Container expert SCF signs on for MEGATRANS2018

SCF, one of Australia’s largest container providers, will exhibit at multi-modal supply chain event MEGATRANS2018, which takes over the Melbourne Convention and Exhibition Centre 10-12 May 2018.

SCF specialises in new and used container hire, sales and design.

The company supplies the Australian transport, resources, construction, defence and chemical storage industries, and manages more than 13,000 containers throughout Australia as well as a depot network spanning Australia’s major cities including Adelaide, Brisbane, Darwin, Melbourne, Karratha, Perth and Sydney.

SCF’s product range spans tanks, containers for site storage, accommodation and intermodal equipment, including refrigeration, side doors, pallet wide and high cube containers.

SCF joins the diverse list of exhibitors signed up for the show who cover everything from transport, logistics, warehousing solutions, materials handling, infrastructure and more.

ARA unveils report heralding benefit of rail

At the AusRAIL PLUS 2017, held this week in Brisbane, Australasian Railway Association (ARA) CEO Danny Broad launched the Value of Rail Report, a report prepared by Deloitte Access Economics.
“It is my absolute pleasure today to launch the Value of Rail Report, which highlights the contribution of rail to Australia,” said Danny Broad, CEO, ARA.
“We know that Australia’s population increases at a rate of 370,000 people every year. By 2060, both Sydney and Melbourne will have grown by approximately three million people each.”
He noted that improved transport solutions will be needed to deal with congestion experienced as Australia’s population increases.
“To manage these challenges, Australia will have to develop its multimodal transport solutions with light and heavy rail as its spine to provide the solutions that Australia needs in shaping our cities and our regions into the future.
“The story with growth in freight traffic is even greater – a potential 88 per cent increase in kilometres travelled by 2050, and an increase of some 2.5 million trucks and light commercial vehicles on our roads,” he added.
“This growth in freight underscores the need for an efficient supply chain and for a heavy vehicle pricing framework that accurately captures the cost of road infrastructure provision and the negative externalities of road usage, such as congestion, vehicle emission and accidents – a point which is reinforced in the report.”
He added that rail makes a significant contribution to the Australian economy, injecting around $26 billion into the national economy, contributing 1.6 per cent of GDP and acting as a key enabler of exports.
“We create over 140,000 jobs in our cities and our regions, provide safe, efficient, environmentally and socially beneficial modes of transport,” he said.
“We ask governments to get on board and implement our National Rail Industry Plan to provide the rail industry and the broader Australian community with long-term certainty of improved transport solutions for the benefit of all.”

The science of getting goods to the markets from the CSIRO

Researchers have provided the most detailed map of routes and costings across Australia’s entire agricultural supply chain, potentially saving the industry millions of dollars annually.
CSIRO researchers have applied the logistics tool TraNSIT (Transport Network Strategic Investment Tool) to 98 per cent of agriculture transport across Australia including commodities such as beef, sheep, goats, dairy, pigs, poultry, grains, cotton, rice, sugar, stockfeed, horticultural and even buffalo.
The information was presented in the final TraNSIT agricultural report.
Transport infrastructure is essential to moving over 80 million tonnes of Australian agricultural (including horticultural) output between farms, storage, processors and to markets each year and  costs close to $6 billion annually.
The TraNSIT tool identifies ways to reduce travel distance and time, save fuel costs, cut down on wear and tear to vehicles and produce and minimise stress for both truck drivers and livestock.
“Farmers will be saving money on transport as well as being able to deliver food to the market faster and with less damage and disruption,” CSIRO’s TraNSIT project leader Dr Andrew Higgins said.
“We expect these savings will eventually be passed onto the consumers.”
In 2013, CSIRO developed TraNSIT to provide a comprehensive view of transport logistics costs and benefits based on infrastructure investments in agriculture supply chains in Australia.
An initiative of the Federal Government’s Agricultural Competitiveness White Paper, the tool was originally applied to the beef industry before being extended to all agriculture transport across Australia.
The first project under the $100 million Beef Roads program will be the sealing of 17km of the Clermont to Alpha Road in Central Queensland, which is due to start early next year.
The $8m works will improve road safety and access for oversize vehicles while reducing freight and maintenance costs.
Besides the latest TraNSIT agricultural report focusing on each agricultural commodity, it also features a flood case study and rail to road scenarios.
“Several case studies were identified by industry and government for this final report, representing TraNSIT’s diversity of applications across Australia,” Dr Higgins said.
Researchers applied TraNSIT to evaluate the impact of road closures and detours on the transport of valuable crops and livestock during flood events, using Forbes in Central West NSW as an important case study.
From early September to mid-October in 2016, severe rainfall caused extensive road closures throughout NSW with Forbes becoming particularly isolated.
“The Forbes area is a diverse agricultural region of grain production, beef cattle, poultry, dairy and pigs,” Dr Higgins said.
“There was about a $2m increase in transport costs created by the short term and long term road closures from this flooding event, and about another 500 vehicle trips that could not occur as there was no alternative routes.
“The cost would have been even greater if the floods had occurred during harvest season where more cotton and grain are being transported in large volumes on the roads.”
Using TraNSIT, researchers can analyse several ways to reduce the economic impact of floods in country regions and throughout Australia including upgrading or raising particular bridges to reduce the frequency of closures from flooding.
This will in turn reduce the occurrences where cattle or harvested crops cannot reach their market.
The rail-to-road hypothetical scenario looked at the impact of shifting all agriculture (grains, beef, sugar, cotton) that currently use rail to be road only.
Grains were more expensive ($208m) when transported by road while cattle (or beef) was much less expensive (about 70 per cent less). These differences were primarily due to rail wagon capacity versus semi-trailer capacity.
TraNSIT is now being applied overseas, particularly in Indonesia, Laos and Vietnam to address supply chain inefficiencies and cross-border bottlenecks.
For more information on TraNSIT and to view the final agricultural report, visit https://www.csiro.au/en/Research/LWF/Areas/Landscape-management/Livestock-logistics/TRANSIT.
 

Road and Container Charging Plus Portal and Road Trains

Queensland election “vital” for freight logistics industry: ALC

The Australian Logistics Council has written to party leaders in Queensland ahead of the 25 November state election, asking them to outline their policies on key issues such as corridor protection, congestion, the development of critical freight infrastructure and improved road safety through the Heavy Vehicle National Law (HVNL).
Letters were sent during the first week of the campaign to the Hon. Annastacia Palaszczuk MP, Queensland Premier; Tim Nicholls MP, Leader of the Opposition; Steve Dickson MP, One Nation Leader; and Rob Katter, MP of Katter’s Australian Party.
“Queensland plays a vital role in sustaining Australia’s freight logistics network, and with significant growth expected in the state’s freight task over the next decade, it is crucial that Queensland’s political leaders address our industry’s priorities ahead of the state election,” said Ian Murray AM, Chairman, ALC.
He noted that one of the most urgent priorities is preserving a rail corridor that will permit the construction of an alternative dedicated freight rail connection from the Inland Rail route through to the Port of Brisbane.
“This corridor must be preserved now to minimise construction costs for a future rail connection to the port,” he added. “This is essential to guarding against the impact of urban encroachment on this critical piece of freight infrastructure, and deriving the full economic benefits of this significant national project.”
Infrastructure Australia has calculated that up to $66 million could be saved on construction costs of a future freight rail connection to the Port of Brisbane if appropriate corridor protection strategies are put in place, Murray noted.
“ALC has also called on the next Queensland Parliament to provide certainty to the heavy vehicle industry by acting swiftly to pass the Heavy Vehicle National Law and Other Legislation Amendment Bill 201,” he said.
“This legislation contains a number of significant measures which ALC believes will improve road safety. It should be passed by the Queensland Parliament as a matter of priority following the state election.”
Murray added that Queensland’s political leaders have also been asked to outline their approach on a range of other policy matters, as highlighted by the ALC in its Queensland Freight Priorities document, released in August 2017.
“These include measures to reduce road congestion, and ensuring the regulation of Queensland’s freight transport infrastructure affords our industry the flexibility it needs to operate 24/7,” Murray said. “This will be essential to meeting a freight task that is rapidly growing due to Queensland’s rising population, growing export markets and the expansion of e-commerce.”

NHVR joins MEGATRANS2018 lineup

The National Heavy Vehicle Regulator (NHVR) will exhibit at MEGATRANS2018, the multimodal supply chain trade show taking over the Melbourne Convention and Exhibition Centre 10–12 May, 2018.
The NHVR will use MEGATRANS2018 as a platform to meet the nation’s road freight operators, explained Sal Petroccitto, CEO of NHVR.
“It is extremely important that we, as a regulator, meet face to face with the country’s operators, so we can better understand their issues and their priorities,” he said.
“In bringing together Australia’s freight and logistics industry, MEGATRANS2018 will have global significance, and we are excited to get involved as a representative of the country’s heavy vehicle road transport sector.”
Petroccitto noted that the NHVR continually strives to drive efficiencies for the industry, and it embraces opportunities for communication with the operators its regulations affect.
“In the past, Australia’s road freight sector has been fragmented,” he said.
“This is something the NHVR is working to change by creating, communicating and observing national standards.
“We work for and with industry to make it safer, more productive and more efficient. To do this, we need feedback from the industry, and MEGATRANS2018 will be a crucial part of our communication strategy in 2018.”
Simon Coburn, Show Director for MEGATRANS2018, noted that the inclusion of the NHVR will bolster the wide range of businesses already set to exhibit at the show.
“Having such a prominent organisation come on board with MEGATRANS2018 shows us an event of this scale is needed and necessary to help connect the sectors comprising Australia’s supply chain,” he said.
Designed to provide a single point of contact for all heavy vehicle regulation in Australia, the NHVR manages programs such as National Heavy Vehicle Accreditation Scheme (NHVAS) and the Performance-Based Standards (PBS) scheme, recognised globally for its contribution to improved efficiency, safety and productivity in Australia’s fleet.

SAF-Holland joins MEGATRANS2018

SAF-Holland is the latest commercial road transport equipment specialist to join supply chain trade event MEGATRANS2018.
The company is a leading original equipment manufacturer (OEM) for the global commercial vehicle industry, which has provided a range of solutions for fleet operators to boost freight productivity, equipment efficiency and safer operations through the implementation of innovative SAF-Holland components and technology.
The OEM is known for providing the commercial road transport industry with axle and suspensions systems, landing gear, braking systems, truck and bus suspensions and couplings.
SAF-Holland is a welcome addition to the multimodal logistics and supply chain event, which will make its debut in Melbourne next May.
SAF-Holland will take the opportunity at the trade event to meet directly and engage with OEMs, end-users and third-party logistics companies that are becoming increasingly sophisticated in their knowledge of components technology and their requirements to reduce tare weight, improve productivity and increase safety.

Transport ministers approve next step in automated vehicle regulation

Australian transport ministers have approved two key automated vehicle reforms as part of a roadmap of reform to support commercial deployment.
Paul Retter, CEO, National Transport Commission (NTC), said ministers endorsed new national enforcement guidelines and agreed to progress the development of a safety assurance system at the Transport and Infrastructure Council meeting on 10 November.
“Ministers have agreed to a goal of having an end-to-end regulatory system in place by 2020 to support the safe, commercial deployment of automated vehicles at all levels of automation,” said Retter. “This is an important milestone towards that goal.
“Australia is one of the first countries to make this bold commitment to 2020. We want to give certainty to manufacturers by ensuring our regulatory system is flexible and responsive to encourage innovation.”
The National Enforcement Guidelines reportedly provide guidance to police for applying the road rules to automated vehicles.
“These guidelines provide clarity around who is in control of a vehicle at different levels of automation,” said Retter.
“They confirm that a human driver is responsible for the driving task when conditional automation is engaged.
“They also determine that having hands on the wheel is no longer an indicator of having proper control when conditional automation is safely engaged.”

Last chance to attend 2017 CCF Summit and Awards

Time is running out to register for the 2017 CCF Australian Infrastructure Summit and National Earth Awards Gala Dinner, which takes place in Canberra 21 – 22 November.
The event gives delegates unique insight into the major developments taking place in the civil construction space, bolstered by a range of industry speakers and a full summit program including:
*Opening presentation by the Hon Darren Chester MP, Federal Minister for Infrastructure and Transport
* Launch of the 2017-2018 CCF Infrastructure Report
* National Infrastructure Construction Schedule (NICS)
* CLARA’s ‘Smart City Project’
* NHVR’s ‘Heavy Vehicle Permit AccessCONNECT Program
* Australian Rail Track Corporation’s ‘Inland Rail Project
Attendees can view the full Summit program, and register for the event and the 2017 CCF National Earth Awards Gala Dinner – recognising excellence in civil construction projects across Australia – here.

VTA calls for safety rethink on Port of Melbourne access

The Victorian Transport Association (VTA) has labelled plans to develop an on-road cycling path on Lorimer Street in a future Fishermans Bend precinct “irresponsible recipe for disaster.”
A draft of the Fishermans Bend Framework released late last month by Planning Minister Richard Wynne and Member for Albert Park Martin Foley contains recommendations for cycling and other infrastructure to support the 80,000 people and jobs the Victorian Government hopes to attract to the new precinct.
The draft contains a map of existing and proposed cycling infrastructure, including a north-south strategic cycling corridor connecting to a new Lorimer Street on-road cycling path between the Bolte and West Gate Bridge.
“Lorimer Street is a gazetted freight route for heavy vehicles and is intensively used by trucks of up to 70 tonnes travelling between Webb Dock and road and rail freight infrastructure closer to town,” said Peter Anderson, CEO, Victorian Transport Association.
“It is also home to numerous concrete suppliers that are visited by hundreds of trucks every day that deliver to building sites throughout Melbourne.”
He added that while the VTA fully supports infrastructure that encourages commuters onto bikes and away from cars, the only gazetted freight route servicing the south side of the Port of Melbourne is “the last place we should be putting a shared path.”
“It’s an irresponsible recipe for disaster to encourage cycling on a road so intensively used by heavy vehicles, and is the precise opposite of what we recommended in early consultations,” he added. “For planners to have included an on-road cycling path on Lorimer Street in the draft framework defies logic.”
The VTA has previously advised the government in its precinct planning to encourage cycling and pedestrian traffic to Williamstown Road, and to actively separate heavy vehicles from cyclists where possible, as is happening in Melbourne’s west.
“Regardless of who is at fault, the cyclist will always be worse off in a collision with a truck, so why on earth would you encourage their close interaction on a shared roadway?” Anderson said. “Elsewhere in Melbourne, we are actively separating bicycles from trucks on freight routes so it stands to reason we should be doing this in Fishermans Bend precinct planning.”
Anderson welcomed objectives in the draft to safeguard port access by preserving a direct road and rail corridor between Webb, Swanson and Appleton Docks and the Dynon Road freight terminal.

Lindsay Australia reveals FY results

Transport and logistics provider, Lindsay Australia, has reported its full-year result with a net profit after tax of $6.426 million, with a 1.4 per cent growth in its transport division revenue to $234.1 million.
According to Lindsay Australia, the transport division used ‘improved systems and processes to increase divisional profit 10.5 per cent to $25.15 million before tax.
“The severe weather events of 2017 caused freight imbalances as we moved products into regional areas but reduced produce out,” the company said in an ASX report.
“Challenges around freight imbalances and large customer changeovers are exoected to abate in 2018.
“We have now set the stage for future profitability and this is reflected in our first quarter’s results. First quarter’s profi is 60 per cent higher than last year. However, due to the seasonal nature of our business, the first half year is typically busier than the second half.
“However, if this first quarter is an indication of the year to come, and we believe it is, Lindsay is currently on track to improve last year’s result by around 20 per cent. We see 2017 as a year that experienced a number of challenges and internally we are focused on improving from our 2016 result of $8.072 [million].”

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