Hays releases 2018 Jobs In Demand report

Recruiting firm Hays has released its latest Jobs In Demand report, covering January to June 2018.
The company expects strong demand to continue in the logistics industry for persons with expertise in the areas of inventory management, import/export, wharves and fast-moving consumer goods (FMCG) planning.
“Across Australia, positive productivity is linked to efficiency improvements, be that in warehousing, transport or supply chain,” the company said. “Companies are targeting candidates who have a strong knowledge of systems and processes, combined with a proven track record in reducing costs and achieving demanding KPIs [key performance indicators].”
The report identified several roles that the industry is currently keen to fill, including storepersons with inventory management software experience, import/export coordinators with cargo software knowledge, fleet controllers with wharf experience, demand and supply planners with FMCG experience.
Experience in purchasing will also be in demand, as will candidates with knowledge of inventory management software such as enterprise resource planning (ERP) and SAP software.
Hays is also seeing an increased need for logistics candidates with heavy rigid or heavy combination licences.

Containerchain brings shipping technology to MEGATRANS2018

Logistics company Containerchain has joined the lineup of businesses exhibiting at MEGATRANS2018 in May.
Containerchain specialises in technological solutions to help drive down the cost of moving containers and use their technology innovations to help the industry unlock trapped value and reduce inefficiencies.
MEGATRANS2018 is set to bring together leaders and stakeholders in the wider Australian and international supply chain, including those in the transport, logistics, warehousing solutions, materials handling and infrastructure sectors.

Australian logistics veterans recognised in 2018 Honours List

The Australia Day 2018 Honours List has celebrated of several logistics experts for their contributions to the industry.
The Order of Australia recognises outstanding members of the community, it was established in 1975 by Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II, replacing the established British honours system, the Imperial awards.
The Order of Australia has four levels – Companion of the Order (AC), Officer of the Order (AO), Member of the Order (AM) and Medal of the Order (OAM), in two divisions: general and military.
Dr Rosalie Pam Balkin has been made an Officer of the Order, for “distinguished service to maritime law through roles with a range of organisations, to the improvements of global shipping transport safety and standards, and to education as an academic and author.”
Balkin has served of the Advisory Council of the Australian and New Zealand Institute of Maritime Law, with the International Maritime Organisation, and has published several works on international maritime law, human rights law and public international law.
The late Hartmut Krtschil has been made a Member of the Order, for “significant service to biosecurity and quarantine systems, to compliance development and to the freight transport industry.”
Krtschil chaired the Industry Cargo Consultative Committee, Australia Quarantine and Inspection Service and other industry committees, was the New South Wales State Manager of the Liner Services in his early career, and gained freight industry experience working in Seaton’s Freight Terminal in the early 1990s.
Graeme Archibald Walker was also commended, for his service to the airfreight transport sector. Walker worked at CSL, MSAS Cargo International and Wathen Jardine Air Cargo, and served on the Airfreight Forwarders Association of Australia, the Victoria Airfreight Council and the Australia Arab Chamber of Commerce committees, among others.

New Westport project director to navigate Perth Outer Harbour plan

Planning for the Outer Harbour freight vision has entered a new phase, with the appointment of Tim Collins as Project Director for the Westport Office.
Collins has more than 20 years’ experience in port-related strategic planning, commercial management and logistics.
He will be responsible for overseeing the development of the long-term strategic plans for the Port of Fremantle’s Outer Harbour and future Inner Harbour, ensuring that the community and stakeholders are engaged and consulted at every stage.
Collins’ background includes leading major state supply-chain operations as Business Development Principal for Arc Infrastructure and as Executive Manager Logistics for the CBH Group.
He will assume the role on 30 January.
“Mr Collins’ wealth of knowledge and experience in port operations will be highly valuable to the Westport Taskforce’s investigations that will guide the state government’s planning and development of the Outer Harbour port facilities,” said Rita Saffioti, Transport Minister, Western Australian Government.
“I am confident he will provide strong leadership in developing Westport’s strategic plans for the necessary infrastructure and road and rail links that will maximise long-term economic benefits and future job opportunities.”

Linfox announces executive shake-up

Third-party logistics company Linfox has announced two major updates to its senior leadership team.
After over three years in the role of CEO, during which time the company exceeded its financial, new business and safety targets, Annette Carey has now joined the Linfox Logistics ANZ Board as a non-executive director.
“Annette joins the Board as Linfox continues its growth following recent acquisitions,” said Peter Fox, Executive Chairman, Linfox. “Her appointment reflects the value Annette brings to Linfox and the respect in which Annette is held by both Linfox and the industry.
“I thank her for her time as CEO and welcome her as a non-executive director to the Board.”
Mark Mazurek will take over Carey’s responsibilities as CEO of Linfox’s ANZ business on 1 February. Mazurek joined the company in 2006 and has held senior leadership positions across Linfox, including in the Intermodal and the Resources and Industrial business units.
“Mark has been central to the acquisition of Aurizon assets in Northern Queensland and the development of strategic facilities such as our new Darwin railhead,” added Fox. “Mark brings exceptional acumen along with new thinking and energy.”
Fox noted that the leadership changes reflect the company’s “continued renewal” to meet the needs of its customers. “Our industry is evolving and we are well positioned for future growth,” he said. “In the past 12 months, Linfox has renewed its leadership team, and we will continue to do this as the industry develops to ensure that we meet the needs of our customers.”

Mark Marurek, left, will replace Annette Carey, right, at CEO AUZ at Linfox, with Carey taking a position on the Linfox Logistics ANZ Board as a non-executive director.
Mark Mazurek, left, will replace Annette Carey, right, at CEO AUZ at Linfox, with Carey taking a position on the Linfox Logistics ANZ Board as a non-executive director.

Toll MD submits truck safety plan to PM

Michael Byrne, Managing Director of Australian transport and logistics company Toll Group, has submitted a six-point national truck safety plan to Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull and all road and road safety ministers across Australia.
“Australia has a dire road safety problem,” Byrne wrote in a letter to Turnbull. “Our approach to heavy vehicles in this country is core to tackling this issue. It’s time for a genuinely national approach to heavy vehicle regulation.”
He noted that, having heard from government and academic experts on improving safety, he wanted to give his own suggestions, as “the leader of Australia’s largest transport and logistics company,” former leader of “the second largest transport company,” Linfox, and a second-generation industry veteran who has worked in the industry since he was 13 years old.
In his letter, Byrne called for Turnbull to address six critical areas.
First, he requested a national rule book, which would provide a common definition for ‘heavy vehicle’, and consistent approaches across states for driver fatigue, speed limits, heavy-vehicle regulation and licensing.
“The National Heavy Vehicle Regulator was supposed to deliver one rule book,” he said. “It hasn’t. Western Australia and the Northern Territory have refused to sign up to the national law. And so today, Australian road freight operators are subject to multiple and overlapping rules at the local council, state and national level.”
Second, Bryne stated the need for the introduction of an operator licensing system to ensure safety and competence, to bring the industry in line with others such as maritime, rail and aviation. “In road transport, virtually anyone with a truck, a driver and an ABN (Australian Business Number) can be a road freight operator,” he said. “Most comparable countries have an operator licensing system for road transport.”
Third, he wrote, road safety won’t be achieved by industry alone, the community, government, enforcement and road safety bodies must also do their parts. “We know that in 93 per cent of fatalities involving a truck, the other party was at fault,” he said. “Yet national and safe road safety strategies are silent on how light vehicle drivers can ‘share the road’ safely with trucks.”
Fourth, he called for government incentive to encourage safe behaviour. “Governments can incentivise and reward safe behaviours from heavy-vehicle operators,” he wrote. “Discounted registration and stamp duty fees could be offered to operators with sound safety records.”
Fifth, Byrne advised the Government to mandate telematics for all new heavy vehicles. “Mandatory telematics on every vehicle will identify operators that systematically and deliberately speed, overload vehicles and push fatigue limits,” he said.
Bryne’s sixth proposal was for the Government to ensure operators such Toll Group are actively engaged in debate and policy development regarding road safety. “Any discussion on heavy-vehicle regulation must draw on private sector expertise to truly understand how we can overcome the obstacles that are holding us back from creating safer roads for our community,” he wrote.
A spokesperson for Barnaby Joyce, the recently appointed Minister for Infrastructure and Transport, told the Sydney Morning Herald that several of Byrne’s points had merit and would be considered.
“Even though there is no general consensus in the industry on some of the proposed initiatives, we will continue to work with industry and stakeholders to improve heavy-vehicle safety,” the spokesperson said.
Toll Group’s call for a national approach to road safety follows the Australian Truck Association’s (ATA) announcement on 12 January of its partnership with the National Road Safety Partnership Program, which aims to spread knowledge and information across all industries about managing risk and reducing the road toll.
The ATA also called for the Federal Government to allocate $12 million in funding to road safety, establish a National Road Safety Commission, and give responsibility for investigating truck accidents to the Australian Transport Safety Bureau.
In late 2017, Toll Group announced its own plans to position safety culture at the centre of its operations, with Byrne saying at the time that safety “is common to all of us and a non-negotiable.”

ALC announces 2018 Forum speakers

Anthony Albanese, Shadow Minister for Infrastructure & Transport, is among a number of prominent individuals who will speak at the Australian Logistics Council’s (ALC) national freight and supply chain event, ALC Forum 2018.
Following the successful 2017 event, which was held in the Melbourne Cricket Ground, in 2018,  the Forum returns to Sydney’s Royal Randwick, taking place 6-8 March.
Other speakers for ALC Forum 2018 include:
• Brendan Bourke, CEO, Port of Melbourne;
• Chris Bresnahan, Operations Director – E-commerce Delivery, Australia Post;
• Royce Christie, General Manager – Government Relations, Toll Group;
• Paul Graham, Supply Chain – Chief Supply Chain Officer, Woolworths Group;
• Maurice James, Managing Director, Qube Holdings;
• Anthony Jones, CEO, LINX Cargo Care Group;
• Sal Petroccitto, CEO, National Heavy Vehicle Regulator;
• Melinda Pavey, Minister for Roads, Maritime and Freight (New South Wales);
• Paul Retter, CEO and Commissioner, National Transport Commission; and,
• Richard Sellers, Director General, Department of Transport (Western Australia).
The ALC said that ALC Forum 2018 will progress the issues put forward by ALC members in the final submission, focusing on the freight logistics industry’s priorities and expectations for the types of infrastructure investment and policy reform required to enhance national supply chain efficiency and safety.

Linfox invests in health research

Transport and logistics company Linfox is funding a major new research study with Monash University to better understand the health and wellbeing of workers in the industry.
Monash University researcher Professor Alex Collie told Linfox that, while past research has focused on driver fatigue and safety, there have been no large Australian studies of health and wellbeing of workers in the sector.
The Linfox-funded Transport and Logistics Industry Health and Wellbeing Research Study will reportedly seek information on diet, exercise, chronic illness, stress, mental health and other conditions associated with long-haul driving and warehouse operations.

New Infrastructure and Transport Minister issues first statements

The Hon. Barnaby Joyce has hailed progress on the Inland Rail project and safety upgrade works on the Western Highway in his first official communications as the Federal Government’s Minister for Infrastructure and Transport.
Joyce announced that the first delivery of steel for the Melbourne to Brisbane Inland Rail project has arrived on site.
“This project is a game-changer for our regions,” said Joyce. “[On 15 January], we have seen the first 14,000 tonnes of steel to be delivered just for Parkes to Narromine section. We’re still on track for works to begin in May this year.”
He also issued a statement on the beginning of the $20 million safety upgrade of the Western Highway between Stawell in west Victoria and the South Australian border, jointly funded by the Victorian and Federal Governments.
“The Western Highway serves as a key transport corridor through Victoria’s western district and upgrading this section of the highway will significantly improve safety for all users including farming, tourism and manufacturing interests.”

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Image courtesy: Parkes Shire Council

Joyce replaces Chester

The trucking and logistics industry has welcomed the announcement that Deputy Prime Minister Barnaby Joyce will be appointed as the new Infrastructure and Transport Minister.
“Barnaby Joyce has a wealth of experience and understanding of regional Australia, and understands the importance of roads and transport to communities’ right across Australia,” said Geoff Crouch, Chair, Australian Trucking Association (ATA).
“Trucking is an enabler of opportunity, allowing businesses to reach domestic and international markets, consumers to purchase goods, farms to sell their produce, and construction materials to enable new developments.”
The Deputy Prime Minister will be responsible for a significant transport agenda in 2018.
“The Government has announced a $75 billion infrastructure program, plans for progressing road pricing reform, launching a new national freight and supply chain strategy, and important reviews into safety accreditation schemes, the National Road Safety Strategy, and the National Land Transport Network,” said Crouch.
“It’s a significant to-do list and the ATA looks forward to working with the Government to ensure the views of the trucking industry are well represented.”
Crouch also welcomed the reappointment of Paul Fletcher as Minister for Urban Infrastructure, and now also with responsibility for cities.
“Paul Fletcher has shown a commitment to engage with trucking operators on the details of heavy vehicle reforms, and we look forward to that continuing,” said Crouch.
“There is a pressing need to enhance a new national agenda on land transport safety and productivity, and the ATA looks forward to engaging with Barnaby Joyce, Paul Fletcher and the Australian Government to make this a reality,” he said.
“We look forward to working with Barnaby Joyce, in building a safe, efficient and effective road transport industry for future years,” said National Road Transport Association (NatRoad) CEO, Warren Clark.
“We welcome a fresh perspective to a portfolio which is a vital component of building Australia’s productivity, particularly in rural and regional Australia.
“We hope to meet with the new Minster shortly, to discuss the prominent issues facing today’s trucking industry, including issues which need urgent attention such as: A lack of national consistency in regulatory requirements and enforcement, access restrictions for high productivity vehicles, and traffic congestion in urban areas.
“We’d also like to extend our appreciation to outgoing minister Darren Chester, for his contribution to the Road Transport Industry in his time as Minister. We admired his energy, intelligence and commitment to the portfolio,” he said.
Crouch paid thanks to the service of outgoing Transport Minister, Darren Chester.
“The trucking industry thanks Darren Chester for his work as Transport Minister and in particular his commitment and passion for road safety,” said Crouch.
“It has been an enormous honour and a privilege to serve in Cabinet in the best portfolio possible, infrastructure and transport,” Darren Chester said in a statement.
“Over the past two years, I’ve been part of policy and project decisions which will change lives and save lives across our nation.
“I’m proud of the work my team and I have done on behalf of the Government and I’m sorry we won’t get to finish some of the jobs we’ve started,” he said.

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