CEVA Logistics announces leadership change for Australia

CEVA Logistics has appointed Milton Tadeau Pimenta as Managing Director of its Australia and New Zealand cluster.
Currently head of Contract Logistics in South America for the company, Pimenta will take up his position in January 2019, reporting directly to CEO, Xavier Urbain.
He takes over from Carlos Velez Rodriguez who is leaving CEVA to pursue other career opportunities but who will work with Pimenta to ensure a smooth handover.
Pimenta joined CEVA 17 years ago and is a results driven, performance-focused team leader with a wealth of experience across both Freight Management and Contract Logistics. He has previously lived in both Australia and Asia and has extensive knowledge of the industry there.
Speaking about Pimenta’s promotion to his new role Urbain said: “Milton is a very astute operator with an energetic, commercial mind. He is a true team motivator who is ideally placed to lead the Australia & New Zealand cluster in the next step of its development. I also want to thank Carlos for his valuable contribution in the turnaround of the business there and for developing one of the most impressive Contract Logistics campuses we have in the CEVA world”.
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We could learn from NZ Quarantine

Peter McRae

Australia faces a biosecurity risk due to an inadequate risk assessment of wood materials found in packaging materials. Our neighbours across the Tasman have a risk assessment process from which Australia’s Department of Agriculture and Water Resources (DAWR) could learn and which, I would argue, would be a huge improvement to our current process.
In a nutshell, Australia doesn’t check containers, meaning wooden packaging that has not been fumigated is slipping across our borders undeclared and unchecked.
I refer in particular to the processing of Less Than Container Load (LCL) shipments.
In the Australian context, LCL require a one-page packing declaration that identifies and ‘risk-assesses’ any wood used as packaging and further whether any wood has been treated to Australian biosecurity standards. If wood is contained and has not been treated, it needs to be inspected, treated or disposed. There are a few issues with this process:

  1. The person filling out the packing declaration is either the supplier or the packer; both commercially connected to the importer and therefore with a potential conflict of interest.
  2. DAWR doesn’t physically check LCL cargo to ensure that forms have been accurately completed.
  3. The template is only supplied in English regardless of the language of the person completing the document, usually an international supplier. I have often wondered how many of the people filling out the form even understand the language on the form.
  4. The form has been changed three times in the past two years.

There is no surprise then, to learn that the forms are frequently incorrect and as a customs broker, I commonly need to ask the supplier to prepare another declaration to bring it to the new standard, or to ask if the answers are accurate. But not all LCL shipments are assessed by a customs broker, self-assessed clearances under the tax-free threshold can be completed by anyone.
If Australia is to keep its borders safe from biosecurity risks, it needs to be sure that the risks are not slipping under its nose, and for that we can look to New Zealand’s process.
New Zealand, generally regarded to be more responsible for its pristine environment, doesn’t require packaging declarations for LCL cargo. Instead, all LCL cargo is inspected at the unpacking depot before the cargo is released. A system of thorough checks like this is positive because, from the get-go, suppliers and importers know that cargo will be checked, which means that they will self-regulate to meet quarantine requirements in order to avoid storage and or further fees. The process is effective.
In the past 12 months, DAWR has changed its one-page packing declaration three times in order to improve its accuracy. But it is still only in English. It is still only filled out by the importer’s people and it is still not checked against the cargo.
I would argue, therefore, that it still holds little value. Changing the document doesn’t solve the problem, physically checking the containers would.
Peter McRae is the principal of Platinum Freight Management.

New Zealand gets closer with 767-300F freighter

DHL Express has introduced a Boeing 767-300F freighter aircraft that has 50% more cargo capacity for its Trans-Tasman lane. The Boeing 767, which replaces the Boeing 757, will offer express, overnight delivery between Sydney and Auckland five times a week as the Trans-Tasman remains one of the key trade lanes for DHL Express Australia.
Based on the latest figures from the DHL Export Barometer 2017, New Zealand remains the top export market for Australian businesses, with 61% of exporters sending goods across the Trans-Tasman trade lane and one in four of them naming New Zealand as their largest export market.
CEO and senior vice president of DHL Express Oceania Gary Edstein said: “As an international air express carrier, aviation is at the core of our business. The Boeing 767 aircraft will enhance the efficiency and speed of delivery, with the latest technology for communications, navigation, enhanced safety systems, and automated roller systems to assist with loading and unloading.
“We are incredibly proud to be the only logistics company with a dedicated aircraft across the Trans-Tasman lane. Over the last decade, trade between Australia and New Zealand has steadily increased, making New Zealand one of our largest services trade partner. And with this purpose built freighter aircraft, we will ensure that we remain competitive for many years to come.”

DHL says the Boeing 767 offers operational flexibility, and an all-digital flight deck allows it to support time-critical deliveries. It also boosts high fuel efficiency with a proven combination of light, durable aluminium alloy and composite structure, making it lighter than comparable freighters.
The aircraft is equipped with powered cargo-handling equipment, both on the main deck and in lower holds, making cargo handling easier and more seamless. The cargo-handling system and operator interface provide complete automation of the cargo-loading process. The freighter’s main deck has both interior and exterior master control panels along with local control panels to provide maximum flexibility.

DB Schenker Australia officially opens NSW mega-facility

In December, DB Schenker opened its doors to its new Hoxton Park, New South Wales, logistics facility – details about which were revealed in October.
The grand opening was officiated by Matthias Cormann, Minister for Finance and Deputy Leader of the Government in the Senate. DB Schenker also hosted Liverpool City Council Mayor Wendy Waller, as well as customers and partners.
“The investment into this facility is for our customers, our staff and our environment,” said Ron Koehler, CEO of DB Schenker Australia and New Zealand. “We expect over the next few years to operate significantly more sustainably, but also continue to develop our processes within our new facility, to operate in the most efficient and cost-effective manner into the near future. Together with our customers and staff members, it is a great occasion to set this milestone in the company’s history.”

the ribbon-cutting ceremony for DB Schenker Australia's Hoxton Park facility, December 2017. Image courtesy DB Schenker.
The ribbon-cutting ceremony for DB Schenker Australia’s Hoxton Park facility, December 2017.
Image courtesy DB Schenker.

 

Packaging scholarship launched

The Packaging Council of New Zealand (PAC.NZ) is launching a new annual Scholarship program in conjunction with the Australian Institute of Packaging that will give a packaging technologist, designer or engineer in New Zealand the opportunity to complete aDiploma in Packaging Technology, to the value of $9,000.
“The association is extremely proud to be able to offer the scholarship to a New Zealand packaging professional each year,” commented Harry Burkhardt, President, Packaging Council of New Zealand.
“The packaging industry is dynamic and diverse, offering career opportunities across a wide scope of disciplines. PAC.NZ has been representing businesses in the packaging industry in New Zealand since 1992 and recognises that investment in the packaging industry starts with investment in its people. We strongly encourage everyone in the industry to apply for this scholarship.
“The Diploma in Packaging Technology is a Level 5 qualification which is internationally recognised for those wishing to pursue a career in the packaging industry or for those who are already in the industry and who wish to extend their knowledge and expertise. The Diploma in Packaging Technology prepares students to take responsibility for packaging operations at any level through the supply chain. The qualification is comprehensive, and provides an opportunity to study the principles of packaging, packaging materials and packaging processes.”
Diploma in Packaging Technology students come from a variety of backgrounds and disciplines, and are typically experienced practitioners or managers in technical, sales/marketing, QA, purchasing, engineering or design.
Entries are now open with submissions closing on the 23rd of February 2018. The winner of the inaugural Packaging Council of New Zealand Scholarship will be announced at the 2018 Packaging & Processing Innovation & Design Awards, which will be held alongside the prestigious international WorldStar Packaging Awards on 2 May.

Port of Melbourne potentially limited by containership growth

A report produced by the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) on the country’s stevedores has suggested that Port Botany has overtaken the Port of Melbourne for container trade due to constraints at the Victorian port, as first reported by The Age.
In 2016/17, Port Botany handled 34 per cent of Australia’s container movements, with 33 per cent going through the Port of Melbourne – down from 36 per cent in 2015/16.
While the report did not directly link the Port of Melbourne’s reduced volume to the increasing size of container ships, it noted that it is the most likely port to put limits on the size of ships visiting the country.
The Age noted that the biggest ship to visit Australia, the 347-metre Susan Maersk that docked at the Port of Brisbane in October, would have been unable to travel up the mouth of the Yarra River to Swanson Dock, and its 10,000 TEU (twenty-foot equivalent unit) load may or may not have managed to fit underneath the West Gate Bridge.
In a recent newsletter, industry body Shipping Australia wrote that with only one terminal able to take the larger ships – Webb Dock, with Swanson Dock out of reach – “Melbourne is already the limiting factor for the size of ships coming to Australia’s east coast ports and is preventing Australians benefiting from the efficiencies of larger ship operations.”
“The risk is that shipping lines may consider by-passing Melbourne for Adelaide or Sydney and use rail, or a smaller ship feeder service (possibly from New Zealand) to make the connection,” it added.
“This would ultimately cost the Victorian consumer, the Port of Melbourne and the state economy.”

DB Schenker to acquire NZ firm SB Global Logistics

DB Schenker and SB Global Logistics have entered into a definitive agreement under which DB Schenker will acquire SB Global Logistics from 24 September 2017.
“DB Schenker NZ has enjoyed a 20-year relationship with SB Logistics, from which we have seen both companies grow together off the back of mutual respect and confidence in service,” said Mark Harrison, Director – New Zealand, DB Schenker AU/NZ.
“This relationship has endured through many challenging global climates, always showing resilience and trust in achieving the foundations of our agreement.  The backbone of this relationship has led us to today, where we begin our process of merging the two organisations with absolute confidence given our extensive knowledge of how each work.”
Stephen Bateman, Director, SB Global Logistics added, “This purchase has been well thought out with due consideration to the future of SB Global Logistics business, staff and customers.
“SB Global Logistics Christchurch has grown over the past 27 years to become a well-respected and trusted organisation. This is a credit to a team of people who have shown tremendous dedication and resilience, and always striving to achieve a high level of service.”
The operations of SB Global Logistics Christchurch will continue ‘business as usual’ under its new owner, DB Schenker, and its management team will remain in the business to ensure a smooth transition.

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