Western Sydney Airport selects architect to develop business park

Western Sydney Airport has appointed Architectus to plan a business park on a dedicated 191-hectare parcel of airport real estate.
The business park will offer the opportunity to integrate office, retail, industrial, hotels and conference facilities within 1.5 kilometres of the airport terminal.
“There will be opportunities for businesses to be at the terminal’s doorstep at what will become Australia’s largest international gateway. When the Airport opens in 2026, it will be built for 10 million passengers a year, but we’ve got a blueprint for staged growth to become one of the world’s biggest airports in the decades to follow and our business park will be a key feature,” Graham Millett, CEO, Western Sydney Airport said.
Graham said he expects interest in the Airport’s business park to come from a range of different industries.
“Consultants, tech companies, defence and aerospace, airlines and pharmaceutical are just some of the industries that would enjoy considerable advantage being located at the Airport’s front door,” he said.
Master planning work on the Airport business park is expected to be complete in mid-2019. Work to build Western Sydney Airport began in September, with the business park set to open before Airport operations begin in 2026.

Teamwork is key – from MHD magazine

Walter Scremin

Transport is not just a critical area of the supply chain, it’s usually a top five business cost. For efficiency’s sake, most transport divisions outsource at least some of their requirements to specialist suppliers. The trouble is, transport suppliers vary greatly regarding professionalism and care, introducing many potential pitfalls when you bring in a new team.
When done right, partnering with the right transport operator is more like ‘insourcing’ a dedicated team but without the financial liabilities of owning your own transport resources.
Ideally, you bring in a team that becomes a genuine part of your business. Through my business, I’ve known delivery drivers to be placed with businesses for up to 25 years! In these cases it’s more than just an outsourced arrangement – the driver becomes a genuine, often much-loved team member.
 Let’s consider some key transport challenges
What are you really trying to achieve?
Motivations for bringing in a transport contractor are fairly similar: take liabilities off your books; focus on core business; and tap the flexibility to make changes at short notice. What are you hoping to achieve by partnering with a specialist? If your motivations are mixed, or vague, it may be hard to measure success.
Flexibility and resourcing were front of mind for leading paper bag manufacturer the O’Kelly Group, as CEO Sarah O’Kelly explained: “We have to deliver when we are expected to, no matter what. If a driver was absent, it created problems. We would re-allocate staff from the warehouse or elsewhere to do the deliveries. But then we’d be one down and those areas of the business would be affected, so it made sense to outsource.”
Greg Welch from Welch Auto Parts said outsourcing certain risks was a motivator for outsourcing his delivery fleet. The main risks were those associated with HR and WorkCover claims: “We’re not experienced at managing HR. Our expertise is in parts. But if your transport division is growing, all of a sudden you’ve got to manage it, or hire another person to manage it.
“Hiring and firing is not really our game, and it can be difficult to find quality drivers.”
Being clear on what you are trying to achieve enables you to understand if it’s successful.
Understanding success
Success isn’t only about numbers. So how is it best measured?
Ms O’Kelly said outsourcing transport has saved costs but some benefits would be hard to quantify. “There is a saving but it was never about that for us. It was about the cost of interruption to the business, and it’s hard to quantify that.
“The flexibility would have a financial benefit, but it’s not always easy to put a number on it.
“When running your own fleet you’re dealing with vehicle costs, breakdowns, maintenance. Something could go on a truck and you’re up for $2,000. But then you don’t have access to the vehicle either, so you need to cover by short-term leasing a vehicle.”
The biggest benefit is flexibility to manage resources, according to Ms O’Kelly. She says the increase in control was an unexpected benefit and contradicted her initial worries about outsourcing.

“Cultural fit drives teamwork – at its best, both parties work toward the same goal.”

Having regular back-up drivers on standby covers absenteeism and spikes in demand.
Greg Welch said freeing his auto parts business of fleet responsibilities has made it easier to achieve his motto of ‘right part, first time, on time’: “It has improved our strike rate no doubt. I believe it has helped client loyalty. It’s important for customers to know that the part is going to be there.”
Using a fleet telematics system has cut the risk of misplaced deliveries.
Mr Welch said in general, outsourcing has assisted with business growth by providing the flexibility and freedom to try new delivery runs. “A bonus is that at the drop of a hat we can get a driver in to do another run.”
Value for money
The biggest mistake when outsourcing in any field is putting too much emphasis on price. Going for the cheapest is rarely the best, and might actually cost you more in the long run.
A key challenge is knowing what value for money looks like. Price is important, but only one part of the whole – for example, a cheap supplier won’t be much value if they can’t respond quickly to your needs.  How do you rank other values, such as reliability or professionalism? These may be critical for customer service and business continuity.
Size of commitment
Biting off more than you can chew with a transport company creates more headaches if you later find out they’re not what you expected. Sometimes the best thing to do with a supplier is to start small. Many transport companies may not like starting small, but if they are serious about taking on your business they will be happy to prove their worth before you expand resources further.
Sarah O’Kelly said starting small helped make the decision easier: “It was a big decision, because my company had managed its own transport for about 60 years. But we put one driver on and it went really well, so we gradually increased our commitment.”
Starting small is a good way to discover and remedy any teething problems in the relationship. It will help ascertain their ability to communicate and respond to your needs. But do ensure any transport supplier has the depth and breadth to grow with you.
Cultural fit
A common mistake is rushing into a decision without really getting to know the people involved. Cultural fit is surprisingly important for success, and it’s worth taking the time to try and understand the organisation with which you are considering partnering.
Cultural fit drives teamwork – at its best, both parties work toward the same goal. Consider this question: is your supplier identifying ways you can become more efficient and trying to make you better? Are they available? Good communicators?
Culture is two-way. When describing the drivers brought in to O’Kelly Group, Ms O’Kelly said: “They are part of our team. We treat them like employees. They wear our uniform, they are here every day.
“We can’t have couriers doing their role.”
Walter Scremin is general manager of Ontime Delivery Solutions. For more information visit www.ontimegroup.com.au.
 

Tired man truck driver with cigarette

Linfox, TWU study: transport is dangerous

Transport workers are up to five times more likely to be injured at work than any other Australian worker, according to new Monash research, with rail drivers in particular 30 times more likely to develop a mental health condition than any other worker.
These are just two of many significant findings unearthed in the first report of the National Transport Industry Health and Wellbeing Study, released today by the Insurance Work and Health Group at Monash University.
The research, supported by Linfox Logistics and the Transport Workers Union, comes from the first stage of a detailed national study looking into the health of workers in the transport industry.
The Australian transport and logistic industry is very diverse, and encompasses drivers, logistics, storage and warehousing workers, managers and executives.
Alex Collie, professor and director of the Insurance Work and Health Group, said transport workers were subject to a unique set of health risks in their working environment, including sedentary jobs, long working hours and shift work, isolation, fatigue and sleep deprivation, among others.
“This study presents a national picture of the health of people working in the transport and logistics industry. Prior studies have focused on safety and on specific groups of workers. We used a large and detailed national database of work injury claims to examine a range of different injuries and diseases that affect workers across the whole industry,” Professor Collie said.
“Our ultimate aim is to develop programs and services that can prevent illness and injury in the transport sector, and help people recover and return to work when they become sick.”
There are strong links between people’s health and their ability to work, Professor Collie said, so understanding and improving the health of an industry which employs 1.2 million people is important for the workers, their employers and the Australian economy.
The Transport Workers Union national assistant secretary Michael Kaine said the report’s findings show that the “pressures on transport workers, including long hours away from family, chronic fatigue and the stresses of meeting deadlines, are clearly taking their toll”.
“It should serve as yet another example of the need for a check on the transport supply chain, to ensure that the major clients at the top are being held to account for the pressure they exert on the industry and its workforce,” he said.
Linfox Logistics general manager of HR Lauren Pemberton said working with Monash and TWU to investigate driver health and safety was the “next logical step in improving our staff health programs”.
 

Workers are valued: Toll signs worldwide union agreement

The Toll Group has underlined its strong commitment to ensuring safe and fair working standards for all its employees across its 1,200 sites in 50 countries, by signing a unique agreement with the International Transport Workers’ Federation (ITF) and its affiliated unions.
By signing the agreement, Toll has committed to abide by international labour standards. The ‘global charter of principles’ outlines guiding principles by which crucial decisions will be made around the working conditions for Toll workers focusing on health and safety standards, business strategies and initiatives, improvements in working conditions in developing countries and the development of projects that increase industry standards and safety.
Under the charter, Toll, which represents 44,000 workers in road transport and distribution, logistics, supply chain and warehousing, has committed to making a significant investment in the development and implementation of a global project that will raise standards and safety in its main sectors.
The charter was launched at an event at the ITF’s newly-opened Singapore office, and was attended by ITF general secretary Steve Cotton, ITF head of inland transport Noel Coard, national secretary of the Transport Workers’ Union (TWU) Tony Sheldon and Michael Byrne, managing director of Toll.
Michael Byrne said the company was delighted to be taking the lead on improving standards for transport and logistics workers.
“Our agreement with the ITF reflects Toll’s broader commitment to creating a strong and viable logistics industry that fosters a safe and rewarding work environment for all. With this charter, Toll and the ITF are setting clear standards to our approach for safety, labour relations and growth in our industry. I am proud that Toll is leading the way and I look forward to working cooperatively with the ITF to shape these future standards,” Mr Byrne said.
Steve Cotton said: “Toll’s workers are vitally important to their success. Their expertise, experience, ideas and motivation make the company what it is. The signing of this agreement truly shows Toll’s promise to put their workers first and we are committed to a healthy working relationship with Toll through full and constructive dialogue.
“The unions we represent continually strive to protect and honour their members and today marks a giant step in the right direction for raising standards for workers.”
 

Paccar Parts opens new DC in Brisbane

PACCAR Parts has officially opened a second parts distribution centre (PDC) in the Brisbane logistics hub of Berrinba, Brisbane, in a move to reduce delivery times to dealers and boost parts availability to customers in its retail network.
The purpose-built facility features just over 6,000 square metres of warehouse space.
The PDC, which shipped its first orders in December, services locations throughout Queensland and northern New South Wales (NSW). By year’s end it will supply locations in the Northern Territory and regional NSW.
The Brisbane PDC will enable PACCAR Parts to offer next day delivery to 74 per cent of its dealers, which represents an increase of next-day deliveries by 68 per cent.
“PACCAR Parts’ mission is uptime – moving customers and businesses forward,” said PACCAR Parts General Manager, Chris Scheel.
“Ensuring the availability of parts and service to customers is the number one thing we need to do in the parts business.
“For primary dealers we’re now delivering next day versus three-four days previously. For VORs (vehicle off road), the dealer drops in an order, we pick the part, and it’s received within hours,” he says – adding that dealers will also benefit from reduced freight cost in these emergency situations.
Delivery speed – and accuracy – will be enhanced by the latest technology installed in the PDC. The Berrinba warehouse is the first PACCAR PDC to use 100 per cent voice pick technology. Staff are fitted with headsets that tell them where to go and what to pick – and also in what order to determine the most efficient pick pattern.
Brisbane Distribution Centre - Front“Voice-pick technology allows our distribution associates to have two hands free and keep their eyes where they are picking. This enhances quality, efficiency and safety,” said Scheel.
Berrinba is also the first PACCAR PDC globally to feature ‘wire guidance’, an electromechanical system that controls vehicle steering by tracking an energised guidewire secured in the floor. This system frees operators from steering responsibilities in very narrow aisles, such as those that stock Paccar’s smaller stock items.
“Fast-moving parts are stored at the front of the building to really speed up velocity,” said Scheel.
Nationally, PACCAR Parts has also been working closely with dealers to improve retail availability. This has resulted in a 45 per cent reduction in emergency orders over the past five years; and 97 per cent retail availability He notes this has been achieved in a period when stock-keeping units have grown by 35 per cent.
This growth will be sustained, in part, by big investments both in product as well as the dealer/retail network. Speaking at the PDC opening, PACCAR Australia managing director, Andrew Hadjikakou, said the company would invest heavily in new product over the next two years, including two new Kenworth models under development (T410 and T360); and the move to locally manufacturing of DAF, starting with the best-selling CF mid-year.
Significant further investment is also slated for PACCAR’s 80-strong retail network, with five new locations added in 2017 and another four to come on line in 2018. At the same time, PACCAR is in the midst of expanding the TRP store network, with new outlets scheduled to open in Ballarat and Pakenham through March and April.
“To support this, this facility has become absolutely necessary,” said Hadjikakou.

Renewed focus

This article appeared in the February/March 2018 issue of Logistics & Materials Handling.
Australia’s rail freight industry has been in the spotlight in recent months, with the Inland Rail project on track to bring back the mode’s visibility – and, importantly, its viability. AusRAIL PLUS 2017 looked to champion the mode’s successes, and potential.
All governments recognise the importance and benefits of rail to Australia,” said Danny Broad – CEO of the Australasian Railway Association (ARA), as he opened the ARA’s annual event, AusRAIL PLUS 2017, in Brisbane. “Investment in rail made in the national interest will enhance rail’s contribution to the economy through greater efficiency in both public transport and supply chain networks – all Australians will be the beneficiaries.”
With forecast investment in both new rolling stock – or rail vehicles – and rail infrastructure of $100 billion over the next 15 years, and Inland Rail and a national rail industry program securing $20 million in funding in the FY17 Federal Budget, “rail certainly is the place to be,” he noted.
“An important era lies ahead of us – it is a pivotal time, and the implementation of the national rail industry plan is essential.”
Darren Chester, then-Minister for Infrastructure and Transport, echoed Broad’s comments, noting that the federal backing for the Inland Rail project and other key rail infrastructure is a clear vote of confidence in the future of the industry.
“[This is] the most exciting time in the past 100 years to be in involved in rail,” said Chester. “Australia needs Inland Rail – without it, we won’t be able to cope with a projected doubling of our nation’s freight task.
“Currently, about 25 per cent of Melbourne-to-Brisbane freight is carried on rail, and around 75 per cent is carried on road. This project will help to even the ledger.”
Seeing the value
The ARA commissioned consultancy Deloitte to produce a report looking at future strains on passenger and freight rail networks, rail safety, rail’s benefits over road, and environmental considerations for modal choices. Broad released the Value of Rail report at the event, noting that it highlights the significant role the rail industry will play in enabling Australia to cope with future challenges.
“Australia’s population is increasing at a rate of 370,000 people per year,” he said. “By 2060, both Sydney and Melbourne populations will have grown by approximately three million people.
“Freight is likely to grow with gross domestic product (GDP) rather than the population growth – with a potential 88 per cent increase in kilometres travelled by 2050, and an increase in vehicle stocks of about 2.5 million trucks and light commercial vehicles.
“To manage these challenges, Australia will have to develop its multimodal transport systems, with light rail and heavy rail at its spine.”
The report found that Australia’s population will double by 2075, reaching almost 45 million people. It notes that rail currently contributes approximately $26 billion to the Australian economy each year, while offering lower emissions and safety and congestion benefits compared to other transport modes.
“Significant investments are being made into Australia’s rail infrastructure,” the report continues. “In some sense, these investments are making up for a prolonged period of underinvestment.”
Dealing with disruption
Change was a central topic at the conference – in particular, uncertainty about the pace and extent of change to work, technology and population.
As Craig Rispin, Business Futurist and Technology Guru at The Future Trends Group, explained, the ability to obtain and analyse data will be key in the years ahead.
“Data is the new oil, and artificial intelligence (AI) is the new oil,” he said – since the ability to collect data means nothing without the ability to analyse it.
By 2028, he shared, the world will be far removed from the one we live in today. Fifty per cent of jobs will have been replaced by machinery, the majority of cars will be driverless, and six in ten people will be living in cities – with one in three aged over 100. The significance, he said, is businesses cannot expect to continue to keep working the same way while the world changes around them.
He pointed to the rise of the start-up culture as one risk to established companies, with organisations such as Airbnb and Uber enabling individuals to do what entire companies used to do. While competing with new, lean rail start-ups, the industry will also have to remain mindful of advances in emission-reduction technology in trucks, allowing them to travel from Melbourne to Sydney in one charge, recharge and head back again. “Be part of the future,” said Rispin. “Or try to avoid the inevitable.”
Port partnership
For ports to handle the incoming onslaught of freight, they will need to increase their reliance on rail, shared Jonathan Lafforgue, General Manager – Operations and Environment at NSW Ports.
“The 2016–2017 ACCC (Australian Competition and Consumer Commission) Stevedore Monitoring Report came out [in early November 2017], stating that Port Botany is now Australia’s largest container stevedoring port,” said Lafforgue. “While we welcome that news, we’re more excited about the potential capacity we’ve still got in our port to grow – right now, we’re handling a little under 2.5 million TEU (twenty-foot equivalent units) per annum. The port itself has the capacity to grow to 7.5–8 million TEU– meaning we have enough key lines, berths, and land behind that to facilitate that volume of freight.”
He noted that the only way NSW Ports will be able to put that much freight across the key lines of ships is by getting 40 per cent of containers on rail. “Right now, we’re proud of the fact that it’s about 20 per cent – but we need to double that to reach that next-level capacity.”
The majority of Port Botany’s freight is regional rail at present, and 80 per cent is delivered within a 40km radius of the Port.
“To get to that next step, we’ll need to start targeting the import freight, rather than the export freight – and to do that, we’ll need the intermodals,” said Lafforgue.
One voice
According to Priscilla Radice – Principal and Australasian Business Leader at professional consultancy Arup, the privatisation of Australia’s ports has had an unexpected effect on the conversation around freight in the country.
“With the privatisation of the ports, I don’t think anyone predicted how strong a voice [ports would] have,” said Radice, adding that their input in creating a strong supply chain is key, since ports are mode agnostic. Now, privatised ports are contributing to the conversation.
Radice noted that oppositional conversation about freight in unhelpful, especially in the government space.
“Having worked alongside governments, looking at light rail, passenger rail, road and inner-city shaping policies, I see that the oppositional speak of freight – road versus rail, freight versus commuter – I don’t think [it] helps,” she said. “Governments are shifting more and more towards city shaping, understanding their current ecosystem – they need the freight industry to provide a coordinated ‘one’ voice that is very clear […] so the supply chain does not happen in isolation.”
Radice advocated a holistic and united approach to infrastructure planning, noting that rail freight will always have to jostle for its slice of the pie after passenger rail.
“NSW Ports, your target of 40 per cent freight on rail is potentially in direct conflict with the densification of population along freight lines,” she said. “Look at what the freight piece is in the wider context for cities – you’ll never beat the commuter push. Governments need to know that the population is going to double, by getting smarter around all the technology freight will be what that looks like in terms of its infrastructure. You can’t continue to be oppositional.”
The rail freight industry has been handed an opportunity to prove itself viable as an alternative to road transport, though the years ahead will not be free of challenges. Key will be industry development focused on remaining competitive, speakers noted, whether that be through the development of intermodal freight terminals, sophisticated route planning and tracking technology, autonomous capabilities or otherwise.
With the nation’s rail experts already strategising for the various unknowns, the rail industry could be on the right track.

NHVR welcomes new SA Transport & Infrastructure Minister

The National Heavy Vehicle Regulator (NHVR) has welcomed the appointment of Stephan Knoll as South Australian Transport and Infrastructure Minister.
NHVR Chair, Bruce Baird, looked forward to working with Knoll and the incoming South Australian government to deliver ongoing services to the state’s heavy vehicle industry.
“The incoming Marshall government has made announcements in relation to the movement of freight and I look forward to working with them to boost productivity for the local heavy vehicle industry,” said Baird.
“The NHVR has a close working relationship with South Australian transport and police agencies and we will continue to develop those relationships in the years ahead.
“I congratulate Stephan on behalf of the NHVR staff and board, and look forward to working with him to deliver an on-going agenda to reform heavy vehicle safety and productivity.”
Knoll will replace outgoing Minister, Stephen Mullighan, as a Minister responsible for the NHVR in South Australia.

ALC looks to NSW Gov. for telematics leadership

The Australian Logistics Council (ALC) has called on the New South Wales Government to take a leadership role and advocate for significant changes to the Heavy Vehicle National Law (HVNL).
“ALC’s submission to the Inquiry into Heavy Vehicle Safety and Use of Technology to Improve Road Safety again reinforces the need for telematics to become mandatory in heavy vehicles,” said Michael Kilgariff, Managing Director, ALC.
The New South Wales Parliament’s Joint Standing Committee on Road Safety (‘Staysafe Committee’) is undertaking the Inquiry.
“In providing this submission, ALC has released a four-stage blueprint for the introduction of mandatory telematics,” Kilgariff added. “Telematics can help to improve heavy vehicle safety by providing truck drivers and transport operators with data that can detect any illegal and unsafe driving practices.”
He noted that, as Australia’s most populous states, New South Wales’ adoption of mandatory telematics would be key for driving heavy-vehicle safety.
“ALC’s continuing discussions with industry participants regarding the National Freight and Supply Chain Strategy indicate that industry is continuing to embrace innovative technological solutions,” he said. “This means it is now easier than ever to collect reliable data that can shape the development of a more efficient and safer freight transport network.
“Industry is grasping the nettle when it comes to telematics. Now is the time for governments to do likewise.”

Scania launches New Truck Generation in Australia

Truck manufacturer Scania launched new models for the Australian road transport industry in Sydney’s Darling Harbour on Wednesday night.
Representing the equivalent of $3 billion in research and development, the new range is more than a collection of new cabs, as almost every element of the entire mechanical underpinnings has been examined and improved to deliver a more driver-centric, safer and fuel-efficient truck.
Half a million kilometres of testing with local fleets in the months leading up to this week’s launch concentrated on the trucks’ abilities to handle the uniquely Australian conditions of climate, distance, heavy loads, and even dust.
Advances in Scania’s aerodynamic design have resulted in an improvement in fuel efficiency of two per cent, and an additional three per cent has been achieved through technical improvements in the drivelines. Scania officials were adamant that the combined five per cent reduction in fuel consumption rates should be expected only as the minimum, and in some instances the local pre-production models have delivered significantly better results.
Australia is the first market in the Southern Hemisphere to have the Scania Next Generation Truck launched, and the first deliveries of production models are expected from July this year.
A new seven-litre six-cylinder engine in 220hp, 250hp and 280hp will be available in the Scania P-Range, and the five- and six-cylinder larger engines have all been subjected to significant development. The V8 engines also feature improvements to deliver better fuel and maintenance savings, and will be available in 520hp and 620hp in Euro-5 configuration and 520hp, 580hp, 650hp, and the top output 730hp in Euro-6 emission ratings.
Scania continues to be at the forefront of utilising the benefits of electronic connectivity, with more than 310,000 trucks worldwide (including 3,000 already in Australia) connected, to maximise efficiencies.
“We believe safe and smart transport can be a ‘game changer’ for sustainability in the transport sector,” said Mikael Jansson, Managing Director of Scania Australia. “Our brand vision, as expressed by the elements of the Next Generation Scania launch, not only sets us apart from our rivals but also shows our long-term commitment and vision for the transport industry.”
Image credit: Peter Shields

VTA calls for introduction of Victorian Freight Authority

In his opening remarks to the Victorian Transport Association’s (VTA) annual State Conference, CEO Peter Anderson called for the introduction of a Victorian Freight Authority to advise Government on the requirements of the transport and logistics industries.
Anderson noted that the VTA has been advocating for policy that supports operators to be successful in business, whether it be new road, rail and port infrastructure to streamline the freight task, or new ways of operating to create efficiencies for various participants in the supply chain.
“An example of this is our advocacy for a Victorian Freight Authority to provide government with the perspective of the transport industry when it comes to decisions impacting planning and development, roads and infrastructure, user charges, the environment, and other public policy matters,’ he said.
“The requirements of operators need to be factored early on in decisions being made by regulators and legislators, which is why are pushing for the creation of an authority like this to ensure your unique needs are being looked after.”
He added that business cost increases seen across the supply-chain industry over the past 12 months have been felt especially by road transport operators.
“We’ve had infrastructure surcharge increases from all the stevedores in Melbourne and elsewhere around the country, road charges are increasing exponentially whether it be fuel and excises, registration, insurance and tolls, and the threat of industrial action throughout many sectors of the economy is arguably the greatest it’s been for a long time, as we saw over Christmas at Webb Dock,” Anderson said.
“Indeed, the possibility of future super unions like we’ve seen with the merger of the CFMEU (Construction, Forestry, Mining and Energy Union) and MUA (Maritime Union of Australia) could have far-reaching negative impacts on employers and supply chains nationally.
“In year’s gone past, operators would typically wear the increases rather than risk losing business to competitors. We need to shift this attitude and educate not only customers, but consumers as well, that increases in costs are going to be passed on through the supply chain, and ultimately to the end-users of the goods transported by operators.”
Without such action, he noted, operators may not have cost recovery increases accepted and will therefore go under, “which is not good for anyone.”
In his speech, Anderson also shared that the VTA’s community outreach efforts have been well received.
“We are getting closer to a really encouraging outcome with resident groups in the inner west of Melbourne near the port who for some time have been concerned about the impacts of heavy-vehicle movements,” he said.
“We’re working on a solution that will create a range of improvements and set new standards for driver training, instruction and vehicle emissions, and ultimately create better harmony between passenger and commercial road users.”

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