Toyota opens new parts warehouse in Western Sydney

After more than 11-months of construction, Toyota Australia has officially opened its largest and newest parts warehouse in Western Sydney.
The Toyota Parts Centre NSW (TPC) is located on a 6.4 hectare site close to a network of motorways and major arterial roads at Kemps Creek, New South Wales.
The TPC will house more than 128,000 parts and will ship approximately 27,000 parts daily.
It features more than 50,000m2 of total work area and class-leading safety and technology, including low-rack storage systems, which will provide a safer and more efficient workplace as employees will no longer need to work at heights to reach parts.
It will also include full separation of man and machine to build in safety, as well as the first use of a fleet of autonomous intelligent vehicles (AIV) to reduce manual carrying of parts.
Toyota Australia President and CEO Matthew Callachor said the project had a goal to be the best global Toyota warehouse in safety, efficiency and sustainability.
“Our commitment, as a mobility company, is to address the environmental challenges that we face, and to contribute to an ever-better society,” Mr Callachor said.
“Embracing green building solutions, cutting CO2 emissions and utilising alternative fuel sources go hand-in-hand with our production plans for new vehicles.
“We are already the leader in fuel-saving hybrid technology and we plan to introduce at least five new hybrid vehicles to our range by mid-2020, including the next generation RAV4 next year,” he said.

As part of Toyota Australia’s plans to reduce the TPC site to zero emissions by 2020, 2,200 solar panels were installed on the warehouse roof earlier this year.
So far, they’ve generated 556,000 kWh or enough energy to power 125 four-person households.
The power generated so far – before the building even became operational – has prevented more than 477 tonnes of greenhouse gases from entering the atmosphere.
Other environmental features built into the site include rainwater tanks for irrigation and toilets, as well as energy efficient LED sensor lights.
The building is cleverly positioned at a specific angle to ensure maximum natural cooling, effectively reducing air-conditioning costs.
For the first time outside of Japan, Toyota Australia will be trialling the use of hydrogen powered Toyota Material Handling fuel cell electric forklifts, with a long-term goal of being able to generate hydrogen on site in the future.
 

Coles, Woolworths join TWU safety drive, Aldi’s holding out

Coles has announced it will contract work to Toll, which will make road travel safer, said TWU National Secretary Michael Kaine.
The Coles announcement will see the retailer moving significant parts of its retail work to Toll in Queensland and Victoria. A final decision will be made regarding retail work in South Australia.  Toll has made commitments to hire drivers already carrying out this work for other companies, once skills and standards tests are met.
“What we need is a focus on the entire transport supply chain. This is why we want to see major companies taking the move Coles has done in choosing transport operators with the best practices, excellent safety standards and fair working conditions for their transport needs. This will ensure quality jobs in transport and safer roads,” said Mr Kaine.
In May Coles signed an agreement with the TWU to make its transport supply chains safer and to ensure safety and fairness in its on-demand economy work.
Trucking is Australia’s deadliest industry with a recent Monash University study highlighting the health and safety hazards for truck drivers. The study states truck drivers are 13 times more likely to die at work than any other profession, Mr Kaine said.
A report by the National Transport Commission said practices by the retail industry affecting road transport “can play a direct and significant role in causing hazardous practices”. It adds: “There is solid survey evidence linking payment levels and systems to crashes, speeding, driving while fatigued, and drug use”.
The TWU has also signed a charter with Woolworths that allows for supply chain auditing and plans to improve safety.
“Aldi continues to refuse to acknowledge its role in making our roads safer and has launched a federal court case to stop truck drivers and the TWU from protesting and speaking out about rates and safety in its supply chain,” Mr Kaine said. “Hearings in the case are set for April.”

Is freight transport ready for stricter CO2 targets?

One of the world’s largest logistics service providers and operator of Europe’s largest land transport network, DB Schenker, has committed itself to stricter CO2 reduction targets for commercial vehicles over 7.5 tonnes.
“I believe that more can be done and more must be done,” said DB Schenker CEO Jochen Thewes, on the occasion of Deutsche Bahn’s ‘Green November’ initiative. “To encourage the forthcoming structural transformation in the automotive industry and the availability of alternative drive technologies in freight transport as well, I consider the ambitious CO2 reduction targets for commercial vehicles of 20% by 2025 and 35% by 2030 to be absolutely feasible.
Having joined the global climate initiative EV100, DB Schenker recently decided to gradually convert its own fleet of distribution vehicles to electromobility. The objective is to retrofit all vehicles up to 3.5 tonnes with electric drives or fuel cells by 2030. Half of all vehicles weighing between 3.5 and 7.5 tonnes will also be electrically powered by then. Even today, DB Schenker already operates electric transport vehicles in Austria, Italy and Norway as well as electric cargo bikes in a dozen European cities.
Action is therefore required in particular with regard to trucks weighing over 7.5 tonnes: “Everyone must participate, including and especially the manufacturers. We need to make the long overdue technological leap in the imminent structural transformation in the automotive industry,” Mr Thewes said.
In addition, a pilot project in Germany together with MAN and Fresenius University is currently testing the efficiency of digitally controlled truck convoys, also known as platooning. Together with the Swedish start-up Einride, the world’s first electric and fully autonomous truck was recently put into commercial operation.
On 14 November the EU Parliament will vote on CO2 targets for freight transport. The decision will be based on a proposal by the European Commission to reduce CO2 emissions by 15 per cent by 2025 and 30 per cent by 2030. Earlier this year DB Schenker and other companies already advocated more ambitious CO2 targets for commercial vehicles of -20 per cent by 2025 and -35 per cent by 2030.

The Toughbook that’s a handheld, for logistics users

Panasonic has launched its next-generation Toughbook FZ-T1, a handheld device, a slimline, rugged model designed for mobile workers seeking an all-in-one device.
Panasonic says the 5” Android device “brings together the best of handheld and smartphone functionality into a single design, to suit the mobile needs of industries such as retail and hospitality, emergency services, manufacturing, and transport and logistics.”
Product marketing manager for Toughbook at Panasonic Australia Clare Hose said: “The Toughbook FZ-T1 is an important addition to our rugged handheld portfolio. Our customers are seeking a practical, rugged solution with a sleeker finish, which can still withstand difficult conditions – and that is exactly what we have delivered.
“As Panasonic has done for 100 years as a company and for more than two decades with our Toughbook range, we evolve and innovate to meet the changing needs of our users.
“The business need for rugged devices is evolving from the traditional environmental concerns of withstanding drops and water and dust protection, to features such as the type of viewing screen, battery life and power management, data security and communication capabilities.”
More customers are recognising that a rugged device is not the same as a regular handheld device. Consumer devices have components that are not designed to withstand continuous use in difficult conditions, and are liable to break down from shock, dust, moisture, heat and cold.
According to Panasonic, research shows that for standard handheld devices, the average cost of downtime per incident (including lost productivity, breakages and IT support to fix products or replace data) is upwards of AUD $3,000.
With its voice and data capabilities, integrated barcode scanner and wide-range of functionality and accessories, the Toughbook FZ-T1’s balance of mobility and durability is designed to improve workforce productivity and the ease and efficiency of business operations across Australia.
Panasonic also plans to release the Toughbook FZ-L1, a lightweight, rugged Android tablet designed for edge computing and customer-facing mobile workers. The 7” display model is available with voice and data capability for both inside and field-based workers.

Toll opens high-tech control room in Melbourne

The Toll Group has unveiled its first-ever Australian control room in Melbourne that the company says will enable improved safety and more efficient deliveries throughout the country.
Operating 24 hours a day, seven days a week, 365 days a year, the control room is the new nerve centre for Toll’s national road network, responsible for monitoring fleet location, delivery times, engine performance, driver fatigue and distractions, speed events, and incident analysis – all in real time.
Toll president of group operational services, Peter Stokes said the control room puts Toll at the forefront of transport technology.
“The new Toll Control Room is a major milestone for our company and the businesses we support throughout the country,” Mr Stokes said.
“Using data and digital technologies, the control room allows the Toll team to view and respond to any safety or operational issue across the country.
“Our team now has the very latest technology at their fingertips, enabling them to safely monitor and move our fleet across our national network like never before, 24 hours a day, seven days a week.
“The new centre is an investment in the future of our transport network and will ensure Toll continues to deliver strong results for safety and on-time deliveries.”
The control room features a massive video wall with a 9.5 metre interactive touch LED display screen – the largest in Australia and one of the largest of its kind in the world. Smart software integrates data from multiple sources including Toll’s in-truck telematics, which is then displayed and interacted with at the screen.
The new control room comes as Toll gears up ahead of the busy peak holiday season, where the number of linehaul movements is expected to surge by up to 40%.
The control room is staffed by 24 specialist analysts, planners and operational personnel.
Toll also announced that it will partner with the Australian Government under a new telematics data sharing project that aims to improve road safety and infrastructure planning.
Among the technical features of the control room are:

  • The first Australia-wide control room for Toll.
  • Comprehensive monitoring of biometric eye-tracking technology that detects driver distractions and potential fatigue.
  • Connection to GPS-enabled telematics to track truck location, and monitor driving hours to help manage fatigue.
  • Oversees telematic systems to improve truck and operator performance to reduce fuel usage and carbon emissions.
  • Remotely monitors road speed data in real time allowing intervention if necessary.
  • LED interactive display technology for enhanced operator collaboration.

The control room is part of Toll’s broader eight-year, $1.6 billion investment in new fleet and equipment.

Steam Australia: fascinating reading for all in transport

What do Agatha Christie, Arthur Conan Doyle, Rudyard Kipling and Mark Twain have in common? They all rode Australia’s steam train network in its heyday—and a new book explores its rich history. In Steam Australia: Locomotives that Galvanised the Nation (NLA Publishing, $39.99), author and former deputy prime minister, Tim Fischer, provides a captivating insight into Australia’s locomotive history, illustrated with over 300 images from the National Library of Australia, many of which have never been seen in print before.
Much more than just a listed history, Mr Fischer offers a compelling account of the great tapestry of transport weaved by the steam locomotive in this country. It details how the nation was galvanised by the economic growth steam trains delivered, and shares the stories behind famous named express trains such as Puffing Billy, Robert Gordon Menzies and The Ghan. It also includes a number of fascinating stories such as Albury’s ‘break of gauge’ platform, the Amiens branch line, the ‘garnishee’ order made against the Spirit of Progress, as well as those of important characters such as C.Y. O’Connor and John Whitton.
Deeply visual and well researched, Steam Australia provides a fascinating insight into locomotives and their important part in shaping Australian history.
The author
Tim Fischer entered state parliament in 1971, switched to federal parliament in 1984, and became Nationals leader in 1990 and deputy prime minister in 1996. He was appointed ambassador to the Holy See in 2008, and is now a successful book author. Since travelling to boarding school by steam and diesel trains five decades ago, Tim has maintained a deep interest in transport issues, serving as the transport officer of 1RAR and on many parliamentary committees relating to rail and general transport issues. More recently, he was on the board of FreightLink and also leads rail tours in Australia, Europe, Russia and South Africa.
The book
Steam Australia is a beautifully presented book, just as you would expect from the National Library of Australia. Whether you prefer to read from cover to cover or open it randomly and browse through it, you are guaranteed to be entertained by the thoroughly researched, authoritatively yet passionately written words and the many, many fascinating historic photographs.
Buy it as a gift or spoil yourself, it is a great book for anyone with the slightest interest in transport. Available at all good bookstores and online at NLA Publishing – https://bookshop.nla.gov.au/book/steam-australia-locomotives-that-galvanised-the-nation.do.

Swinburne, CCA get together to deliver innovative SC course

John Hopkins and Carly Cummings.

Swinburne has partnered with international beverage manufacturer and distributor Coca-Cola Amatil, to co-design and co-deliver Swinburne’s Master of Supply Chain Innovation.
The unique postgraduate course commenced in 2018 and is delivered through Swinburne’s Australian Graduate School of Entrepreneurship (AGSE).
Throughout 2018, the AGSE has continued to form collaborative partnerships with industry that will prepare graduates for the future of supply chain management.
This partnership builds on the AGSE’s goal of delivering courses that equip students with a sound understanding of the latest industry skills, knowledge and technologies.
Students will work with Coca-Cola Amatil on the Innovative Supply Chain Technologies applied project unit, gaining valuable industry insights from supply chain experts.
They will be tasked with investigating what the company’s operations will look like in the future as new and emerging technologies disrupt the supply chain industry.
Director of the Master of Supply Chain Innovation Dr John Hopkins said partnering with Coca-Cola Amatil places students in the unique position of graduating with experience in a multinational distribution company.
“We are very excited to be working with Coca-Cola Amatil and see this collaboration as a wonderful opportunity for our students to hear directly from industry experts, while learning about contemporary supply chain technologies out in the field.”
Coca-Cola Amatil general manager, logistics in operations, Amanda Cech said the pace of change in technology, coupled with consumer expectations for speedy access to products and services, is having a direct impact on supply chain management.
“We are delighted to partner with Swinburne and offer our real-world, specialist expertise to the future leaders in supply chain management and innovation,” Ms Cech said.

Melbourne’s VICT declared dangerous by the ITF

The Victorian International Container Terminal (VICT) at Melbourne’s Webb Dock has been declared a Port of Convenience (PoC) by the International Transport Workers’ Federation (ITF) at its 44th Congress in Singapore.
ITF president Paddy Crumlin said unions believe a fatal accident could be imminent at VICT, with a number of serious safety-related incidents reported by the workforce recently.
“It is a big step to declare a Port of Convenience but VICT continues to ignore the entirely justified concerns of its workforce over their safety and shift arrangements,” said Mr Crumlin, who is also the national secretary of the Maritime Union of Australia.
The ITF-affiliated MUA has been campaigning against the Philippine-based multinational port operator ICTSI over the significant undercutting of rates, conditions and industry standards on the Australian waterfront, the shifting of automated port jobs to the Philippines, and poor safety standards at the VICT terminal.
VICT is also currently facing legal action over the unlawful sacking of a union delegate and paying wages that undercut the legal minimum wages under the industry award.
“All maritime affiliates are now considering what lawful action may be required to give effect to the PoC campaign,” added Mr Crumlin.
The ITF has uncovered serious exploitation across ICTSI’s global terminals with the company fast becoming one of the most controversial in the maritime industry.
“Globally, ICTSI’s workers are underpaid and overworked, harassed and coerced, and union members often face intimidation in retaliation for raising workplace issues,” Mr Crumlin said.
“ICTSI has tried to bring its anti-worker business model, that they have run out all over the world, to Australia and we won’t tolerate it.”
MUA deputy national secretary Will Tracey said two workers at the VICT terminal were recently hospitalised, and the entire workforce is now fearing more serious accidents following the recent introduction of dramatically increased working hours.
“This workplace is unsafe and threatens the standards that union activists over generations have built up. The transferring of automated jobs offshore is something the MUA will fight with all our resources and all the resources of the Australian trade union movement,” Mr Tracey said.
“Hopefully, this step can ramp up pressure on the company to intervene immediately before a worker is killed or seriously injured,” Mr Tracey added.

Blockchain works in supply chains: report

A worldwide analysis of leading organisations implementing blockchain demonstrates the technology’s potential to transform supply chains across the globe.
A new report by the Capgemini Research Institute has revealed that blockchain could become ubiquitous by 2025, entering mainstream business and underpinning supply chains worldwide. Through investment and partnerships, the distributed ledger technology will dominate manufacturing as well as consumer products and retail industries, ushering in a new era of transparency and trust.
The report, Does blockchain hold the key to a new age of supply chain transparency and trust?, provides a comprehensive overview into the businesses and geographies that are ramping up their blockchain readiness, and predicts that blockchain will enter mainstream use in supply chains by 2025. Currently just 3% of organisations that are deploying blockchain do so at scale and 10% have a pilot in place, with 87% of respondents reporting to be in the early stages of experimentation with blockchain.
The UK (22%) and France (17%) currently lead the way with at-scale and pilot implementation of blockchain in Europe, while the USA (18%) is a front-runner in terms of funding blockchain initiatives. These ‘pacesetters’ are optimistic that blockchain will deliver on its potential, with over 60% believing that blockchain is already transforming the way they collaborate with their partners.
The study also found that cost saving (89%), enhanced traceability (81%) and enhanced transparency (79%) are the top three drivers behind current investments in blockchain. Furthermore, blockchain enables information to be delivered securely, faster and more transparently. The technology can be applied to critical supply chain functions, from tracking production to monitoring food chains and ensuring regulatory compliance. Enthused by the results they are seeing, the pacesetters identified in the study are set to grow their blockchain investment by 30% in the next three years.
On the downside
Despite the optimism surrounding blockchain deployments, concerns remain around establishing a clear return-on-investment, and interoperability between partners in a supply chain. The majority (92%) of pacesetters point to establishing ROI as the greatest challenge to adoption and 80% cite interoperability with legacy systems as a major operational challenge. Additionally, 82% point to the security of transactions as inhibiting partner adoption of their blockchain applications, undermining blockchain’s status as a secure technology.
Chief technology officer for financial services at Capgemini Sudhir Pai said: “There are some really exciting use cases in the marketplace that are showing the benefits of blockchain for improving the supply chain, but blockchain is not a silver bullet for an organisation’s supply chain challenges. Blockchain’s ROI has not yet been quantified, and business models and processes will need to be redesigned for its adoption. Effective partnerships are needed across the supply chain to build an ecosystem-based blockchain strategy, integrated with broader technology deployments, to ensure that it can realise its potential.”
In a previous report conducted earlier this year with Swinburne University of Technology in Australia, Capgemini found that experimentation in blockchain will peak in 2020 as organisations explore proofs of concept and branch out from Fintechs. According to the report, blockchain transformation will mature in 2025 as organisations undertake enterprise transformation and integration, establishing policies for privacy and data management.
Deputy Vice Chancellor (Research and Development) of Swinburne University of Technology Professor Aleks Subic said: “Organisations trust blockchain technology to solve key issues and create new business opportunities, and it lends credibility to the digital ecosystem across the supply chain. We believe that blockchain technology will play an integral role in the digital transformation of supply chain channels for a wide range of industries in the near future.”
Despite the barriers facing blockchain today, organisations are trying to drive wider adoption now while the technology is in its early stage. One example is the Mobility Open Blockchain Initiative (MOBI), a consortium comprised of a group of auto and tech companies focused on getting carmakers to assign digital identities to vehicles so that cars and systems can transact with each other.
Current industry use cases
Capgemini Research Institute’s report identified 24 use cases for blockchain, ranging from trading carbon credits, to managing supplier contracts and preventing counterfeit products. Capgemini applied these use cases to retail, manufacturing and consumer products, finding that blockchain can be and is being used for tracing the production, provenance and inventory of contracts, products and services. The report highlights that consumer product organisations are notably focused on tracing and identifying products, with Nestlé, Unilever and Tyson Foods implementing blockchain trials. Retailers are focused on digital marketplaces and preventing counterfeits, with the likes of Starbucks investing in blockchain trials. More critically, blockchain can safeguard food supplies, tracing food from farm to fork, to head off contamination or product recalls.
A copy of the report can be downloaded here.
 

$55m Hammond Business Park completed

Vaughan Constructions has completed the $55 million, 81,000sqm Hammond Business Park at Dandenong South with a deal worth more than $8.5 million to construct a new purpose-built facility for promotional products supplier Dex Collections.
The completion of the estate came with a flurry of design-and-construct deals negotiated by Vaughans over the last six months on the back of a critical shortage of industrial land and buildings in the south-east industrial market that has driven a significant escalation in land values.
Vaughan’s development manager in Victoria Chris Telley said the south-eastern market was experiencing the greatest lack of quality industrial buildings in a decade, a shortage that had been exacerbated by a lack of available land.
“As a stronger Victorian economy moves into a higher gear, driving manufacturing and logistics industries, and as residential demand continues to grow and take industrial land, we face even greater shortages – particularly around the key transport nodes and especially along EastLink, and that’s going to mean ongoing upward pressure on land values,’’ Mr Telley said.
He said Dex Collections would take advantage of the first rate road transport links that the estate offered with quick access to Eastlink.
“The location, together with the modern warehousing facility, should deliver significantly enhanced operating performance across the business,’’ Mr Telley said.
The purpose-built facility will comprise 4,905 square metres of office, showroom and warehouse space, concrete hard stand, a loading yard and 74 car spaces on a 13,031 square metre site on the corner of Hammond Road and Rodeo Drive.
 

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