ALC releases final submission for freight strategy Inquiry

The Australian Logistics Council (ALC) has released its final submission to the Inquiry into National Freight and Supply Chain Priorities: Freight Doesn’t Vote.
The submission makes 41 recommendations relating to all transport modes operating in the Australian freight logistics sector, as well as whole-of-industry issues.
“[The] ALC has long advocated for a National Freight and Supply Chain Strategy,” said Michael Kilgariff, Managing Director, ALC. “We are proud to release a comprehensive submission that clearly reflects industry’s priorities and offers practical suggestions for policy reform.
“The content of Freight Doesn’t Vote has been informed by an extensive process of industry engagement – including ALC Forum 2017 in March, dialogue with the Department of Infrastructure and Regional Development, and extensive consultations with members and the broader industry.
“The submission calls on the Commonwealth Government to play a greater role in protecting against urban encroachment and preserving critical freight transport corridors – a position that has also been endorsed by Infrastructure Australia (IA).
“It recommends reviewing a number of regulatory practices that inhibit the efficient movement of freight, such as curfews and bans on freight vehicles. It also identifies opportunities for the Federal Government to incentivise good planning practices and encourage the take-up of new technologies that can deliver better outcomes.
“The submission does not shy away from recommending initiatives that may be politically challenging – particularly around greater Commonwealth involvement in planning, as well as road pricing and investment reform.
“However, the reality is that Australia’s economy is being transformed by population growth, by technological change and by the changing behaviour of ever-more discerning and empowered consumers. Our supply chains must be equipped to deal with that reality.”
The full submission can be viewed on the ALC’s website.

Input sought on Australia’s future supply chain

Minister for Infrastructure and Transport Darren Chester has called for submissions on a discussion paper for the Inquiry into National Freight and Supply Chain Priorities.
“The Australian Government has announced a record $75 billion infrastructure investment programme, which comprises a range of freight initiatives including the Melbourne to Brisbane Inland Rail and the Western Sydney Airport,” Chester said.
“Feedback on the discussion paper will help the inquiry examine how our investment in the freight network can boost the nation’s prosperity and meet community expectations for safety, security and environmental amenity.
“It will also further our understanding of what challenges and opportunities lie ahead, and how we can take advantage of them.
Chester noted that the discussion paper offers an opportunity for key freight stakeholders such as carriers, shippers, forwarders, primary producers, land developers and consumers to have their voices heard.
“Everybody is part of the national supply chain, whether you are a consumer, business owner, producer, farmer or freight operator,” he added.
Submissions close on 28 July 2017. For more details on how to make a submission, visit the infrastructure.gov website.
The Australian Logistics Council (ALC) has welcomed the release of the Discussion Paper.
“[The] ALC believes there is merit in engaging in a wide-ranging public debate involving government, industry and the community to ensure road funding reform proposals improve supply chain efficiency against the backdrop of an increasing national freight task,” said Michael Kilgariff, Managing Director, ALC.
“[The] ALC supports a critical analysis of the current PAYGO formula for road pricing, which is an inefficient and ultimately unsustainable approach to road pricing. As the 2015 Harper Review stated, ‘roads are the least reformed of all infrastructure sectors’, and the Discussion Paper makes it clear the Federal Government is prepared to address this problem.
“As ALC has consistently said, a reform of this nature will only succeed if the freight logistics industry is actively involved in the development of the new road pricing system. It is therefore pleasing that the Government is seeking industry comment on the options put forward in the Discussion Paper.”

National Heavy Vehicle Regulator forum kicks off in Brisbane

A new round of heavy vehicle Chain of Responsibility information sessions kicked off in Brisbane on Thursday, in preparation for the new laws set to come into force in 2018.
Darren Chester, Federal Transport and Infrastructure Minister, said the National Heavy Vehicle Regulator Forum would assist businesses in the heavy vehicle supply chain to understand their role in heavy vehicle safety.
“More than 160 companies will receive information about the Chain of Responsibility reforms which are currently being rolled out nationally,” Chester said. “There were 213 deaths from 191 fatal crashes involving heavy trucks or buses in 2016. I am determined to see that number continue to fall and make heavy vehicle safety everyone’s business.
“The NHVR information sessions will complement heavy vehicle and national workplace safety laws, and make it easier for duty holders to understand and assess their risks, and know whether they are complying with the law.
“Through the replacement of existing prescriptive obligations, the whole transport industry can benefit from a reduction of red tape and better apply risk management processes to focus on safety outcomes.”
Chester said the Federal Government would support the transition to the new laws with an $800,000 information campaign by the NHVR, including forums across Australia.
“The Forum will support the changes which passed through Queensland Parliament in December last year to improve safety outcomes and provide a strong and more stable supply chain,” said Queensland Main Roads Minister Mark Bailey.
“Whether you are a consignor, scheduler, CEO or board member all parties in the supply chain will need to be more proactive in managing risks to ensure safe transport operations.”
NHVR CEO Sal Petroccitto said the NHVR would provide information to support the heavy vehicle industry and the heavy vehicle supply chain through these changes.
“Earlier this year we released our guidelines for Industry Codes of Practice, and a series of Chain of Responsibility fact sheets and podcasts as part of a national effort to boost safety for all road users,” he said. “The new reforms come into effect in mid 2018, giving all businesses across the heavy vehicle supply chain time to prepare for the changes.”

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