Safer roads require national leadership: ALC

The Australian Logistics Council (ALC) has fully endorsed the six-point national heavy vehicle safety plan Michael Byrne, Managing Director of Toll Group, proposed in his recent letter to Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull.
“The proposals contained in the plan are entirely consistent with longstanding ALC policy, and offer a clear pathway to delivering improved road safety, not only for heavy vehicles, but for all road users,” said Michael Kilgariff, Managing Director, ALC.
“As an industry leader on freight and supply chain policy issues, ALC has continually emphasised that our supply chains do not stop at state borders. Accordingly, regulations which govern heavy vehicles and freight movement need to be nationally consistent, to promote supply chain efficiency and safety, and to provide certainty for industry.”
Kilgariff called for the Federal Government to immediately pursue discussions with the governments of Western Australia and the Northern Territory to encourage them to sign up to the Heavy Vehicle National Law (HVNL). “In a modern national economy, it is not feasible to have inconsistent rules in different states pertaining to the definition of a heavy vehicle, speed limits and regulation of driver’s working hours and mandatory rest times,” he said.
“The Federal Government should also immediately pursue a national operator licensing system, which ALC strongly supports as essential to improving road safety and making certain the nation’s heavy vehicle fleet is operated by competent professionals who understand their safety obligations.”
Kilgariff also welcomed Byrne’s call for mandatory use of telematics. “Industry has consistently told governments that mandating the use of telematics in heavy vehicles is central to driving better safety outcomes and saving lives on our roads,” he said. “Now is the time for decision-makers to heed that advice.”
The ALC’s 2018–19 Commonwealth Budget submission recommended that the Federal Government support measures that encourage the capture and use of technology and data, which is in line with Byrne’s own suggestions.
Kilgariff also praised Byrne’s proposal of discounted registration fees for transport operators that can demonstrate they are investing in telematics, as well as campaigns to improve driver awareness about sharing the road with heavy vehicles.
“Our industry stands ready to work with all governments to enhance heavy vehicle safety,” said Kilgariff. “They should take the opportunity to harness that goodwill and work with transport operators in the interests of saving lives and enhancing safety for all road users.”

Registration and fuel costs for trucks are increasing from 1 July 2012.

The top issues to tackle today to prepare for 2018

Todd Ewing
Ongoing fuel costs, driver safety and keeping tabs on a fleet of vehicles continue to present challenges for any transport business. As the year draws to a close, Fleetmatics has shared its top for predictions for what will best prepare fleet managers for 2018.

  1. Collecting and analysing data

Modern developments in technology such as telematics systems and fuel cards mean that tremendous amounts of data relating to driver and vehicle behaviour is available to transport managers. The next big challenge – or opportunity – is not only capturing the data from vehicle tracking technology, but truly understanding how to harness it and respond to data-driven insights, to make effective fleet management decisions, and drive business profitability.

  1. Reduce downtime

The ability to accurately record vehicle idling has been a challenge for fleet managers. Excessive idling wastes a significant amount of fuel and diminishes a fleet’s productivity. A driver might sit in the vehicle with the engine and air-conditioning running if they arrive early to a job, which means valuable fuel, and time, is wasted. Drivers practicing poor habits, such as speeding and harsh braking, are also burning fuel unnecessarily. A vehicle tracking solution enables fleet managers to make informed decisions based on driver performance. This information can help continuously improve efficiency. With the ability to track exactly when vehicles are arriving and departing from sites, fleet managers are able to identify areas of wasted time and where fuel dollars are being wasted on needless kilometres. This helps enable drivers to take the most efficient route to the job, saving time and reducing unnecessary costs.

  1. Rising fuel costs

 75 percent of Australian fleet businesses cite fuel reduction as their key priority, according to a new report commissioned by Fleetmatics. And the price of fuel is set to increase. Transport businesses require a solution to reduce fuel wastage. Fuel costs can get out of hand very quickly if not monitored effectively. Again looking at modern advancements in technology, companies with a fuel card expect their employees to only purchase fuel for the company vehicle. But this isn’t always the case. Employees may be filling up their personal car or a mate’s car with the company fuel card. This means the company is paying for the employee’s personal fuel. This is also the case if a driver uses a company vehicle to run person errands after hours. Not only does this waste fuel, it adds wear and tear to the company vehicle.
The key to overcoming fuel budget blowouts could be vehicle tracking, both today and in the future. Businesses with fuel card integration, which integrates fuel card usage data with a vehicle tracking system, can identify when the vehicle was not at the pump when its assigned fleet card was used. For example, a fuel purchased report provides transaction activity for each vehicle on demand without digging through your monthly fuel card bill. This report serves as a baseline for fuel usage improvements, which is essential for fleet managers trying to put a lid on fuel costs. They can use this data to pinpoint fuel-wasting driving behaviours and inefficient vehicles.

  1. Safety

Driving a truck has been identified as one of the most dangerous occupations in Australia, with one out of every three workplace deaths last year involving a transport worker. With risks this high, it’s clear that driver safety needs to be an ongoing priority for fleet managers – today and in five years’ time. They need to take advantage of the latest in technology and safety features. Keeping track of how vehicles are being driven is only half the battle when it comes to having a safe work environment. The most critical step is encouraging drivers to maintain a high calibre of driving style at all times. We’re seeing Australian organisations invest in vehicle tracking technology. Near real-time access to data on how individual drivers are behaving on the road provides visibility into who is driving too fast, braking harshly or taking corners too hard. The software sends configurable alerts back-to-base when safety thresholds are crossed. With the ability to take quick action, fleet managers can target repeat offenders to curb unsafe driving habits, before they lead to more serious incidents.
Todd Ewing is the director of product marketing at Fleetmatics.
 
 

NTC telematics review needs wider focus: ALC

The Australian Logistics Council (ALC) has called for the National Transport Commission (NTC) to consider the benefits of using telematics to improve multiple aspects of heavy vehicle safety, including the control of speeding compliance and advancing land transport market reform, for the review of regulatory telematics it is currently undertaking.
“ALC has a longstanding record of advocating for the mandatory use of telematics to enhance heavy vehicle safety,” said Michael Kilgariff, Managing Director, ALC.
“It is pleasing that the NTC has at last agreed to examine matters including industry adoption rates, barriers to adoption and the governance and legislative arrangements surrounding the use of telematics in heavy vehicles.”
Kilgariff noted that it is important that the parameters of the review are sufficiency broad so as not to impede active consideration of the benefits of telematics, both in terms of enhancing road safety and boosting national productivity.
“Industry has consistently told the NTC and other government bodies that mandatory use of telematics is essential to driving efficiency and safety improvements in the heavy vehicle sector,” he added.
“Discussion about making more effective use of telematics has been ongoing for a number of years, and during that time the technology available to industry has become both more reliable and more accessible, as the price of telematics equipment falls.
“ALC’s continuing discussions with industry participants regarding the National Freight and Supply Chain Strategy indicate that industry is continuing to embrace innovative technological solutions.
“This means it is now easier than ever to collect reliable data that can shape the development of a more efficient and safer freight transport network.”
 

Highlighting the industry’s view

With the Federal Government having announced the composition of the expert panel that will advise on the development of the National Freight and Supply Chain Strategy, the real work of shaping its content is now well and truly under way.
It’s not indulging in hyperbole to say that we have a once-in-a-generation opportunity to get this right. Australia’s rapidly growing population coupled with changing patterns of consumer behaviour – especially with the growth of e-Commerce – will impose significant additional demands on the freight and logistics sector.
Indeed, the National Transport Commission (NTC) estimates that Australia’s freight task will grow by some 26 per cent in the next decade alone. When you think of the capacity constraints that are already evident in some of our major cities, particularly growing traffic congestion, such forecasts can appear daunting.
Although it will require a significant degree of hard work on the part of the freight and logistics industry, I am nonetheless confident that we can come up with solutions that will allow us to meet this burgeoning demand.
We know that industry is willing to play an active role, and we know that the Federal Government’s agreement to develop a National Freight and Supply Chain Strategy shows decision-makers are willing to listen to industry’s advice.
Thus, our immediate challenge is to make certain the advice we provide is the right advice, which will help ensure the Strategy that emerges is the right one for our industry and the right one for the Australian economy.
I think there has been an encouraging start on this front.
At the beginning of March, the ALC held its annual Forum in Melbourne, and the entire focus of the event was discussing the content of the National Freight and Supply Chain Strategy.
Of course, we are not starting with a blank piece of paper. Many of the attendees at the Forum are leading figures within Australia’s freight and logistics industry, and throughout their many years of collective experience they have garnered insights and evidence that will prove invaluable in terms of getting policy settings right.
Although ALC Forum 2017 was the first industry-wide gathering since the Prime Minister’s announcement last November that the Government would develop the Strategy, the discussions revealed there is already a remarkable degree of consensus across the industry about what is required to make it effective. This is a strong basis from which to work.
To help synthesise the industry’s conversations to date, the ALC has produced a Working Paper that summarises the views of industry to date about the contents of the Strategy.
Some of the major themes addressed in that publication are as follows:
Urban encroachment issues
In the lead up to the 2016 Federal Election, the ALC prepared a document called Getting The Supply Chain Right, which highlighted the freight and logistics industry’s most pressing priorities for an incoming government.
One of those was urban encroachment, and the lack of buffer zones, land separation setbacks and design mitigation measures around sensitive use developments, which can significantly hamper the efficient operation of freight-related infrastructure.
At the time, the ALC noted that the national freight supply chain will be unable to support Australia’s growing demand if facilities and infrastructure continue to be prevented from realising their optimal capacity, due to restrictions imposed on their use or operating conditions.
This includes things like night curfews for airfreight and port facilities, restrictive speed limits and the banning of heavy vehicles from key routes that provide access to freight facilities.
These things are often pursued by governments in search of an electoral boost. However, their long-term impact is to simply build inefficiencies into the supply chain, which ultimately results in higher consumer prices.
As industry ‘insiders’, we understand that there is a symbiotic relationship between good outcomes for freight efficiency and good outcomes for the community.
The problem lies in the fact that this is vastly underappreciated by the public at large, and even at times by decision-makers within government.
This is how we end up with poor planning outcomes, such as the failure to preserve freight corridors, and insufficient consideration of freight operations when pursuing ‘urban infill’ objectives surrounding new residential developments.
The freight and logistics industry needs to better ‘sell’ the fact that corridor preservation equates to improved safety, liveability and efficiency outcomes.
Technology issues
There was a broad consensus among participants at the Forum that not enough is being done to make use of data, both in terms of improving safety and efficiency across the supply chain, and also when it comes to effectively planning the nation’s freight infrastructure.
Of course, the top priority must be safety in the supply chain. Regrettably, Australia’s approach to safety in the trucking industry is lagging significantly behind that of other comparable nations. In particular, several participants at the Forum noted that Australia’s trucking industry is making insufficient use of telematics when it comes to making business decisions.
The ALC will continue to pursue a national telematics law, permitting the use of data about vehicle performance, equipment and driver behaviour that can be used to enhance road safety, improve efficiency within the logistics industry and identify problems with driver behaviour.
Technology also offers a potential way to overcome the impact of ever-more restrictive planning and vehicular access policies when it comes to CBD freight delivery. One detailed presentation discussed using urban consolidation/distribution stations. These can provide for multi-modal routing systems using bicycles, walkers and electronic vans to facilitate freight delivery.
It is far more efficient than using large vehicles to deliver small loads – especially given that an increasing number of large-scale residential developments do not incorporate delivery zones or provide access facilities for freight vehicles.
Rail issues
There is very strong support within the industry for construction of the Inland Rail, at last providing a port-to-port rail link from Melbourne to Brisbane. This project has had a long gestation, but with the increasing demand for freight resulting from free trade agreements and the growth of e-Commerce, encouraging more freight onto rail is vital.
Constructing the Inland Rail will help to cut freight transport times, reduce road congestion and promote cheaper consumer prices. There are also considerable economic benefits for regional communities along the route.
However, there are also opportunities elsewhere in the sector to make greater use of short-haul rail. This includes pursing projects like the duplication of the rail line at Port Botany, which will help achieve NSW Ports’ target of moving three million Twenty-foot Equivalent Units (TEU) by rail by the year 2045.
Pursuing a rail connection between the Port of Melbourne and three of Victoria’s inland ports will also be important in promoting supply greater supply chain efficiency and addressing road congestion.
This issue is especially important in the context of Asia’s rapidly expanding middle class, whose appetite for the type of high-quality agricultural goods Australia produces will be a source of growing demand on our freight and export infrastructure. We must be mindful not to cede our competitive edge in this area by failing to have a supply chain that operates safely and efficiently from paddock to port.
The next steps
The ALC believes that a dynamic Strategy requires a dynamic consultation process to guide its development, and accordingly the ALC will be continuing to engage closely with industry over the coming weeks and months to make sure we get the right outcomes.
However, from the conversation thus far, it’s already apparent that there are some clear expectations from industry.
Existing freight infrastructure needs to be made to operate efficiently, through making sure planning instruments not only identify and preserve the industrial lands to provide the jobs and logistics facilities of the future, but also ensure new residential developments do not encroach on infrastructure and prevent its effective utilisation.
It will also be necessary to establish some form of mandatory system of data collection that will allow better decision making and improved outcomes in safety, planning and investment decisions, all of which will help boost productivity.
We will need to move towards hypothecation of levies, fees, taxes and charges raised for the purpose of developing an identified piece of infrastructure – so that money raised is invested properly and not put back into consolidated revenue.
The construction of Inland Rail must continue to be treated as a priority, ensuring rail as a modality has a clear place in moving freight in the Australian supply chain.
Great Commonwealth leadership needs to promote supply chain safety and efficiency – this includes helping the public at large understand the importance of supply chain efficiency, as well as incentivising state jurisdictions to consider freight needs in their planning instruments by making Commonwealth funding support subject to conditions such as having corridor preservation strategies in place.
Finally, the establishment of a specific Federal Department of Planning and Infrastructure will allow the Commonwealth’s expertise in these areas (including the development of funding mechanisms) to be concentrated and properly able to be used as resource, by industry and by other jurisdictions.

How will transport succeed in a ‘higher expectation’ future?

What will transport look like in the future? Will people and governments ever accept driverless B-doubles careering through city streets? Will we see flying delivery vans? Near-instant drone deliveries, or delivery by particle beam, Star Trek- style?
Change won’t be smooth. Driverless trucks might be available, but the regulators will be well behind. All of these innovations raise serious questions about safety and security, which will become political as the regulators and the public weigh up the pros and cons.
Rather than focus too heavily on what might be coming, we need to step back and consider the principles which will drive future developments.
The big picture tells us transport is often a source of great angst in the supply chain, as it’s one of business’s greatest costs. It also tells us that both B2B and B2C customers are becoming more savvy, and expecting more.
Our ability to succeed in this ‘higher expectation’ future will come down to applying timeless principles of successful delivery transport: the ability to offer personalised service, efficiently.
We need to continually ask: are we able to meet or even surpass the consumer’s expectations? Already, supply chain innovation from global behemoths such as Amazon is having a knock-on effect across many industries. We all need to put ourselves in the mindset of the ‘want-it-now’ shopper.
Consumers see innovations like next-day or half-day delivery, or parcel delivery tracking, and it becomes a standard expectation. Can same-day delivery become same-hour delivery? If consumers come to expect it, we will need to figure it out.
A key principle is that the wrong transport option fundamentally affects a product’s cost viability to market and the customer experience, both of which determine future sales. This applies to driverless vehicles, drones or standard delivery methods. If driverless trucks require a babysitter driver for safety reasons there may be some efficiency gains regarding fewer accidents and better fuel efficiency, but will there be big savings? How do we measure the performance? No matter what the method, you need a mentality to continually question and analyse to get results.
Unfortunately, many organisations fall over at the first step – not fully understanding their transport costs since many variables need to be accounted for. While technological tools are available, the knowledge to use these tools to their potential is often missing. Without this crucial starting point, it’s difficult to keep tabs on how your transport costs can be reined in and performance improved.
Greater efficiency and responsiveness is key, which means greater flexibility across the supply chain is needed. Technology plays a key role – in transport we are seeing supply chains across the board benefit from telematics and RFID technology to track deliveries. QR codes are good for inventory and protecting against lost or misplaced goods and play a big role in customer service by automatically updating customers on a parcel’s delivery status. It’s now a standard expectation among both B2B and B2C customers.
We can expect more data-driven decision-making in a quest to become more efficient. New technologies such as blockchain, a distributed ledger system, may introduce greater transparency and security for contracts.
You don’t necessarily need to be first to the market and take undue risks, but you do need a finger on the pulse to understand the changes and be open to new ways of doing things.
We can expect refinements in areas aside from technology, including more specialists in the market, more collaboration with clients, 3PL providers being more integrated and accountable, and collaboration between specialist suppliers across the supply chain.
This may include insourcing specialist teams which include back-up personnel for when you have absentees or when you need to increase resources quickly, working untraditional hours to increase delivery efficiencies, re-evaluating whether outsourcing the warehousing, transport and other supply functions is better than doing it in-house. While insourcing is nothing new, it remains underutilised by many.
With mounting pressure to be faster and more traceable, and the competitive pressure of global markets encroaching on traditional local areas, companies will increasingly avoid running an entire end-to-end service themselves. Partnering with the correct suppliers who specialise in areas of the supply chain will be just as critical to a client’s success in the future as it is now. The delivery method – whether it be a plane, drone, train, truck, driverless car or pushbike – is still inefficient unless the cornerstones such as correct processes, systems, management and KPIs are in place.
The good news is that many of the solutions which make you more efficient are becoming more accessible. Insourcing a dedicated transport team makes you more responsive, and gives you more flexibility with costs, while telematics technology is now available to everyone via smartphone, whereas previously it was only accessible to the larger freight companies.
A healthy supply chain benefits business like a healthy cardiovascular system benefits an individual. It’s inseparable from business success. Whether the crucial transport delivery happens via flying van or particle beam will be fascinating to see.

Walter Scremin, General Manager, Ontime Group.
Walter Scremin, General Manager, Ontime Group.

Walter Scremin is General Manager of national delivery transport company Ontime Group, which provides tailored, agile delivery transport solutions to a range of clients including SMEs and large listed companies.
Walter is passionate about measuring performance and leveraging technology and has overseen several technology projects including Ontime’s unique Fleet X-Ray analysis software, a telematics tracking system and smartphone app designed to track vehicles and deliveries.

WiseTech Global establishes partnership with C.T. Freight

Logistics technology company WiseTech Global has entered into a partnership initiative with C.T. Freight, an international freight forwarder with extensive coverage throughout Australia. The partnership is designed to help accelerate the creation and expansion of technological innovations in the logistics industry, including automation through digitisation, natural language processing and machine learning.
Richard White, CEO, WiseTech Global, said, “The logistics industry is under intense pressure as eCommerce pushes upward on shipment numbers and applies downward pressure on consignment size, price, and margins. eCommerce is disrupting the old world order and will force logistics providers to higher levels of automation whilst border agencies continue to raise the bar on timely, accurate, and compliant trade data.
“WiseTech Global is focused on improving productivity, quality, speed, visibility, and manageability in the logistics industry. Our development partner initiatives represent a tightly targeted commitment to further automate logistics execution processing, moving CargoWise One to ever higher levels of throughput.
“With C.T. Freight as a development partner on high volume airfreight and eCommerce automation, we will further develop our cutting-edge productivity and automations to address these issues across the logistics industry and its many segments.”
C.T. Freight has bonded warehouses at each major Australian gateway, and through the initiative the company will gain access to developments and deployments of WiseTech Global software.
“One of the most compelling features of CargoWise One, and of WiseTech Global’s philosophy, is productivity,” said Clive W. Thomas, CEO, C.T. Freight. “Eliminating rework, reducing risk and improving margins by automating entire processes frees up specialist resources who can then concentrate on adding value back into the international supply chain. In our industry, the gains achieved by minimising errors and automating processes can have a tremendous impact across all modes and geographies.”

TCA chief to talk tech at VTA conference

The Victorian Transport Association (VTA) has revealed that the CEO of Transport Certification Australia (TCA), Chris Koniditsiotis, will headline a session focusing on technology on day one of the annual VTA State Conference, to take place in Lorne from 4–6 June.
The full program is to be released later this week.
The TCA is the Australian government body responsible for providing advice, accreditation and administration services for public purpose initiatives involving the use of telematics and related intelligent technologies. It has been in the news recently after releasing a new specification to promote the interconnectivity of telematics.
“Chris and the TCA have been great supporters of the VTA and, at a time when operators are so regularly introduced to new technology, it will be great to have an update from the peak body charged with providing advice, accreditation and administrative services in relation to the deployment of telematics and related technology,” said VTA CEO Peter Anderson.
“Technology can dramatically improve productivity for operators, but naturally that comes at a cost. Operators must understand the benefits that technology investments can have for their bottom-line, and the technology session will cover the pace and benefits of recent developments, as well as advice for landing on the right transport technology strategy.”
The session will also feature a panel discussion with technology companies Trimble, FleetEffect, Seeing Machines and In-Vehicle Camera Systems, followed by an update from Victoria International Container Terminal (VICT) on the recent commencement of its new fully-automated terminal at Webb Dock.
“With so much technology in the marketplace, operators can easily be forgiven for putting technology in the ‘too hard’ basket, however the mix of conference speakers we’ve assembled to address delegates on this important part of transport will no doubt help operators understand why they need to invest in technology to be competitive and productive,” Anderson said.

Abolition of Road Safety Remuneration Tribunal

The Australian Logistics Council has supported a delay to the introduction of the Contractor Driver Minimum Payments Road Safety Remuneration Order mandated by the Road Safety Remuneration Tribunal.
According to ALC Managing Director Michael Kilgariff, the abolition of the RSRT is the only real way to avoid the duplication, confusion and costs that this Order, and others like it, will inevitably create.
“An Order from the Tribunal covering contractor drivers’ minimum payments due to come into effect on 4 April 2016 is creating untold confusion and potential costs in the heavy vehicle industry, with many contracting companies now fearful they will be driven out of the industry.
“This concern has been highlighted by ALC since the legislation was first considered and passed by the previous government in March 2012. Since that time, ALC has consistently called for the abolition of the Road Safety Remuneration Tribunal.
“ALC maintains that because the Road Safety Remuneration Act prevails over all other laws, including the Heavy Vehicle National Law and Work Health and Safety laws, inefficiency, confusion and increased costs would inevitably ensue when the first Order was handed down.
“The confusion with this first Order, which sets national minimum payments for contractor drivers in the road transport industry, underscores the practical difficulties associated with rate setting by an industrially focused tribunal,” he said.
“ALC is committed to improving safety for all road users and it is essential that all stakeholders have a clear understanding of a number of key facts in this important issue.
“First, improving safety in the heavy vehicle industry must be based on achieving greater compliance and awareness of Chain of Responsibility (part of the Heavy Vehicle National Law), rather than being distracted by emotive campaigns to support the Road Safety Remuneration Tribunal.
“In 2016, steps will be taken by Transport Ministers to amend Chain of Responsibility laws including the introduction of a ‘primary duty of care’ into the current Chain of Responsibility that will be similar in nature to those contained in workplace health and safety legislation (see editor’s notes below).
“Some of these obligations will extend to the executive officers of these duty holders.
“Also expected is the introduction of a new risk-based approach to heavy vehicle inspections and changes to how codes of practice are treated under the Heavy Vehicle National Law.
“There needs to be greater effort by all stakeholders to promote understanding and compliance with Chain of Responsibility obligations, which is invariably ignored by proponents of the Road Safety Remuneration Tribunal.
“Second, more can be done to support and drive the safety benefits associated with on board safety technologies, such as telematics.
“Telematics enables companies to monitor driver fatigue and speed, and has been shown to save lives.
“ALC believes that the use of monitoring systems using telematics for compliance purposes should be mandated for heavy line-haul vehicles as part of a company’s compliance with their Chain of Responsibility obligations.

Sydney Traffic Congestion Costs Drivers Over 150 Hours per Year

TomTom released the results of the TomTom Traffic Index 2016, the annual report detailing the cities around the world with the most traffic congestion.
The report has revealed that Sydney’s overall traffic congestion increased by 1 per cent on the previous year, despite falling nine places to rank 30th in the global traffic congestion ranking.
This surge in Sydney’s traffic can be attributed to an increase in the afternoon peak period, with congestion for the evening rising from 64 per cent to 65 per cent over the last year.
Sydneysiders are still facing the worst traffic across the major Australian cities. Sydney drivers spend an extra 39 minutes’ in the car during the morning and afternoon peak, compared with just 31 minutes in Melbourne and 26 minutes in Brisbane.
Taco van der Leij, VP Marketing at TomTom Telematics, said: “Businesses with employees on the road in congested cities could clearly benefit from smart methods to cope with the effect of traffic. Customers using our WEBFLEET fleet management solution are already taking a first step towards this with access to a wide range of tools to help make better decisions for their fleets. Through more intelligent routing and job scheduling, telematics can optimise traffic flow, meaning vehicles spend less time on the road, and by being able to tap into TomTom’s world class Traffic Services they are able to further reduce travel times.”
Business owners can find out more about the TomTom Traffic Index, and discover where their home city ranks at www.tomtom.com/trafficindex. There’s also helpful advice on beating traffic congestion, as well as independent analysis. And, for the first time, a selection of ‘Profile Cities’ provide insight into what they are doing to improve mobility.
Road authorities and local governments can use TomTom’s traffic data to better manage traffic flow during the rush hour. We can help businesses plan smarter working hours to help their employees avoid travelling during rush hour. And we give drivers the real-time traffic information and smart routing they need to avoid congested roads and get to where they want to be, faster.
Put simply, the Congestion Level percentage is the extra travel time a driver will experience when compared to an uncongested situation. To illustrate, an overall congestion level of 36% means that an average trip made takes 36% longer than it would under uncongested conditions.

Time for smart truck operations: TCA

The trucking industry needs to take advantage of new technologies such as telematics to boost efficiency, security and safety, said Transport Certification Australia (TCA) chief executive Chris Koniditsiotis.

Speaking at the plenary session “Heavy vehicles: the next generation” at the ARRB Conference in Adelaide, Mr Koniditsiotis highlighted the evolution of heavy vehicles over the past 50 years and relevant support systems and technologies.

“Information pertaining to the vehicle and its consignment has been an important part of the evolutionary chain,” he said.

He said heavy vehicles continue to become more sophisticated, with the development of advanced information and communication systems.

The transport companies need to consider implementing vehicle telematics, he said, which could be a powerful tool to improve the effectiveness and safety of vehicles, drivers and companies themselves.

“Transport operators are gaining commercial benefits from the better management of factors such as routes, speeds and loads, there can be improvements in safety and productivity as well as a reduction in vehicle wear, transportation times and overall operational costs,” he said.

“Additionally, governments are using vehicle telematics to better manage road use, again providing for productivity and safety improvements.”

Vehicle telematics is at the centre of the upcoming intelligent access program (IAP), which is to provide heavy vehicles with improved access to the national road network in return for monitoring of compliance.

The IAP, managed by TCA, aims to tackle a growing transport task, constrained road infrastructure budgets and heavy vehicles safety issues. 

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