Airbus trials drone delivery to ships

Airbus has begun shore-to-ship trials in Singapore with its Skyways parcel delivery drone.
This marks the first time drone technology has been deployed in real port conditions to deliver a variety of small, time-critical maritime essentials to working vessels at anchorage.
The trials are being undertaken in conjunction with partner Wilhelmsen Ships Services,.
During the trials, Airbus’ Skyways drone will lift off from the pier with a payload capability of up to 4 kg, and navigate autonomously along pre-determined ‘aerial corridors’ to vessels as far as 3 km from the coast.
“We are thrilled to launch the first trial of its kind in the maritime world. Today’s accomplishment is a culmination of months of intense preparation by our dedicated team, and the strong collaboration with our partner, as we pursue a new terrain in the maritime industry,” A Leo Jeoh, Airbus’ Skyways lead said.
“We are also happy to be taking a step forward for Airbus’ urban air mobility endeavour, as we continue to explore and seek better understanding of what it takes to fly safe and reliable autonomous flying vehicles safely,” he added.
“The now proven, seamless operation of drone deliveries from shore to ship, in one of the world’s busiest ports proves the hard work, investment and faith we, and indeed our partners, placed in the Agency by Air project over the past two years was not misplaced,” Marius Johansen, Vice President Commercial, Ships Agency at Wilhelmsen Ships Services said.
“Delivery of essential spares, medical supplies and cash to master via launch boat, is an established part of our portfolio of husbandry services, which we provide day in and day out, in ports all over the world. Modern technology such as the unmanned aircraft systems, are just a new tool, albeit a very cool one, with which we can push our industry ever forward and improve how we serve our customers,” he added.

LINX Cargo Care Group rolls out VR safety training

LINX Cargo Care Group (LINX CCG) has created a Virtual Reality (VR) safety training platform in collaboration with Curiious and Samsung Electronics Australia which is the first of its kind in Australia’s supply chain and logistics industry.

The Gear VR training platform was designed to create an immersive VR experience to enhance LINX CCG’s safety training delivery and assessment. LINX CCG partnered with communication and technology company Curiious to conceptualise and build the immersive VR experience.

LINX CCG is committed to sending its 4,000 people home safely every day, across more than 70 sites in Australia and New Zealand.

Anthony Jones, LINX Cargo Care Group CEO, is passionate about safety. His dispersed and diverse workforce operate 24/7 in hazardous environments with large machinery. The key to improving safety is to create a compelling, simulated experience that cuts through and has an impact.

“Virtual reality training will enable us to immerse all our people in diverse situations and expose them to critical risks in our hazardous work environment,” he said.

This commitment to standardise is echoed by Peter Seaman, LINX CCG Executive General Manager Health, Safety and Environment.

“The Gear VR platform enables us to deliver consistent safety training across all levels of the organisation. Often some of the messages are lost in translation in safety training and delivered in different ways, whereas this Gear VR platform minimises room for miscommunication,” Peter said.

Anthony believes VR immersion is really powerful.

“To put people into different situations where they have the chance to see how it would play out and to immerse them in a scenario, showing them real dangers and consequences, is invaluable,” he said.

Michelle Schuberg, Curiious General Manager, also believes in the benefits the immersive Gear VR technology will bring to enhancing LINX CCG’s approach to safety.

“For LINX CCG, the platform’s end goal is to help deliver their ‘home safely every day’ promise,” said Michelle.

World’s first tunnel for large ships

The Norwegian government has announced plans to build the world’s first tunnel for large ships, a project aimed at helping navigate a dangerous section of the south-western coast.

On Friday, the government unveiled the 10-year transport plan, announcing it would provide one billion kroner ($A166 million) for the construction of the Stad maritime tunnel.

The passageway will be 1.7 km long, and carved into a piece of the peninsula’s mountainside, SMH reported.

"The project will help increase safety and navigability" in the region, the government said


With an estimated const of 1.6 billion kroner, construction will begin in 2018 and take four years.

"It will be the first tunnel in the world that can be used by big boats like cargo ships or the Coastal Express," the famed tourist ship that cruises along the Norwegian coast, said Ottar Nygaard, mayor of the small town of Selje and the head of the project.

According to a study by the specialised company Nordvest Fjordservice, the waters of the Stad peninsula have seen 46 accidents and near-accidents and 33 deaths since the end of World War II.

Image: SMH

Man with serious burns rescued from ship

A man suffering burns to 12% of his arms, legs and face was airlifted from a bulk carrier in Gladstone Harbour on Monday.

Authorities say the man, believed to be of Filipino decent, may have been doused with hot engine oil, the Gladstone Observer reported.

The 50-year old-man was treated on board before being loaded onto the rescue helicopter and transported to Rockhampton Base Hospital for further treatment.

The ship, Bulk India, a 17,8000 ton bulk carrier, was sitting in Gladstone Harbour waiting to load when the accident happened.

The safety of international seafarers has been a concern for authorities in past months.

Following the death of a seafarer in Newcastle, ships visiting the port were subjected to safety inspections late last year.

Dedicating the inquiry to Hector Collado, a 55 year old who died on the Sage Sagittarius, national coordinator Dean Summers said flag of convenience ships often escaped regulations protecting seafarer’ safety rights, leaving them at risk, the Newcastle Herald reported.

‘‘We are boarding ships to protect the welfare, safety and dignity of international seafarers and we will be reporting to Australian authorities any abuse of rights or safety issues,’’ Summers said.

‘We’re going to try and inspect every ship in the port this week and take a sounding of the conditions for seafarers.’’

Inspections start on ship conditions in Newcastle

Following the death of a seafarer in Newcastle, ships visiting the port this week will be inspected to ensure their safety.

International Transport Workers Federation Inspectors boarded a coal vessel at Kooragang Island yesterday, launching the week-long campaign to investigate ships flying “flags of convenience.”

Dedicating the inquiry to Hector Collado, a 55 year old who died on the Sage Sagittarius, national coordinator Dean Summers said flag of convenience ships often escaped regulations protecting seafarer’ safety rights, leaving them at risk, the Newcastle Herald reported.

‘‘We are boarding ships to protect the welfare, safety and dignity of international seafarers and we will be reporting to Australian authorities any abuse of rights or safety issues,’’ Summers said.

‘We’re going to try and inspect every ship in the port this week and take a sounding of the conditions for seafarers.’’

Newcastle Port Corporation said it would work closely with the body to help aid inspections and deal with any breaches found.

‘I would like to think Newcastle is viewed as a safe and welcoming port for seafarers,’’ chief executive Gary Webb said.

‘‘We look forward to providing any assistance we may in addressing any issues that are found.’’

Image: SMH

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