 2017 Australian Shipping & Maritime Industry Awards.
MEGATRANS2018 aims to bring together leaders and stakeholders in the wider Australian and international supply chain, including those in the transport, logistics, warehousing solutions, materials handling and infrastructure sectors.

Australian logistics veterans recognised in 2018 Honours List

The Australia Day 2018 Honours List has celebrated of several logistics experts for their contributions to the industry.
The Order of Australia recognises outstanding members of the community, it was established in 1975 by Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II, replacing the established British honours system, the Imperial awards.
The Order of Australia has four levels – Companion of the Order (AC), Officer of the Order (AO), Member of the Order (AM) and Medal of the Order (OAM), in two divisions: general and military.
Dr Rosalie Pam Balkin has been made an Officer of the Order, for “distinguished service to maritime law through roles with a range of organisations, to the improvements of global shipping transport safety and standards, and to education as an academic and author.”
Balkin has served of the Advisory Council of the Australian and New Zealand Institute of Maritime Law, with the International Maritime Organisation, and has published several works on international maritime law, human rights law and public international law.
The late Hartmut Krtschil has been made a Member of the Order, for “significant service to biosecurity and quarantine systems, to compliance development and to the freight transport industry.”
Krtschil chaired the Industry Cargo Consultative Committee, Australia Quarantine and Inspection Service and other industry committees, was the New South Wales State Manager of the Liner Services in his early career, and gained freight industry experience working in Seaton’s Freight Terminal in the early 1990s.
Graeme Archibald Walker was also commended, for his service to the airfreight transport sector. Walker worked at CSL, MSAS Cargo International and Wathen Jardine Air Cargo, and served on the Airfreight Forwarders Association of Australia, the Victoria Airfreight Council and the Australia Arab Chamber of Commerce committees, among others.

First keynote confirmed for Global Shippers Forum

The Freight & Trade Alliance (FTA) and the Australian Peak Shippers Association (APSA) have revealed the first keynote speaker for the Global Shippers Forum and ICHCA International Conference 2018 on 10–11 May 2018, to be held at the MEGATRANS2018 trade event at the Melbourne Convention & Exhibition Centre.
Ana Hinojosa, Director – Compliance and Trade Facilitation at the World Customs Organisation (WCO), will present on 10 May.
Hinojosa was elected Director of the World Customs Organisation’s Compliance and Trade Facilitation unit in January 2016, and previously was President of the Executive Women in Government organisation in the US, and Deputy Assistant Commissioner at US Customs and Border Protection.
This is the first time Hinojosa has been in Australia to meet the local customs broker and freight forwarder community. She will be presenting on existing and emerging trade facilitation projects and the future of global customs compliance.
Click here to register for the conference or to find out more.
Early-bird rates are currently available for members of the following organisations:
Australian Peak Shippers Association (APSA)
International Cargo Handling Coordination Association (ICHCA)
Container Transport Alliance of Australia (CTAA)
Australian Cotton Shippers Association (ACSA)
Australian International Movers Association (AIMA)
Australian Horticulture Association (AHEA)
Women’s International Shipping & Trade Association (WISTA)
Freight & Trade Alliance (FTA)

Australian Maritime College launches new logistics degrees

Tasmania-based Australian Maritime College will offer two new degrees from 2018 – the Bachelor of Global Logistics and Maritime Management (Honours) and the Master of Logistics Management (Advanced).
According to Dr Peggy Chen, Interim Head – Department of Maritime and Logistics Management, logistics is the key to international trade and the new degrees will help support the developing needs of the important sector.
“We are very excited to see these two degrees offered to keep our advantage in providing a unique undergraduate degree with two cores – global logistics and maritime management, and to provide specialised logistics management at master level,” said Dr Chen.
The Bachelor of Global Logistics and Maritime Management (Honours) is a four-year program designed to prepare students for management careers in the maritime and logistics industry.
The course combines core business principles, such as accounting and finance, business law, international business management, and strategic management, with industry-specific learning, such as port and terminal management, ship operations management, maritime economics, logistics management and supply chain management.
The Master of Logistics Management (Advanced) is a two-year program designed for people seeking professional careers in the global domain of logistics management, logistics strategies and supply-chain management.
The program provides theoretical, practical and applied knowledge suitable for both higher-level professional and managerial roles.
Dr Chen said the decision to offer the new courses now is deliberate, reflecting industry needs and capitalising on the demand for specialists.
“AMC was among the first to observe that traditional shipping companies suddenly transformed into more of logistics service providers, because this was where the demand was and continues to be. The maritime and logistics industries underpin international business and world trade,” she said.
The Bachelor of Global Logistics and Maritime Management (Honours) replaces the Bachelor of Business (Maritime and Logistics Management), which Dr Chen said has reflected industry needs for more than a decade.
In the development of the Master of Logistics Management (Advanced), AMC seeks to respond to the expected increased demand for specialists in areas such as logistics management, supply chain management, warehousing and procurement.
It follows three market surveys conducted in 2016 which focused on the potential for growth in student enrolments in the postgraduate space, for prospective student cohorts from either Australia or overseas, including countries such as India, China and South-East Asia.
“Further provision of education in logistics management through these new courses will build AMC’s reputation in providing specialised workforces and experts in facilitating or managing Australia and international supply chains, in particular in the maritime supply chain,” said Dr Chen.

DP World opens Botany Intermodal

DP World Logistics Australia has opened its Botany Intermodal site, with the official launch ceremony led by the Hon. Melinda Pavey, Minister for Roads, Maritime and Freight – New South Wales.
Paul Scurrah, Managing Director and CEO; and Mark Hulme, Chief Operating Officer – Logistics, customers, industry stakeholders and employees joined Minister Pavey in opening the site in Port Botany.
Scurrah dedicated the opening of the event to Anil Wats, DP World Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer, who recently passed away.
Minister Pavey spoke about the important role of New South Wales’ intermodal facilities and rail networks facilitating the movement of export goods through our ports from regional areas.
Hulme thanked the DP World Logistics Australia team for their work in launching the new site.

Infrastructure minister calls for maritime membership upgrade

Darren Chester, Minister for Infrastructure and Transport, says Australia is seeking to upgrade its International Maritime Organisation (IMO) membership to Category B.
Chester said World Maritime Day, celebrated this year on Wednesday 27 September, was a day to celebrate shipping and highlight Australia’s campaign to move up from Category C on IMO’s governing Council.
“Category B more accurately reflects Australia’s status as a state with a large interest in international seaborne trade,” Chester said.
“Australia is the world’s largest bulk commodities exporter, with deep interests in protecting our marine environment and servicing a search and rescue area that covers one-tenth of the earth’s surface.
“Category C is for states with a special interest in maritime transport or navigation and whose election to the Council ensures the representation of all major geographic areas of the world.”
He said that Australia’s election to Category B would allow the country to continue to work closely with IMO member states to develop balanced and evidence-based policy on issues important to trade efficiency and maritime safety and protecting the marine environment.
“Shipping directly supports Australia’s economy and essentially all of our exports—agricultural products, including wheat and wool, minerals such as iron ore, and energy,” he added.
“Creating the conditions in which international shipping can operate safely, efficiently and with minimal environmental impact is important to the Australian Government.”
Check out the message below from IMO Secretary-General Ki Tack Lim on this year’s theme, ‘Connecting Ships, Ports and People’.

ALC safety summit insight to shape future strategy

The Australian Logistics Council (ALC) identified a number of priority areas at the its Supply Chain Safety & Compliance Summit that will form the basis of its efforts to improve supply chain safety over the year ahead.
The event was held in Sydney this week, and featured an address by the Hon. Melinda Pavey MP, NSW Minister for Roads, Maritime and Freight, as well as a keynote presentation by Sarah Bell, UK Traffic Commissioner for London and the South East of England, focusing on the central role of UK Traffic Commissioners in managing risks to road safety.
“The Summit, which was attended by more than 280 people from across the supply chain, reinforced ALC’s position as Australia’s leading industry advocate for supply chain safety and compliance,” said Michael Kilgariff, Managing Director, ALC.
“As the Summit’s opening video noted, Chain of Responsibility (CoR) is all about safety. These two days were an invaluable opportunity for industry representatives to recommit to continuous improvement, learn more about effective safety practices, and consider how to apply these techniques in their own day-to-day operations.”
A core focus of the Summit was the upcoming changes to Chain of Responsibility obligations under the Heavy Vehicle National Law (HVNL), and the development of a Registered Industry Code of Practice (Master Code) to assist CoR compliance.
“Through a series of consultative workshops, attendees also had the opportunity to directly shape the content of the Master Code for heavy-vehicle safety, currently being developed by ALC in partnership with the Australian Trucking Association (ATA),” added Kilgariff.
As a result of the discussions that occurred at the Summit, the ALC has identified a number of key themes, and the actions flowing from these will form the basis of ALC’s safety-related work program over the coming year. These are:
1. The Master Code is a significant step – but it can’t solve all the problems. 
The ALC will work to ensure it is comprehensive resource for industry – but organisations will still need to consider their own operational circumstances when thinking about CoR compliance.
2. Continuous improvement in safety is a core aspect of freight’s social licence. 
The ALC will work with industry and governments to highlight the improved technology and safety features of modern heavy vehicles to contribute to improved safety for all road users, including passenger vehicles.
3. Safety is a shared responsibility. 
The ALC will continue working to highlight this within the industry and in other sectors, especially given the increased CoR obligations of directors/executive officers from mid-2018. Driving continuous improvement in compliance is both good community practice and good business practice.
4. There is scope to make greater use of telematics and technology in safety.
The ALC will continue to advocate for the compulsory use of telematics to improve safety, as well as the removal of legislative and regulatory barriers that prevent the uptake of technology that improves safety and productivity.
5. CoR compliance will increasingly factor into procurement and contract arrangements. 
Both governments and listed companies are writing CoR compliance requirements into contractual arrangements, and won’t deal with businesses that can’t demonstrate compliance. Through the delivery of the Master Code, ALC will assist businesses to develop procedures they need to not only ensure compliance, but also demonstrate it.
6. Training is vital. 
Businesses need to make certain their employees (and subcontractors) understand their CoR obligations. The ALC will emphasise the importance of building CoR compliance components into training employee training modules – for both new and existing employees.
7. Relatively low cost of entry to industry poses safety risks. 
Often new entrants to the sector are failing to invest adequately in vehicle safety and CoR compliance. The ALC will continue our advocacy on operator licensing/compliance and work with regulators to encourage a particular focus on compliance in this area of the market, especially given anticipated growth in e-commerce and peer-to-peer freight delivery models.
8. Executives need to understand CoR compliance and effectiveness of their organisation’s systems. 
Board reporting on CoR is not just a good way of ensuring obligations are being complied with – but is also a good way of keeping safety issues a priority for businesses. The ALC will continue to work with industry to develop metrics for CoR board reporting that makes the information provided to executives meaningful, and capable of driving safety and business improvement.
9. Heavy vehicles are still overrepresented in accident and fatality statistics – even though heavy vehicle drivers are not always the party at fault. 
Trend lines have started to run the wrong way – and this is not a time for complacency. The ALC will engage with law-enforcement and regulatory agencies to help determine what factors are driving this (including illicit drug use), and assist with the development and delivery of strategies to combat them.
10. Messages about load restraint/overloading are still not penetrating the whole of the industry. 
The ALC will continue to support regulators’ efforts to promote this critical safety issue, particularly among smaller and independent operators.

ICHCA International to honour International Maritime Organization

The International Cargo Handling Coordination Association (ICHCA) International will award the International Maritime Organization (IMO) with the inaugural John Strang A.O. Memorial Award at the ICHCA’s 65th anniversary conference in October in Las Palmas.
The IMO has been selected for the award due to its work in improving safety in the cargo-handling industry.
The John Strang A.O. Memorial Award has been created to recognise dedication to the development of the cargo handling industry, including achievements that have led to improvements in efficiency, effectiveness, health and safety, as well as the organisation or individual being a catalyst for positive change and innovation within the industry.
The judging panel noted that IMO’s continued regulatory and guidance work fulfilled all the stated criteria.
The award was named for John Strang, a pioneer and ambassador of ICHCA throughout his lifetime whose father was involved in its establishment in the 1950s.
John Strang A.O. passed away in September 2016. Sallie Strang, Board member of ICHCA International and John Strang’s daughter said, “We are thrilled that ICHCA have chosen to honour our father by launching this award in his name and we cannot think of a more worthy recipient than the International Maritime Organization.”

Inland Rail funding could be spent on shipping, says MUA

The Maritime Union of Australia (MUA) has stated that it feels that some of the money earmarked for the $8.4 billion Melbourne-to-Brisbane Inland Rail project could be better spent on investment in Australia’s coastal shipping sector.
MUA National Secretary Paddy Crumlin said that while the MUA agrees Australia should be trying to get trucks off the roads, the sea offers the best alternative.
“Port infrastructure already exists in Australia and coastal shipping leaves the lowest carbon footprint when it comes to moving goods around our coast,” Crumlin said.
“This package from the Government looks a lot like pork-barrelling by the Coalition to protect their inland seats through regional Victoria, NSW and Queensland as they desperately try to stave off the threat from One Nation and other parties.”
“A strong domestic shipping fleet makes absolute sense from a national security, fuel security, and environmental standpoint,” Crumlin added.

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